ARCHIVED — Vol. 148, No. 13 — March 29, 2014

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substance — Trisiloxane, octamethyl- (MDM), CAS (see footnote 1) RN 107-51-7 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Trisiloxane, octamethyl- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a Screening Assessment of the substance on the basis of information not available at the time of the publication of the draft screening assessment report originally published on January 8, 2011;

Whereas a summary of the updated draft Screening Assessment Report conducted pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Updated Draft Screening Assessment on Trisiloxane, octamethyl-

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a Screening Assessment on Trisiloxane, octamethyl-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 107-51-7. This substance is referred to by its derived acronym, MDM, in the assessment. MDM was identified as a high priority for screening assessment and included in the Challenge initiative under the Chemicals Management Plan because it was found to meet the ecological categorization criteria for persistence, bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms and was believed to be in commerce in Canada.

The substance MDM was not considered to be a high priority for assessment of potential risks to human health, based upon application of the simple exposure and hazard tools developed by Health Canada for categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List.

MDM is an organic substance that is primarily used as an ingredient in industrial and medical products as well as consumer products such as cleaning and degreasing products, lubricants, diluents and solvents, personal care products and cosmetics. The substance does not occur naturally in the environment. MDM is not manufactured in Canada; however, imports for the calendar years 2005 and 2006 were in the range of 100 to 100 000 kg and 10 000 to 100 000 kg, respectively.

Based on certain assumptions and reported use patterns, much of the MDM imported into Canada is expected to be exported out of the country in products, recycled during industrial use, or present in products that are eventually directed to landfills or incineration. Approximately half of the MDM used in Canada is expected to be released into the environment, with the majority of the emissions being released to air and a small proportion (~ 1%) being released to pre-treatment wastewaters. The high vapour pressure of MDM indicates that, when the substance is released into environmental media other than air, it will tend to volatilize out of these media and into air.

MDM present in air will undergo abiotic degradation through reaction with photochemically produced atmospheric hydroxyl radicals, which have atmospheric half-lives of 6–9 days. Modelling predicts that MDM will have significant atmospheric transport potential but is unlikely to be deposited from air into water or soil in remote regions. Abiotic processes such as volatilization and hydrolysis are important removal processes for MDM in water and soil, with hydrolysis half-lives of 0.12–60.9 days and 1.5–120 days determined for water and soil, respectively. No degradation data was found for MDM in sediment and a calculated biodegradation half-life of 365 days was determined using analogue data. This half-life indicates that MDM may remain for long periods in sediment. However, MDM has demonstrated a low potential for microbial biodegradation and, given the evidence for active abiotic degradation of the substance in both soil and water, it seems likely that an analysis of persistence in sediment based only on biodegradation data would underestimate the potential for removal in this medium.

MDM has demonstrated significant bioconcentration capacity in laboratory testing with fish and may also have a significant potential to accumulate in organisms through dietary exposures. An empirical biomagnification factor (BMF) of <1 indicates that MDM is unlikely to transfer from one trophic level to the next highest level in the foodweb studied.

MDM has demonstrated a low hazard potential in aquatic species, with no adverse effects observed following prolonged exposures at concentrations up to the limit of water solubility. Adverse effects were reported in one of two laboratory studies conducted with the sediment species Lumbriculus variegatus. However, no adverse effects were seen in a Lumbriculus species study, nor were effects seen in laboratory testing with two other sediment species. The lowest effect level determined in testing with Lumbriculus species is substantially higher than MDM levels measured or estimated to be present in the environment. No information was found on the potential for effects in terrestrial species; however, results obtained for a mechanistically similar compound suggest that MDM is not likely to be hazardous to terrestrial invertebrates or plants.

Monitoring data indicate that exposure levels of MDM in the environment are very low. The substance was below detection limits in surface water, soil and sediment samples, including those collected near potential MDM sources of release. MDM has been detected at low levels in some air samples and was also measured in some wastewater treatment plant influents and effluents, some pre-treatment industrial process waters and one landfill leachate. However, substantial reductions in effluent levels relative to those in influents indicates that wastewater treatment is effective at reducing the amount of MDM available to enter receiving waters. The results of quantitative risk quotient analyses conducted for surface waters and sediment determined that the highest predicted concentrations of MDM in the Canadian environment are much less than the experimentally determined no-effect levels.

Evidence for the active abiotic degradation of MDM, together with limited direct release of the substance to the environment and its effective removal at wastewater treatment plants, indicate that MDM will have a low exposure potential in the environment. On the basis of limited environmental presence, MDM is expected to pose a low hazard to organisms at concentrations occurring in the environment. This low exposure and hazard potential indicate that there is low risk of harm to organisms or to the broader integrity of the environment from MDM. It is therefore proposed to conclude that MDM does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have immediate or long-term harmful effects on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of human health, the predominant source of exposure to MDM through environmental media is likely to be indoor air. Exposure of the general population to MDM from consumer products may occur primarily through the use of cosmetics, including some personal care products.

