Vol. 148, No. 12 — March 22, 2014

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 15173a (variation to Significant New Activity Notice No. 15173)

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance Silane, trimethoxy[3-(oxiranylmethoxy)propyl]-, hydrolysis products with silica, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 68584-82-7 under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment published on September 6, 2008, Significant New Activity Notice No. 15173 in the Canada Gazette, Part I, Vol. 142, No. 36, pursuant to subsection 85(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment hereby varies Significant New Activity Notice No. 15173, pursuant to subsection 85(2) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in accordance with the following Annex.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

1. The Annex to Significant New Activity Notice No. 15173 is replaced by the following:

ANNEX

Information Requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. In relation to the substance Silane, trimethoxy[3-(oxiranylmethoxy)propyl]-, hydrolysis products with silica, a significant new activity in relation to the substance is any use of the substance in quantities greater than 100 kg per calendar year, other than the following:

2. The following information must be provided to the Minister at least 90 days before the commencement of the proposed significant new activity:

3. The test data and the test reports described in subparagraphs 2(i)(ii) to (vi) must be in conformity with the practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (Principles of GLP) set out in Annex 2 of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, where the Test Guidelines, Guidance Document and Principles of GLP are current at the time the test data are developed.

4. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

The assessment of the substance identified potential concerns related to inhalation, reproduction, skin sensitization, and genetic toxicity to humans for potential new activities. The tests prescribed under section 2 of the Significant New Activity Notice will allow the characterization of the aforementioned toxicity endpoints, and will address the areas of potential concern.

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument issued by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. The Significant New Activity Notice sets out the appropriate information that must be provided to the Minister for assessment prior to the commencement of a new activity as described in the Notice.

Substances that are not listed on the Domestic Substances List can be manufactured or imported only by the person who has met the requirements set out in subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. Under section 86 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, in circumstances where a Significant New Activity Notice is issued for a new substance, it is the responsibility of every person who transfers the physical possession or control of the substance to notify all persons to whom the possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and of the obligation to notify the Minister of the Environment of any new activity and all other information as described in the Notice. It is the responsibility of the users of the substance to be aware of and comply with the Significant New Activity Notice and to submit a Significant New Activity notification to the Minister prior to the commencement of a significant new activity associated with the substance. However, as mentioned in subsection 81(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, a Significant New Activity notification is not required when the proposed new activity is regulated under an act or regulations listed on Schedule 2 to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from Environment Canada or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

A pre-notification consultation is an option for notifiers who wish to consult with the New Substances Program during the planning or preparation of their Significant New Activity notification to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the required prescribed information and test plans.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substanceEthanamine, 2-[4-[(1Z)-1,2-diphenyl-1-butenyl]phenoxy]-N,N-dimethyl- (tamoxifen), CAS (see footnote 1) RN 10540-29-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Ethanamine, 2-[4-[(1Z)-1,2-diphenyl-1-butenyl]phenoxy]-N,N-dimethyl- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Tamoxifen

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the substance Ethanamine, 2-[4-[(1Z)-1,2-diphenyl-1-butenyl]phenoxy]-N,N-dimethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 10540-29-1, also known as tamoxifen. This substance was identified as a priority for screening assessment because it had been found to meet the categorization criteria for bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms and is known to be in commerce in Canada. Tamoxifen was also identified as a priority for assessment because it had been identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity.

Drugs containing tamoxifen as an ingredient are assessed under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) with respect to their safety, effectiveness and quality. This assessment focused on uses and exposures that are not covered as part of the FDA assessment, specifically the risks posed by the residues resulting from manufacture, formulation and disposal after use.

Tamoxifen is an organic substance that is used in Canada primarily as a human pharmaceutical and also as a laboratory research tool. Specifically, tamoxifen is used as a therapeutic substance to treat estrogen-responsive breast cancer, and, in research, its properties as a selective estrogen receptor modulator are used to examine mechanisms of endocrine function. This substance does not naturally occur in the environment.

Tamoxifen is highly metabolized in the liver, and both the parent compound and its metabolites are excreted from the body when ingested. The hydroxylated metabolites of tamoxifen, 4-hydroxy tamoxifen and endoxifen are structurally very similar to the parent compound, can be released to the environment together with un-metabolized tamoxifen, and remain biologically active. Therefore, their properties are considered concurrently with the properties of tamoxifen in this screening assessment.

Commercially available data on pharmaceutical sales in Canada for 2011 and 2012 indicate that over 300 kg of tamoxifen were purchased by hospitals and pharmacies for prescription in each of those years. Similar data were also available to estimate that 250 kg of the substance were purchased in the same manner across Canada in 2007. There are several pharmaceutical companies that are licensed to market tamoxifen in Canada for human use. Chemical-grade tamoxifen can also be purchased from major chemical manufacturers.

Based on its physical and chemical properties, if released to the environment, tamoxifen is expected to reside in water, soil and sediment, depending on the compartment of release. Based on the modelled data and empirical evidence, it is proposed to conclude that tamoxifen meets the persistence criteria in water, soil and sediment, but does not meet the criteria for persistence in air as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Tamoxifen is not expected to bioaccumulate in organisms, due to its low water solubility, the relatively large cross-sectional diameter of tamoxifen (resulting in restricted uptake across the gill as a result of steric hindrance), and the high potential for fish to metabolize tamoxifen. It is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

For the ecological screening assessment, a worst-case exposure scenario was selected, in which a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility discharges tamoxifen into the aquatic environment. Tamoxifen has the potential to harm aquatic organisms at low concentrations and can exert endocrine effects through its affinity for binding the estrogen receptor. However, the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in water was below the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) calculated for aquatic species.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from this substance. It is proposed to conclude that tamoxifen does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of general population exposure, the principal source of exposure is the potential presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water. The amount of tamoxifen present in drinking water is significantly smaller than the amount used in Canada as a pharmaceutical.

