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Vol. 145, No. 34 — August 20, 2011

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Proposed guidance for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in residential indoor air

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a proposed guidance for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in residential indoor air. The proposed guidance recommends that the existing residential indoor air exposure limits for fine particulate matter, as established by the 1987 Health Canada Exposure Guidelines for Residential Indoor Air Quality, be rescinded, as they are no longer supported by the available scientific evidence. No new numerical exposure limits for indoor air are proposed. Rather, any reduction in indoor levels of PM2.5 is expected to be associated with health benefits, particularly for sensitive individuals. The proposed guidance recommends strategies to reduce exposure to indoor PM2.5, including

  • Cessation of smoking;
  • Use of a stove top fan while cooking;
  • Installation of high quality furnace filters and/or use of portable air cleaners; and
  • Adequate ventilation.

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of Health written comments on the proposed guideline. All written comments are to be made publicly available to all interested parties. All comments, requests for copies of the full science assessment, and information requests must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Water, Air and Climate Change Bureau, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue W, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-957-1876 (telephone), 613-948-8482 (fax), air@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

August 4, 2011

KAREN LLOYD
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

PROPOSED GUIDANCE FOR FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR

Background

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a general term for all small particles found in air measuring less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter. It is a complex mixture whose constituents vary in size, shape, density, surface area, and chemical composition (Health Canada and Environment Canada 1999; United States Environmental Protection Agency [U.S. EPA] 2009). In 1987, Health Canada published Exposure Guidelines for Residential Indoor Air Quality, which set maximum acceptable long- and short-term exposure ranges for PM2.5 in homes. These guidelines are being revised to reflect the most up-to-date science on the health effects and residential exposure for PM2.5.

Exposure

Indoor PM2.5 is composed of indoor-generated PM2.5 from sources such as smoking, cooking, and cleaning, and PM2.5 that has infiltrated from the outside. In studies conducted by Health Canada in different Canadian cities, average indoor PM2.5 concentrations were less than 15 µg/m3 in homes without smokers, and less than 35 µg/m3 in homes with smokers (Health Canada 2010) as measured over multiple days or weeks, in different seasons. In general, indoor PM2.5 levels were lower than outdoor concentrations measured directly outside the home, except in homes with smokers.

Health effects

Outdoor PM2.5, as measured at area monitoring stations, has been shown in a large number of studies to be strongly associated with cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, and morbidity endpoints (Health Canada and Environment Canada 1999; World Health Organization [WHO] 2005; U.S. EPA 2009). There is no recognized threshold of health effects for outdoor PM2.5 regardless of where exposure occurs (i.e. indoors or outdoors), and there is evidence that adverse health effects occur at current levels of exposure. A much smaller number of studies have investigated the relationship between indoor PM2.5 and cardiorespiratory morbidity. In asthmatic children, researchers found associations between indoor PM2.5 and declines in lung function and increases in exhaled nitric oxide, a marker of airway inflammation (Koenig et al. 2003; Delfino et al. 2004; Koenig et al. 2005; Trenga et al. 2006). Associations between indoor PM2.5 and subtle changes in markers of cardiovascular disease were observed in older adults (Delfino et al. 2008; Allen et al. 2011). There is some epidemiologic evidence that ambient PM2.5 or the ambient-generated component of personal exposure to PM2.5 is more strongly associated with some adverse health outcomes than measures of indoor PM2.5 (Koenig et al. 2003; Koenig et al. 2005; Allen et al. 2008).

Guidance

The acceptable long- and short-term exposure ranges established in the 1987 exposure guidelines should be rescinded and replaced with new guidance focusing on indoor source control to minimize long-term exposure to PM2.5 indoors.

Indoor levels of PM2.5 should be kept as low as possible, as there is no apparent threshold for the health effects of PM2.5. It is impossible to entirely eliminate PM2.5 indoors, as it is produced by essential and everyday activities, such as cooking and cleaning, or infiltrates from outdoor sources over which residents have little or no control. However, any reduction in PM2.5 would be expected to result in health benefits, especially for sensitive individuals, such as those with underlying health conditions, the elderly or children. The main recommended strategies to reduce exposure to indoor PM2.5 are

  • Cessation of smoking;
  • Use of a stove top fan while cooking;
  • Installation of high quality furnace filters and/or use of portable air cleaners; and
  • Adequate ventilation.

A more detailed discussion of PM2.5 exposure reduction strategies and their implementation is being prepared by Health Canada and the National Research Council of Canada. This will serve as the basis for communication materials intended for the general Canadian public.

The above recommendations are consistent with previous Health Canada guidance to homeowners in that the focus is first on identifying the potential sources of contaminants in the home, and then on improving air quality through the control of sources by improved ventilation or other remedial measures. Identification of potential sources is, in most situations, more cost-effective than indoor air quality testing and comparison of measured values to quantitative guideline values.