For this assessment, conservative assumptions were used when estimating the potential indirect exposure of the general population to tamoxifen. Limited data on tamoxifen in Canadian waters are presently available. In Canada, measured concentrations of tamoxifen were only identified in the biosolids collected from select wastewater treatment plants, and were not found in any of the influent, effluent and landfill leachate samples. Therefore, for the purposes of this assessment, modelled data in surface water in Canada and the reporting limits for the samples collected from Canadian wastewater effluent were used as conservative proxies for Canadian drinking water concentrations. Upper-bounding estimated intakes from environmental media were very low (less than 0.1 nanograms per kilogram body weight per day). Based on these low exposures, risks from this substance are not expected. To further support this risk characterization, the upper-bounding estimated indirect exposures of the general population were compared with the lowest therapeutic dose (LTD). The margins of exposure ranged from greater than 13 000 to greater than 4 000 000.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that tamoxifen does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that tamoxifen does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Furo[3,4:6,7]naphtho[2,3-d]-1,3-dioxol-6(5aH)-one, 9-[[4,6-O-(1R)-ethylidene-ß-D-glucopyranosyl]oxy]-5,8,8a,9-tetrahydro-5-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-, (5R,5aR,8aR,9S)- (etoposide), CAS (see footnote 2) RN 33419-42-0 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Furo[3′,4′:6,7]naphtho[2,3-d]-1,3-dioxol-6(5aH)-one, 9-[[4,6-O-(1R)-ethylidene-ß-D-glucopyranosyl]oxy]-5,8,8a,9-tetrahydro-5-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-, (5R,5aR,8aR,9S)- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substance pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Etoposide

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the substance Furo[3′,4′:6,7]naphtho[2,3-d]-1,3-dioxol-6(5aH)- one, 9-[[4,6-O-(1R)-ethylidene-ß-D-glucopyranosyl]oxy]-5,8,8a,9-tetrahydro-5-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-, (5R,5aR,8aR,9S), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 33419-42-0. This substance will be referred to by its common name, etoposide. Etoposide was identified as a priority for assessment because it had been identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity.

Drugs containing etoposide as an ingredient are assessed under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) with respect to their safety, effectiveness and quality. This assessment focused on uses and exposures that are not covered as part of the FDA assessment, specifically the risks posed by the residues resulting from manufacture, formulation and disposal after use.

Etoposide is an organic substance, derived from the laboratory transformation of the root of the Mayapple tree (Podophyllum peltatum), that is registered for use in Canada as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of small lung tumours and testis cancer. A total of 23 kg of etoposide was sold to hospitals and pharmacies across Canada in 2012.

Based on etoposide’s chemotherapeutic use in humans, a small amount of this substance may be released to wastewater systems after passing through the human gastrointestinal tract or renal system. Etoposide has moderate solubility in water, minimal volatility, and no tendency to partition to lipids of organisms. For these reasons, etoposide may still be predominantly found in water if released in that medium.

Based on its physical and chemical properties, etoposide is expected to predominantly reside in water and soil, depending on the compartment of release. Based on empirical and modelled data, it is proposed to conclude that etoposide meets the persistence criteria in water, soil and sediment, but does not meet the criteria for air as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Etoposide has a low bioaccumulation potential based on a qualitative assessment of its physical and chemical properties (i.e. high molecular weight, low octanol-water partition coefficient [log Kow]), and a high potential to be metabolized and excreted readily by fish. It is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Based on empirical and modelled effect data, etoposide is expected to be moderately toxic to organisms in the aquatic environment. There are indications that etoposide may induce genotoxicity and affect endocrine function in mammals and aquatic organisms. To account for these sublethal effects, which would not be detected by standard acute toxicity tests, a high assessment factor was selected to determine the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC), given that these effects often impact the population level rather than the organism level.

For the ecological assessment, realistic, conservative exposure scenarios were selected for the aquatic environment based on expected releases for a site-specific industrial operation and for down-the-drain releases of the substance. The predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) in water were below the PNEC calculated for aquatic organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from etoposide. It is proposed to conclude that etoposide does not meet the criteria of paragraphs 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of general population exposure, the principal source of exposure is the potential presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water. The amount of etoposide present in drinking water is significantly smaller than the amount used in Canada as a pharmaceutical.

For this assessment, conservative assumptions were used when estimating the potential indirect exposure of the general population to etoposide. Etoposide was not detected in measurements taken from wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent at six plants across Canada. Upper-bounding estimated intakes of environmental residues based on the reporting limit from that study and on modelled surface water concentrations were very low (less than 1.5 nanograms per kilogram of body weight per day). Based on low exposures, risks from this substance are not expected. To further support this risk characterization, the upper-bounding estimated indirect exposures of the general population were compared with the lowest therapeutic dose (LTD). The margins of exposure ranged from greater than 2 000 000 to 3 000 000.

Based on a comparison of conservative exposure estimates to the LTD identified for oral use of etoposide, the calculated margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the database and to protect human health.

Based on the adequacy of the margins, it is proposed to conclude that etoposide does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that etoposide does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance5,12-Naphthacenedione, 10-[(3-amino-2,3,6-trideoxy-a-L-lyxo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,8,11-trihydroxy-8-(hydroxyacetyl)-1-methoxy-, (8S-cis)- (doxorubicin), CAS (see footnote 3) RN 23214-92-8 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 5,12-Naphthacenedione, 10-[(3-amino-2,3,6-trideoxy-a-L-lyxo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,8,11-trihydroxy-8-(hydroxyacetyl)-1-methoxy-, (8S-cis)- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substance pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Doxorubicin

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the substance 5,12-Naphthacenedione, 10-[(3-amino-2,3,6-trideoxy-α-L-lyxo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,8,11-trihydroxy-8-(hydroxyacetyl)-1-methoxy-, (8S-cis)-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 23214-92-8. This substance will be referred to by its common name, doxorubicin. Doxorubicin was prioritized for assessment because it has been identified as posing a potential high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity.