Quantitative residential indoor air guidelines are of particular use to public health and building professionals for the interpretation of results of indoor air quality studies and for the development of performance standards. With respect to indoor PM2.5, Health Canada is not proposing a specific maximum exposure limit, but is recommending that indoor PM2.5, at a minimum, be lower than PM2.5 outside the home. Having an indoor level that is greater than the outdoor level indicates a strong indoor source or strong indoor sources of PM2.5. The ratio of indoor to residential outdoor PM2.5 levels can therefore serve to highlight situations where strategies to reduce indoor-generated PM2.5 are necessary and will be most effective. The recommended PM2.5 reduction strategies can be employed in all homes. However, for those homes with a ratio of indoor to outdoor PM2.5 levels greater than one, targeted efforts to identify and remove indoor sources of PM2.5 are a priority.

References

Allen, R. W., Carlsten, C., Karlen, B., Leckie, S., van Eeden, S., Vedal, S., Wong, I. and Brauer, M. (2011) “An Air Filter Intervention Study of Endothelial Function Among Healthy Adults in a Woodsmoke-Impacted Community.” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, In press.

Allen, R. W., Mar, T., Koenig, J., Liu, L.-S., Gould, T., Simpson, C. and Larson, T. (2008) “Changes in Lung Function and Airway Inflammation Among Asthmatic Children Residing in a Woodsmoke-Impacted Urban Area.” Inhalation toxicology, 20(4): 423–433.

Delfino, R. J., Quintana, P. J. E., Floro, J., Gastanaga, V. M., Samimi, B. S., Kleinman, M. T., Liu, L.-S., Bufalino, C., Wu, C.-F. and McLaren, C. E. (2004) “Association of FEV1 in Asthmatic Children with Personal and Microenvironmental Exposure to Airborne Particulate Matter.” Environmental Health Perspectives, 112(8): 932–941.

Delfino, R. J., Staimer, N., Tjoa, T., Polidori, A., Arhami, M., Gillen, D. L., Kleinman, M. T., Vaziri, N. D., Longhurst, J., Zaldivar, F. and Sioutas, C. (2008) “Circulating Biomarkers of Inflammation, Antioxidant Activity, and Platelet Activation are Associated with Primary Combustion Aerosols in Subjects with Coronary Artery Disease.” Environmental Health Perspectives, 116(7): 898–906.

Health Canada. (2010) Health Canada Exposure Assessment Studies: PM2.5 Sampling Data Summary. “Report: HC-IACAS-2010-09 — PM Data” (unpublished).

Health Canada and Environment Canada. (1999) National Ambient Air Quality Objectives for Particulate Matter Part 1: Science Assessment Document.

Koenig, J. Q., Jansen, K., Mar, T. F., Lumley, T., Kaufman, J., Trenga, C. A., Sullivan, J., Liu, L.-S., Shapiro, G. G. and Larson, T. V. (2003) “Measurement of Offline Exhaled Nitric Oxide in a Study of Community Exposure to Air Pollution. Environmental Health Perspectives, 111(13): 1625–1629.

Koenig, J. Q., Mar, T. F., Allen, R. W., Jansen, K., Lumley, T., Sullivan, J. H., Trenga, C. A., Larson, T. V. and Liu, L.-S. (2005) “Pulmonary Effects of Indoor- and Outdoor-Generated Particles in Children with Asthma.” Environmental Health Perspectives, 113(4): 499–503.

Trenga, C. A., Sullivan, J. H., Schildcrout, J. S., Shepherd, K. P., Shapiro, G. G., Liu, L.-S., Kaufman, J. D. and Koenig, J. Q. (2006) “Effect of Particulate Air Pollution on Lung Function in Adult and Pediatric Subjects in a Seattle Panel Study.” CHEST, 129(6): 1614–1622.

United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) [2009] Integrated Science Assessment for Particulate Matter (Final Report). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

World Health Organization (WHO) [2005]. Air quality guidelines for particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Global update 2005. Summary of risk assessment.

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act

2011-849

Official Receivers

 

Aubertin, Nancy

 

Chan, Heather

 

Corbeil, Manon

 

Houle, Mélissa

 

Morrissey, Brian

 

Pooni, Rob

 

Côté, The Hon. Jean E.

2011-848

Government of Alberta

 

Administrator

 

August 22 to August 31, 2011

 

Forand, Liseanne

2011-887

Shared Services Canada

 

President

 

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

2011-847

Administrators

 

Wells, The Hon. Clyde K.