Drugs containing doxorubicin as an ingredient are assessed under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) with respect to their safety, effectiveness and quality. This assessment focused on uses and exposures that are not covered as part of the FDA assessment, specifically the risks posed by the residues resulting from manufacture, formulation and disposal after use.

Doxorubicin is an organic substance that occurs naturally in the environment. The red-coloured compound called doxorubicin is produced by mutating a strain of Streptomyces using N-nitroso-N-methyl urethane into a new strain (S. peucetius var. caesius). Doxorubicin is registered for use in Canada primarily for cancer therapy.

Information available for this substance indicates that its uses are limited to pharmaceuticals and research; there are several pharmaceutical companies licensed to market doxorubicin in Canada for human consumption or for research. Chemical-grade doxorubicin can be purchased from chemical manufacturers. No information was found regarding alternative uses or releases of this substance in Canada. Data were available to estimate that 31 kg of the substance were sold to hospitals and pharmacies across Canada in 2007. Data were also available to estimate that 4.5 kg and 4.3 kg of doxorubicin were sold to hospitals and pharmacies across Canada in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Although doxorubicin was included in a survey conducted under section 71 of CEPA 1999 to collect information relevant to its manufacture and import in 2009, no responses were received from the Canadian public or industry, which indicates there was no manufacture or import of the substance in that year.

Based on its physical and chemical properties (high water solubility, low volatility), doxorubicin is expected to predominantly reside in water, sediment and soil, depending on the compartment of release. Doxorubicin can make its way to surface waters through release from manufacturing or formulation sites and/or release as an un-metabolized substance in feces or urine from consumers directly using this substance. The main source of ecological exposure to doxorubicin is surface water. However, no information was available regarding actual releases of this substance in Canada. Based on modelled data, it is proposed to conclude that doxorubicin meets the persistence criteria for water, soil and sediment, but does not meet the criterion for air as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Doxorubicin has a low bioaccumulation potential given its physical and chemical properties (i.e. high molecular weight, low octanol-water partition coefficient [log Kow]) and the ability of some aquatic organisms to reduce their cellular accumulation of it. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that doxorubicin does not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations. Additionally, doxorubicin has the potential to harm aquatic organisms at moderately low concentrations.

For the ecological assessment, realistic conservative exposure scenarios were selected for the aquatic environment based on expected releases for a site-specific industrial operation and for down-the-drain releases of the substance. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in water was below predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) calculated for fish, daphnids and algae.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from doxorubicin. It is proposed to conclude that doxorubicin does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of general population exposure, the principal source of exposure is the potential presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water. The amount of doxorubicin present in drinking water is significantly smaller than the amount used in Canada as a pharmaceutical.

For this assessment, conservative assumptions were used when estimating the potential indirect exposure of the general population to doxorubicin. Doxorubicin was not detected in measurements taken from wastewater treatment plant influent and effluent at six plants across Canada. In regard to potential general population exposure, upper-bounding estimated intakes from environmental media are low. Based on these low exposures, risks posed by these substances are not expected. To further support this risk characterization, the upper-bounding estimated indirect exposures of the general population were compared with the lowest therapeutic dose (LTD) identified for the substance. The margins of exposure are large (greater than 100 000).

Based on a comparison of conservative exposure estimates to the LTD identified for oral use of doxorubicin, the calculated margins of exposure are considered to be adequate to address uncertainties in the database and to protect human health.

Based on the adequacy of the margins, it is proposed to conclude that doxorubicin does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that doxorubicin does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — Cyclosporin A, CAS (see footnote 4) RN 59865-13-3, and Cyclosporin E, CAS RN 63798-73-2 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas cyclosporin A and cyclosporin E are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers 59865-13-3 and 63798-73-2. Cyclosporin A was identified as a priority for assessment because it had been identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity. Cyclosporin E has no such classification but is structurally very similar to Cyclosporin A. Both Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E met the categorization criteria for persistence and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms.

Drugs containing Cyclosporin A as an ingredient are assessed under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) with respect to their safety, effectiveness and quality. This assessment focused on uses and exposures that are not covered as part of the FDA assessment, specifically the risks posed by the residues resulting from manufacture, formulation and disposal after use.

Cyclosporins are naturally occurring substances in the environment produced by the fungi Tolypocladium inflatum Gams, Beauveria nivea and Verticillium sp. Cyclosporins may be released by the fungi as toxins or to impair immune responses within the infected organism (e.g. insects), thereby facilitating fungal development.

Cyclosporin A is an organic substance used in Canada as an active pharmaceutical ingredient in human and veterinary drugs. It is used as a therapeutic and immunosuppressant agent, commonly used in humans to prevent the rejection of allograft/organ transplants and to treat rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. Specific uses for Cyclosporin E were not identified. Data were available to estimate that 622 kg of Cyclosporin A were sold to hospitals and pharmacies across Canada in 2007. Data were also available to estimate that 548 kg and 544 kg of Cyclosporin A were sold to hospitals and pharmacies across Canada in 2011 and 2012, respectively.

Cyclosporin E is considered to be structurally similar to Cyclosporin A, such that any differences would not impact the functionality or toxicity of the substance significantly. Therefore, the available modelled and experimental data for Cyclosporin A were used directly as read-across data for Cyclosporin E.