 

August 5 to August 10, 2011

 

Welsh, The Hon. B. Gale

 

August 2 to August 4, 2011

 

Jackson, Karen

2011-888

Associate Deputy Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development to be styled Senior Associate Deputy Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and Chief Operating Officer for Service Canada
and
Commissioner and Vice-Chairperson of the Canada Employment Insurance Commision

 

Lewis, H. Frank

2011-817

Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Prince Edward Island

 

Parker, Ronald

2011-889

Human Resources and Skills Development

 

Associate Deputy Minister

 

Vertes, The Hon. John Z.

 

Nunavut Court of Justice

2011-851

Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories

2011-852

Deputy judge

 

August 12, 2011

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Brandon Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

R. J. James
A. E. Merko
H. D. Slator

Ottawa, August 8, 2011

RICHARD WEX
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the North Bay Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Martin Ransom
Robert Crowder

Ottawa, August 5, 2011

RICHARD WEX
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Prince Albert Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

John Hareuther
Bruce Parker

Ottawa, August 10, 2011

RICHARD WEX
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

[34-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Toronto Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ryszard Wiszniowski
Dennis Buligan
Gil Linay

Ottawa, August 10, 2011

RICHARD WEX
Assistant Deputy Minister
Law Enforcement and Policing Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Hamilton Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

BY THE MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

WHEREAS Letters Patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Hamilton Port Authority (“Authority”) under the authority of the Canada Marine Act, effective May 1, 2001;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the Letters Patent describes the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS in support of port operations, the Authority wishes to acquire from Glasfamy Holdings Ltd. the real property described in the attached schedule;

AND WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister of Transport issue Supplementary Letters Patent to add to Schedule C of the Letters Patent the real property described in the attached schedule;

NOW THEREFORE under the authority of section 9 of the Canada Marine Act, the Letters Patent are amended by adding, to Schedule C of the Letters Patent, the real property described in the attached schedule to the paragraph that begins with “THIRDLY:” immediately following the phrase “Part of Lots 11, 12 and 13, Broken Front Concession”.

These Supplementary Letters Patent are to be effective on the date of registration in the City of Hamilton Land Title Office of the transfer documents evidencing the transfer of the real property described in the attached schedule from Glasfamy Holdings Ltd. to the Authority.

Issued under my hand this 2nd day of August 2011.

_________________________________
Denis Lebel, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

SCHEDULE

including Part of lot 13, Broken Front Concession, formerly township of Barton, now city of Hamilton, being PIN 17579-0079 (LT) being municipally known as 560 Ferguson Avenue North, Hamilton, Ontario,

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NOTICE OF VACANCIES

CANADIAN TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND SAFETY BOARD

Members (full-time or part-time positions)

The Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board (the Board) is an independent federal agency established by the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act. The Board performs a key role within the Canadian transportation system by independently investigating accidents in the marine, air, rail and pipeline modes for the sole purpose of advancing transportation safety. The Board, consisting of not more than five members including the Chair, makes findings as to causes and contributing factors, identifies safety deficiencies, makes recommendations, and reports publicly on its investigations and findings.

Board members ensure investigation reports on transportation accidents reflect objective, competent analysis of safety failures in the national transportation system and make recommendations to address deficiencies.

The successful candidates will possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study, or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. In addition, experience working in the federally regulated transportation industry (i.e. air, marine, rail and pipeline transportation) is required. Suitable candidates must have demonstrated experience in the interpretation and application of legislation in the context of an independent investigative, inquiry or review role in addition to experience in policy development in the context of transportation investigations. Experience developing, maintaining, and managing successful working relationships as well as proven decision-making experience with respect to complex technical issues are also required. Experience in rail or marine transportation is considered an asset.

Interested candidates must have a good understanding of the mandate, legislation, and regulations governing the Board. Knowledge and understanding of at least one of the modes of transportation under federal jurisdiction and knowledge of emerging trends and current safety issues in air, rail, marine, and pipeline transportation are also required.

The qualified candidates will have the ability to interpret relevant statutes, regulations, policies, and other documents. In addition, they will be able to analyze complex technical information and synthesize key information. Interested candidates must be able to think conceptually and strategically, possess strong leadership skills, and have the ability to work efficiently and effectively with staff and with a collegial Board (i.e. in a shared authority model). Superior oral and written communication skills are also required. The qualified candidates will adhere to high ethical standards and have sound judgement and integrity. They must also be flexible, adaptable, and impartial and demonstrate tact and discretion.

Proficiency in both official languages is an asset.

Candidates selected for full-time positions must be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within a reasonable commuting distance. Chosen candidates must be willing to travel frequently throughout Canada.

Members shall not, directly or indirectly, as owner, shareholder, director, officer, partner or otherwise, (a) be engaged in a transportation undertaking or business, or (b) have an interest in a transportation undertaking or business or an interest in the manufacture or distribution of transportation plant or equipment, except where the distribution is merely incidental to the general merchandising of goods. (Transportation in this section means air, marine, rail or pipeline transportation).