Based on the physical and chemical properties (water solubility, moderate volatility and low octanol-water partition coefficient [log Kow]), Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E are expected to predominantly reside in air, water and soil, depending on the compartment of release. Based on the modelled data, it is proposed to conclude that Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E meet the persistence criteria for water, soil and sediment, but do not meet the criteria for air as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E have a low bioaccumulation potential based on modelled data, their physical and chemical properties (i.e. high molecular weight, low log Kow), and the high potential for fish to metabolize Cyclosporin A. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

As Cyclosporin E is not registered for use in Canada, there are no known releases or exposure to the Canadian environment. Cyclosporin A can make its way to surface waters through release from manufacturing or formulation sites, and/or release as an un-metabolized substance in feces or urine from consumers using it. Given these potential releases, the main source of ecological exposure to Cyclosporin A is water. Because no information was available regarding actual releases of this substance in Canada, realistic conservative exposure scenarios, selected for a site-specific industrial operation and for down-the-drain releases through prescribed use of Cyclosporin A, were developed to estimate the discharge of Cyclosporin A into the aquatic environment. Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E are considered to have moderate to high acute aquatic toxicity. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) in water was below predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) calculated for aquatic organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is proposed to conclude that Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of general population exposure, the principal source of exposure is the potential presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water. The amount of Cyclosporin A present in drinking water is significantly smaller than the amount used in Canada as a pharmaceutical.

For this assessment, conservative assumptions were used when estimating the potential indirect exposure of the general population to Cyclosporin A. No measured concentrations were identified in any media in Canada or elsewhere. For the purposes of this assessment, modelled concentrations in surface water in Canada were used as conservative proxies for drinking water concentrations.

In regard to potential general population exposure, upperbounding estimated intakes from environmental media for Cyclosporin A were low. Based on these low exposures, risks from this substance are not expected. To further support this risk characterization, the upper-bounding estimated indirect exposures of the general population were compared with the lowest therapeutic dose (LTD) identified for the substance. The margin of exposure was large (20 000).

Since Cyclosporin E is not identified as being in commerce in Canada, exposure — hence, risk — is not expected.

Based on the adequacy of the margins, it is proposed to conclude that Cyclosporin A and Cyclosporin E do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[12-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 23 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the 23 substances annexed hereby are substances on the Domestic Substances List;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment report conducted on the substances pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of 23 Substances

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 23 substances on the Domestic Substances List (DSL) that are primarily used as pharmaceuticals. These substances, listed by their Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (see footnote 5) (CAS RN) in Table 1, were identified by other national or international agencies as priorities for assessment based on classifications for carcinogenicity or developmental toxicity.

Table 1: Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers for the 23 substances on the Domestic Substances List used primarily as pharmaceuticals

CAS RN (see note) Domestic Substances List name
Common pharmaceutical name

50-06-6

2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-Pyrimidinetrione, 5-ethyl-5-phenyl-

Phenobarbital

50-18-0

2H-1,3,2-Oxazaphosphorin-2-amine, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)tetrahydro-, 2-oxide

Cyclophosphamide

55-86-7

Ethanamine, 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methyl-, hydrochloride

Mechlorethamine

55-98-1

1,4-Butanediol, dimethanesulfonate

Busulfan

56-75-7

Acetamide, 2,2-dichloro-N-[2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)ethyl]-, [R-(R,R)]-

Chloramphenicol

57-41-0

2,4-Imidazolidinedione, 5,5-diphenyl-

Phenytoin

68-22-4

19-Norpregn-4-en-20-yn-3-one, 17-hydroxy-, (17α)-

Norethindrone

71-58-9

Pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione, 17-(acetyloxy)-6-methyl-, (6α)-

Medroxyprogesterone

81-81-2

2H-1-Benzopyran-2-one, 4-hydroxy-3-(3-oxo-1-phenylbutyl)-

Warfarin

126-07-8

Spiro[benzofuran-2(3H),1′-[2]cyclohexene]-3,4′-dione, 7-chloro-2′,4,6-trimethoxy-6′-methyl-, (1′S-trans)-

Griseofulvin

148-82-3

L-Phenylalanine, 4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]-

Melphalan

154-93-8

Urea, N,N′-bis(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitroso-

Carmustine

305-03-3

Benzenebutanoic acid, 4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]-

Chlorambucil

443-48-1

1H-Imidazole-1-ethanol, 2-methyl-5-nitro-

Metronidazole

446-86-6

1H-Purine, 6-[(1-methyl-4-nitro-1H-imidazol-5-yl)thio]-

Azathioprine

604-75-1

2H-1,4-Benzodiazepin-2-one, 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-

Oxazepam

7481-89-2

Cytidine, 2′,3′-dideoxy-

Zalcitabine

13010-47-4

Urea, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N′-cyclohexyl- N-nitroso-

Lomustine

18883-66-4

D-Glucose, 2-deoxy-2-[[(methylnitrosoamino)carbonyl]amino]-

Streptozocin

20830-81-3

5,12-Naphthacenedione, 8-acetyl-10-[(3-amino-2,3,6-trideoxy-α-L-lyxo-hexopyranosyl)oxy]-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6,8,11-trihydroxy-1-methoxy-, (8S,10S)-

Daunorubicin

29767-20-2

Furo[3′,4′:6,7]naphtho[2,3-d]-1,3-dioxol-6(5aH)-one, 5,8,8a,9-tetrahydro-5-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-9-[[4,6-O-[(R)-2-thienylmethylene]-β-D-glucopyranosyl]oxy]-, (5R,5aR,8aR,9S)-

Teniposide

30516-87-1

Thymidine, 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-

Zidovudine

51264-14-3

Methanesulfonamide, N-[4-(9-acridinylamino)-3-methoxyphenyl]-

Amsacrine

Note
The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society; any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Drugs containing these substances as ingredients are assessed under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA) with respect to their safety, effectiveness and quality. This assessment focused on uses and exposures that are not covered as part of the FDA assessment, specifically the risks posed by their residues resulting from manufacture, formulation and disposal after use.

Entry characterization (how the substances are entering the Canadian environment) was conducted by identifying the potential use of these substances outside of their intended pharmaceutical use. Warfarin is used as a rodenticide (a registered pest control product). No other uses have been identified for all other substances, aside from their use as positive controls in research. Notices under section 71 of CEPA 1999 have been issued on seven substances to gather information on their manufacture and import. For the seven substances that were included in past notices, no responses were received from the Canadian public or industry. Quantities in commerce for these substances have been estimated using information on amounts purchased by hospitals and pharmacies for 2007, 2011 and 2012.

Given that the main releases of these substances to the environment are either through industrial or down-the-drain consumer releases, the principal source of exposure is through the potential presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water.

Measured concentrations in different media, including drinking water, surface water, groundwater and wastewater treatment plant effluent, were identified in the literature for a subset of these substances, either internationally or in Canada. Where available, the measured concentrations were also compared to the predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for each substance, and the resulting risk quotients were all less than 1, which supports and generates confidence in the modelling results. These substances are proposed to not meet the criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations.

In order to estimate exposure to the environment, sales volumes were used as an input into modelling for predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). PECs were generated for water as a result of industrial releases and down-the-drain releases from consumer uses. The PECs from both of these scenarios were then compared to the PNECs, which were based on critical toxicity values identified during the DSL categorization process. For all substances, the PEC in water was below the PNEC calculated for aquatic species.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is therefore proposed to conclude that the 23 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

With regard to potential general population exposure, upper-bounding estimated intakes from environmental media for all substances were very low (less than 2.7 nanograms per kilogram of body weight per day). Based on low exposure, risks from these substances are not expected. To further support this risk characterization, the upper-bounding estimated intakes of the general population were compared with the lowest therapeutic dose (LTD) identified for each substance. The margins of exposure for these substances were large, ranging from 10 900 to 8 × 1013.

Based on the adequacy of the margins, it is proposed to conclude that the 23 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that these 23 substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The draft screening assessment for these 23 substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[12-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

MAA-NULTH FIRST NATIONS FINAL AGREEMENT

Capital Transfer Payment Plan

By their signatures below, Canada, British Columbia, and each of the Maa-nulth First Nations hereby acknowledges and agrees to the provisions of this document:

  1. For the purpose of Chapter 16 Capital Transfer and Negotiation Loan Repayment:

    a. the “Revision Date” referred to in the Notes For Finalizing the Capital Transfer Payment Plans accompanying Schedule 1 of that Chapter (“Notes”) is March 1, 2011; and

    b. the capital transfer amounts in the attached document are the amounts to be shown in “CAPITAL TRANSFER PAYMENT PLANS” in accordance with Clause 3 and 5 of the Notes.

  2. This document may be signed in any number of counterparts (including counterparts by facsimile) and all counterparts taken together will be deemed to constitute one and the same document.

March 8, 2011

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN IN RIGHT OF CANADA as represented by the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Metis and Non-Status Indians or duly authorized signatory

Per: ANITA BOSCARIOL

EXECUTED in the presence of:

BRAD VAILLANCOURT
As to the Minister or the authorized signatory for the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN IN RIGHT OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA as represented by the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation or duly authorized signatory

Per: MARY POLAK

EXECUTED in the presence of:

MARK LOFTHOUSE
As to the Minister or the authorized signatory for the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation

HUU-AY-AHT FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government

ROBERT DENNIS
Chief Councillor

DEREK PETERS
Ta’yii Hawilth

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatories for the Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government
KA:’YU:’K’T’H’/CHE:K’TLES7ET’H’ FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

THERESE SMITH
Chief Councillor

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

TOQUAHT NATION as represented by the Toquaht Nation Government

ANNE MACK
Hereditary Chief

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Toquaht Nation Government

UCHUCKLESAHT TRIBE as represented by the Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

CHARLIE COOTES
Chief Councillor

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

UCLUELET FIRST NATION as represented by the Ucluelet First Nation Government

CHARLES MCCARTHY
Chief

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Ucluelet First Nation Government

CAPITAL TRANSFER PAYMENT PLANS

Huu-ay-aht First Nations Capital Transfer Payment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

PAYMENT AMOUNT

 

CANADA WILL PAY

April 1, 2011 — Effective Date

4,711,417

April 1, 2012 — First Anniversary of Effective Date

3,017,215

April 1, 2013 — Second Anniversary of Effective Date

3,017,215

April 1, 2014 — Third Anniversary of Effective Date

3,017,215

April 1, 2015 — Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

April 1, 2016 — Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

April 1, 2017 — Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

April 1, 2018 — Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

April 1, 2019 — Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

April 1, 2020 — Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,603,455

Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Capital Transfer Payment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

PAYMENT AMOUNT

 

CANADA WILL PAY

April 1, 2011 — Effective Date

3,621,939

April 1, 2012 — First Anniversary of Effective Date

2,552,438

April 1, 2013 — Second Anniversary of Effective Date

2,552,438

April 1, 2014 — Third Anniversary of Effective Date

2,552,438

April 1, 2015 — Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

April 1, 2016 — Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

April 1, 2017 — Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

April 1, 2018 — Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

April 1, 2019 — Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

April 1, 2020 — Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,206,368

Toquaht Nation Capital Transfer Payment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

PAYMENT AMOUNT

 

CANADA WILL PAY

April 1, 2011 — Effective Date

1,302,165

April 1, 2012 — First Anniversary of Effective Date

622,395

April 1, 2013 — Second Anniversary of Effective Date

622,395

April 1, 2014 — Third Anniversary of Effective Date

622,395

April 1, 2015 — Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

April 1, 2016 — Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

April 1, 2017 — Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

April 1, 2018 — Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

April 1, 2019 — Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

April 1, 2020 — Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

482,724

Uchucklesaht Tribe Capital Transfer Payment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

PAYMENT AMOUNT

 