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The preferred candidates must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelinesfor Public Office Holders. The guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

The selected candidates will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a Confidential Report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for these positions. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.tsb.gc.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by September 19, 2011, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

Bilingual notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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NOTICE OF VACANCIES

NATIONAL PAROLE BOARD

Members — All regions (full-time and part-time positions)

Salary range: 
$119,800–$140,900 (full-time positions)
$595–$700 per diem (part-time positions)

Locations: Atlantic Region (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador [regional office in Moncton, New Brunswick]);
Quebec Region (regional office in Montréal, Quebec);
Ontario/Nunavut Region (regional office in Kingston, Ontario);
Prairies Region (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest Territories [regional offices in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and Edmonton, Alberta]); and
Pacific Region (regional office in Abbotsford, British Columbia)

No closing date: An inventory resulting from this process will be compiled and may be used to fill current and future vacancies. Applications will remain available for consideration for two years following the date of receipt.

The National Parole Board (NPB) is an independent administrative tribunal. The NPB makes conditional release decisions for offenders sentenced to federal penitentiaries and for offenders serving sentences of less than two years in provinces and territories that do not have their own parole boards. The NPB is also responsible for making pardon decisions under the Criminal Records Act and recommendations for the exercise of clemency through the Royal Prerogative of Mercy.

Members of the NPB are committed to the highest standards of excellence in their work.

The successful candidates must have a degree from a recognized university in one of the disciplines comprising the human sciences (law, criminology, social work, psychology, sociology, etc.) or an acceptable combination of relevant education, job-related training and/or experience. A minimum of five years experience in a decision-making environment and/or in the interpretation or application of legislation, government policies or directives is essential.

The selected candidates must possess knowledge of the criminal justice system and of the societal issues impacting on the criminal justice environment, including gender, Aboriginal, and visible minority issues. Knowledge of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the Criminal Records Act and their interpretation and application related to conditional release and pardons is considered an asset.

The chosen candidates must be able to understand and apply Court decisions, quickly and effectively synthesize relevant case information, and be efficient in managing time and setting priorities. They must have excellent analytical skills and effective interviewing and decision-making skills, as well as clear, concise and comprehensive writing and spoken communications skills. The ability to perform in an environment with a heavy workload and tight time constraints and to perform in a stressful environment is also necessary. Computer skills, specifically in the use of word processing software, are essential.

The suitable candidates must possess sound judgement and discretion in managing highly sensitive information. They must be adaptable and flexible, and be sensitive to Aboriginal, multiculturalism and gender issues. Candidates must be able to work effectively both independently and as part of a team.

Proficiency in both official languages is considered an asset.

Preference will be given to applicants who reside in the region where they have applied.

Selected candidates must be available to travel extensively outside the immediate area of the regional office to which they have been appointed, and to be away from home overnight frequently to conduct hearings in federal and provincial institutions.

Selected full-time candidates must be willing to relocate to the area of employment or to a location within reasonable commuting distance. Selected part-time candidates must be available to work a minimum of 5 to 10 days per month. A valid driver’s licence, or a personal means of transportation to penitentiaries throughout the region, some of which are in rural and remote location, is required.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

Selected candidates must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca.

Selected candidates will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a Confidential Report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for these positions. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.pbc-clcc.gc.ca.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae and/or letter of application explicitly addressing the above criteria to Sandra Lynn Roberge, Executive Assistant to the Chairperson, Parole Board of Canada, Leima Building, 7th Floor, 410 Laurier Avenue W, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R1, 613-954-7457 (telephone), 613-941-9426 (fax), employment-emploi@pbc-clcc.gc.ca (email).

Bilingual notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format (audio cassette, diskette, Braille, large print, etc.) upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at July 31, 2011

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

3.9

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

3.0

 
   

3.0

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

21,054.9

 

Government of Canada bonds

38,855.4

 

Other investments

314.1

 
   

60,234.4

Property and equipment

 

151.3

Intangible assets

 

34.2

Other assets

 

217.5

   

60,634.3

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

57,654.4

Deposits

Government of Canada

1,241.0

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

25.2

 

Other deposits

777.1

 
   

2,043.3

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
     

Other liabilities

Securities sold under

   

repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

507.5

 
     

507.5

     

60,205.2

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

285.0

 

Actuarial gains reserve

14.1

 

Retained earnings

 
     

429.1

   

60,634.3

Effective January 1, 2011, the Bank of Canada adopted International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, August 10, 2011

L. RYAN
Acting Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, August 10, 2011

J. BOIVIN
Deputy Governor

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