CANADA WILL PAY

April 1, 2011 — Effective Date

1,349,237

April 1, 2012 — First Anniversary of Effective Date

854,364

April 1, 2013 — Second Anniversary of Effective Date

854,364

April 1, 2014 — Third Anniversary of Effective Date

854,364

April 1, 2015 — Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

April 1, 2016 — Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

April 1, 2017 — Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

April 1, 2018 — Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

April 1, 2019 — Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

April 1, 2020 — Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

678,629

Ucluelet First Nation Capital Transfer Payment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

PAYMENT AMOUNT

 

CANADA WILL PAY

April 1, 2011 — Effective Date

3,627,854

April 1, 2012 — First Anniversary of Effective Date

3,063,118

April 1, 2013 — Second Anniversary of Effective Date

3,063,118

April 1, 2014 — Third Anniversary of Effective Date

3,063,118

April 1, 2015 — Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

April 1, 2016 — Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

April 1, 2017 — Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

April 1, 2018 — Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

April 1, 2019 — Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

April 1, 2020 — Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

2,654,352

[12-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT

MAA-NULTH FIRST NATIONS FINAL AGREEMENT

Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

By their signatures below, Canada, British Columbia, and each of the Maa-nulth First Nations hereby acknowledges and agrees to the provisions of this document:

  1. For the purpose of Chapter 16 Capital Transfer and Negotiation Loan Repayment:

    a. the “Revision Date” referred to in the Notes For Finalizing the Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan accompanying Schedule 2 of that Chapter (“Notes”) is March 1, 2011; and

    b. the loan repayment amounts in the attached document are the amounts to be shown in “NEGOTIATION LOAN REPAYMENT PLANS” in accordance with Clause 2 and 3 of Notes.

  2. This document may be signed in any number of counterparts (including counterparts by facsimile) and all counterparts taken together will be deemed to constitute one and the same document.

March 8, 2011

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN IN RIGHT OF CANADA as represented by the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians or duly authorized signatory

Per: ANITA BOSCARIOL

EXECUTED in the presence of:

BRAD VAILLANCOURT
As to the Minister or the authorized signatory for the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN IN RIGHT OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA as represented by the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation or duly authorized signatory

Per: MARY POLAK

EXECUTED in the presence of:

MARK LOFTHOUSE
As to the Minister or the authorized signatory for the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation

HUU-AY-AHT FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government

ROBERT DENNIS
Chief Councillor

DEREK PETERS
Ta’yii Hawilth

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatories for the Huu-ay-aht First Nations Government

KA:’YU:’K’T’H’/CHE:K’TLES7ET’H’ FIRST NATIONS as represented by the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

THERESE SMITH
Chief Councillor

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Government

TOQUAHT NATION as represented by the Toquaht Nation Government

ANNE MACK
Hereditary Chief

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Toquaht Nation Government

UCHUCKLESAHT TRIBE as represented by the Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

CHARLIE COOTES
Chief Councillor

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Uchucklesaht Tribe Government

UCLUELET FIRST NATION as represented by the Ucluelet First Nation Government

CHARLES MCCARTHY
Chief

EXECUTED in the presence of:

CHUCK POSCHENRIEDER
As to the authorized signatory for the Ucluelet First Nation Government

NEGOTIATION LOAN REPAYMENT PLAN

Huu-ay-aht First Nations Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

NEGOTIATION LOAN
REPAYMENT AMOUNT

April 1, 2011 Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2012 First Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2013 Second Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2014 Third Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2015 Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2016 Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2017 Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2018 Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2019 Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

April 1, 2020 Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

546,224

Ka:’yu:’k’t’h’/Che:k’tles7et’h’ First Nations Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

NEGOTIATION LOAN
REPAYMENT AMOUNT

April 1, 2011 Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2012 First Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2013 Second Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2014 Third Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2015 Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2016 Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2017 Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2018 Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2019 Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

April 1, 2020 Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

446,371

Toquaht Nation Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

NEGOTIATION LOAN
REPAYMENT AMOUNT

April 1, 2011 Effective Date

316,450

April 1, 2012 First Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2013 Second Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2014 Third Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2015 Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2016 Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2017 Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2018 Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2019 Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

April 1, 2020 Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

173,534

Uchucklesaht Tribe Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

NEGOTIATION LOAN
REPAYMENT AMOUNT

April 1, 2011 Effective Date

374,650

April 1, 2012 First Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2013 Second Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2014 Third Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2015 Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2016 Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2017 Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2018 Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2019 Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

April 1, 2020 Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

216,726

Ucluelet First Nation Negotiation Loan Repayment Plan

PAYMENT DATE

NEGOTIATION LOAN
REPAYMENT AMOUNT

April 1, 2011 Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2012 First Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2013 Second Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2014 Third Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2015 Fourth Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2016 Fifth Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2017 Sixth Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2018 Seventh Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2019 Eighth Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

April 1, 2020 Ninth Anniversary of Effective Date

510,175

[12-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Arruda, Filomena

2014-276

Government of Canada

 

Commissioner to administer oaths

 

Benoit, Paul

2014-236

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

 

Director of the board of directors

 

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

 

Governors of the Council

 

Germain, Phillip

2014-226

Peart, Andrea Lea

2014-227

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

 

Trustee of the Board of Trustees

 

Boudreau, Mark

2014-225

Vice-Chairperson of the Board of Trustees

 

Myers, Troy

2014-224

Cathcart, Bernard Blaise

2014-231

Canadian Forces

 

Judge Advocate General

 

Colling, Paul

2014-235

Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority

 

Member

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Justices of Appeal

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Members ex officio

 

Court of Appeal for the Northwest Territories

 

Judges

 

Court of Appeal of Nunavut

 

Judges

 

Brown, The Hon. Russell S.

2014-271

Wakeling, The Hon.Thomas W.

2014-270

Feasby, Douglas

2014-223

Canadian Museum of Nature

 

Trustee of the Board of Trustees

 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Directors of the Board of Directors

 

Buckley, Bert

2014-243

Crate, Vince

2014-242

Olson, W. David

2014-240

Sprague, Trevor

2014-241

Wood, Gail

2014-244

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

2014-259

Administrators

 

Orsborn, The Hon. David B.

 

March 13 to March 27, April 8 and 9, 2014

 

Welsh, The Hon.B. Gale

 

April 1 to April 4 and April 10 to April 12, 2014

 

Gregory, Douglas

2014-233

Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Alternate member

 

Hawkins, Cecil S.

2014-222

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

 

Director of the Board of Directors

 

Johnston, The Hon.Robert T. C.

2014-187

Government of British Columbia

 

Administrator

 

March 6 to March 12, 2014

 

Klassen, Greg

2014-229

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President — interim basis

 

Lauwers, The Hon.Peter D.

2014-264

Government of Ontario

 

Administrator

 

March 24, 2014

 

MacKinnon, William A.

2014-216

Public Sector Pension Investment Board

 

Director

 

McLean, Cyril Eugene, P.C.

2014-234

Security Intelligence Review Committee

 

Member

 

Megaw, Michael T., Q.C.

2014-269

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Saskatchewan

 

Judge

 

Monnin, The Hon.Michel A.

2014-188

Government of Manitoba

 

Administrator

 

April 1 to April 4, 2014

 

Mood, Cory Carl

2014-245

International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas

 

Canadian Commissioner

 

Neville, Richard Joseph

2014-155

Ste. Anne’s Hospital Transfer Project

 

Chief Negotiator

 

Nicholson, Paul W.

2014-267

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario — Family Court

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Full-time members

 

Allan, Craig Michael

2014-207

Louhela, Lori

2014-210

Sanford, Mike W.

2014-208

Shea, Goldie M.

2014-209

Silbrnagel, Harvey A.

2014-211

Zuk, Colleen

2014-212

Part-time members

 

Aust, William D. P.

2014-213

Heming, Keith Ian Munro, C.M., Q.C.

2014-215

Hummell, Douglas M.

2014-214

Payments in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Members

 

Bourgeois, Guy Jean

2014-218

Cooper, Patricia Lynn

2014-219

Gullberg, Edward Wayne

2014-221

Vincent, Robert G., Q.C.

2014-220

Séguin, Joseph Donat Michel

2014-230

Military Police Complaints Commission

 

Part-time membe

 

St. John’s Port Authority

 

Directors

 

Hodder, John Walter

2014-237

Morrissey, Roxanne

2014-238

Summerville, Tracy L.

2014-228

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

 

Member

 

Sutherland, Barbara Jean

2014-217

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Director of the board of directors

 

The Jacques-Cartier and Champlain Bridges Inc.

 

Chairperson — interim basis

 

Kefalas, Paul Apostolos

2014-153

Chief Executive Officer — interim basis

 

Carlin, Glen Patrick

2014-152

Directors of the Board of Directors

 

Bourget, Yvon

2014-149

Hébert, Denise

2014-150

Martel, Serge

2014-151

Toews, The Hon./L’hon. Victor E., P.C., Q.C.

2014-273

Her Majesty’s Court of Queen’s Bench for Manitoba

 

Judge

 

Verbeem, Gregory J.

2014-268

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Walbourne, Gary

2014-232

Special adviser to the Minister of National Defence, as Ombudsperson for the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Forces

 

West, Lori Jeanne

2014-199

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Member of the Governing Council

 

Willems, Richard Floyd

2014-239

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

Part-time member

 

Wilson, Gina

2014-197

Associate Deputy Minister of Employment and Social Development

 

Yungwirth, Debra A., Q.C.

2014-272

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justice

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Member ex officio

 

March 14, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[12-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Instrument of advice dated March 6, 2014

McLean, Cyril Eugene

Queen’s Privy Council for Canada

Member

March 14, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

[12-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

CIVILIAN REVIEW AND COMPLAINTS COMMISSION FOR THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE

Chairperson (full-time position)

Salary: $172,900 to $203,300
Location: National Capital Region

Bill C-42, the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act, creates a new Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (CRCC) to replace the existing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission (CPC), which was established as an independent body to hold the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) accountable to the public by enabling public complaints about the on-duty conduct of RCMP members to be examined fairly and impartially. This Bill received Royal Assent on June 19, 2013.

The CRCC will have the same powers as the former CPC, including receiving complaints from the public about the conduct of RCMP members; conducting reviews when complainants are not satisfied with the RCMP’s handling of their complaints; holding hearings or carrying out investigations on complaints; and reporting findings and making recommendations to the Commissioner of the RCMP and the Minister of Public Safety, with a view to correcting and preventing recurring policing problems. Each of these functions must be governed by fairness and impartiality.

In addition, the CRCC will have new powers and authorities to carry out its mandate, including broad access to RCMP information to help it perform its duties (it will be required to safeguard against unauthorized disclosure of privileged information); enhanced investigative powers, including the authority to summon and compel witnesses to give evidence; the ability to conduct policy reviews to determine the RCMP’s compliance with legislation and regulations, as well as policies, procedures, guidelines and ministerial directives; the ability to conduct joint investigations and share information with other police review bodies; and the authority to appoint civilian observers to assess the impartiality of criminal investigations of serious incidents involving the RCMP when the investigation is being done by the RCMP or another police service.

The enhanced powers and authorities of the CRCC will increase the RCMP’s accountability to Canadians and will be similar to those of other modern international, federal and provincial review bodies. This will ensure that the Canadian public remains confident that members of the RCMP maintain the highest professional standards possible while exercising the extraordinary powers vested in them by law.

In anticipation of the creation of the CRCC, individuals are invited to submit an application for the position of Chairperson. Staffing will only be completed once the relevant sections of the legislation are brought into force.

The Chairperson will be the Chief Executive Officer of the Commission responsible for its efficient and effective operation and will supervise the direction of the work and staff of the Commission. The Chairperson will provide strategic leadership in identifying and selecting Commission priorities, developing processes and policies and articulating a vision that will ensure its core values are incorporated into the public complaints process.

Under his or her own authority, the Chairperson will initiate complaints, investigations and public hearings when deemed in the public interest. He or she will also conduct reviews of specified RCMP activities to ensure they are carried out in accordance with statutes, regulations, ministerial directives, policies, procedures and guidelines. The Chairperson will be responsible for the delivery of all interim and final reports following complaint reviews, investigations, hearings and reviews of specified activities, including findings and recommendations that he or she sees fit. In addition, the Chairperson will be responsible for the preparation and delivery of the Commission’s Annual Report to Parliament as well as other corporate reporting requirements.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have management experience at the senior executive level in a private or public sector organization, including managing financial and human resources. Experience in the development of policy, performance standards and operational procedures are desired. The candidate would also have experience in conducting investigations, reviews or hearings and making findings and recommendations. Experience in policing, law enforcement or the criminal justice system, as well as the operation and conduct of an adjudicative tribunal, an agency or an equivalent, would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would have knowledge of the mandate and role and responsibilities of the Commission, as well as the RCMP Act and the RCMP Regulations. Knowledge of the operations of the federal government, including those related to sound management principles, strategic reporting, accountability and transparency, is desired. He or she would also have an understanding of the responsibilities of leading, managing and conducting adjudicative hearings. Knowledge of the Canadian criminal justice system and police administration, operations and procedures is sought. Furthermore, the candidate would have knowledge of administrative law, the principles of natural justice and the rules and practices followed by adjudicative tribunals in Canada. Knowledge of the application and interpretation of criminal and human rights law would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would have the ability to provide corporate vision, leadership and the strategic direction needed for the Commission to attain its mandate and objectives. He or she would have sound management skills in order to motivate staff and to ensure the Commission adheres to the highest standards of accountability and transparency. Moreover, the Chairperson would have the ability to develop effective working relationships with the Minister and government officials, while maintaining the degree of independence required of an adjudicative tribunal. The ability to conduct fair and efficient adjudicative hearings is desired. This candidate would have the ability to analyze sometimes contradictory information originating from various sources in order to make equitable and timely findings, recommendations and decisions, and to justify and explain them, as well as the capacity to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies and analyze complex situations. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, are sought.

To achieve the Commission’s objectives and carry out its mandate, the Chairperson would possess excellent leadership and superior interpersonal skills. A person of integrity, he or she would possess high ethical standards, sound judgment, tact and diplomacy, and would be impartial.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate must reside in or be willing to relocate to the National Capital Region or to a location within reasonable commuting distance. He or she must be prepared to travel throughout Canada and occasionally abroad.

A person is not eligible to be Chairperson of the Commission if he or she is not a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act or is a current or former member of the RCMP.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for the Chairperson position in anticipation of the coming into force of the Commission. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Additional information on the new CRCC can be found at the following address: www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/nws/nws-rlss/ 2013/20130619-eng.aspx.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by April 7, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[12-1-o]

NOTICE OF VACANCY

NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE CORPORATION

Chairperson (part-time position)

The National Arts Centre Corporation (NAC) was established as a federal Crown corporation in 1966, under the National Arts Centre Act, as part of the Centennial celebrations. As a national institution and member of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, the Corporation is responsible for operating and maintaining the NAC, developing the performing arts in the National Capital Region, and assisting the Canada Council for the Arts in the development of performing arts elsewhere in Canada.

The NAC is governed by a Board of Trustees that is expected to provide strategic guidance to management and to oversee the activities of the Corporation. It has a duty to act in the best interests of the Corporation and to exercise care and due diligence. The Chairperson provides leadership and guidance to the Board in the formulation of strategic direction of the Corporation. He or she ensures the proper conduct of the Board meetings in such a way that the Corporation carries out its mandate and objectives effectively, ensures good value for public funds, remains viable and holds management accountable for its performance.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university in a relevant field of study or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. Experience on a board of directors/trustees, preferably as chairperson and ideally of a major not-for-profit arts organization, is sought, as is experience at the senior management level within the private or public sector. The ideal candidate would possess experience in the development of strategies, objectives, plans, and best business practices, as well as demonstrated experience in successful fundraising activities. Experience in dealing with the federal government, preferably with senior government officials, and experience in the field of the performing arts would be considered assets.

The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the legislative framework, mandate and activities of the NAC. Knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the chairperson, the board and the president of a similar-sized organization is also desired. The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of sound governance principles, strategic planning, monitoring and evaluation of performance. He or she would also be financially literate and possess knowledge of the federal government’s expectations with regard to accountability and reporting. Knowledge of the federal government’s cultural policy agenda and how it relates to the NAC is desired, and knowledge of the performing arts would be considered an asset.

The ideal candidate would possess superior leadership and management skills to enable the Board to accomplish its work effectively and with a national perspective. He or she would be able to lead discussions, foster debate among Board members, facilitate consensus and manage conflicts, should they arise. The ability to anticipate emerging issues and develop strategies to enable the Board to seize opportunities and solve problems is sought.

The ideal candidate would possess the ability to develop and maintain effective relationships with the NAC’s management, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, her office, the Deputy Minister of Canadian Heritage, and the NAC’s key stakeholders and partners. Superior communication skills, both written and oral, are sought.

The ideal candidate would be a strategic and innovative leader and is a person of sound judgment and integrity. In addition, he or she would possess high ethical standards and superior interpersonal skills, tact and diplomacy.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The Board meets approximately four times per year in Ottawa, and conference calls are held for special purposes as required. The successful candidate should expect to commit to the position an average of 25 days annually.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.nac-cna.ca/en.

Interested candidates should forward their curriculum vitae by April 5, 2014, to the Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet (Senior Personnel), Privy Council Office, 59 Sparks Street, 1st Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0A3, 613-957-5006 (fax), GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca (email).

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact Publishing and Depository Services, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0S5, 613-941-5995 or 1-800-635-7943.

[12-1-o]