Limited empirical health effects data was available for MDM. Effects on the liver, kidney and lungs, as well as reduced body weight gain, were observed in rats following repeated-dose exposure to MDM and its analogues. The margins between the upper-bounding estimates of exposure from environmental media and use of consumer products containing MDM and critical effect levels in experimental animals are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the adequacy of the margins between upper-bounding estimates of exposure to MDM and critical effect levels in experimental animals, it is proposed that MDM does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health. Based on available information for human health considerations, it is proposed to conclude that MDM does not constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that MDM does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The updated draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[13-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a substanceTrisiloxane, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexamethyl-3,3-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]- (M4Q), CAS (see footnote 2) RN 3555-47-3specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Trisiloxane, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexamethyl-3,3- bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]- is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have conducted a Screening Assessment of the substance on the basis of information not available at the time of the publication of the draft Screening Assessment Report originally published on January 8, 2011;

Whereas a summary of the updated draft Screening Assessment Report conducted pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the ministers propose to take no further action on the substance at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment
AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Updated Draft Screening Assessment on Trisiloxane, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexamethyl-3,3- bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a Screening Assessment on Trisiloxane, 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexamethyl-3,3-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 3555-47-3. This substance is referred to by its derived acronym, M4Q, in the assessment. M4Q was identified as a high priority for screening assessment and included in the Challenge initiative under the Chemicals Management Plan because it was found to meet the ecological categorization criteria for persistence, bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to non-human organisms and was believed to be in commerce in Canada.

The substance M4Q was not considered to be a high priority for assessment of potential risks to human health, based upon application of the simple exposure and hazard tools developed by Health Canada for categorization of substances on the Domestic Substances List.

M4Q is an organic substance that is formed in low concentrations as an impurity during the production of certain siloxane products and intermediates. The substance does not occur naturally in the environment. M4Q is reported to be present at low levels as a reaction by-product or impurity in silicon-based adhesives, sealants, processing intermediates and anti-adhesive agents. The substance may also occur at low levels as an impurity in fillers, finishing agents, lubricants and lubricant additives, antifoaming agents, and viscosity adjustors in products such as cosmetics, and paint and coating additives.

Responses to notices published under section 71 of CEPA 1999 indicated that quantities of M4Q imported into Canada were in the range of 1 001–100 000 kg for 2005 and 1 000–10 000 kg for 2006. In all instances of import, the substance was reported to be present as an impurity in an end-use product. M4Q is formed as a reaction by-product; no manufacturing activities are associated with this substance.

Based on certain assumptions and reported use patterns in Canada, most M4Q is expected to be present in products directed to landfill following industrial or consumer/commercial use. Release to wastewater during industrial applications may also occur, with proportionally smaller losses through volatilization from consumer and commercial products. Information indicates that during processing operations where M4Q is formed, the substance becomes bound within the silicone matrix of the product, and that this limits but does not completely eliminate the potential for release into the environment.

The physical and chemical properties of M4Q indicate that, when released into the environment, the substance can be expected to distribute primarily into air, although it may also distribute into sediment when released into water.

No empirical degradation data were found for M4Q, and modelled estimates for M4Q, as well as empirical and modelled data for other chemically similar volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs), were used to evaluate the potential for environmental persistence. The atmospheric half-life of 5.9 days predicted for M4Q is comparable with values derived for other VMSs. Modelling predicts that M4Q will have significant atmospheric transport potential but is not likely to be deposited to water or soil in remote regions.

Modelled estimates predict that M4Q will biodegrade slowly in the environment and this slow biodegradation is consistent with data available for other VMSs. However, the preponderance of data for other VMS substances, such as the linear VMS MDM and the cyclic VMSs D4 and D5, indicates that these substances hydrolyze readily in water and soil. No empirical degradation data was found for VMSs in sediment. The analysis of the potential for persistence was based on modelled and calculated biodegradation half-lives, which indicate slow removal rates and the potential, therefore, to remain for long periods in this environmental medium. However, the other VMSs examined in the assessment have demonstrated a low potential for microbial biodegradation and, given the evidence for active abiotic degradation of these substances in both soil and water, it seems likely that an analysis of persistence in sediment based only on biodegradation data would underestimate the potential for removal in this medium.

No experimental bioaccumulation factor (BAF) or bioconcentration factor (BCF) data were found for M4Q. Based on BCF data for two structurally and mechanistically similar substances, the BCF of M4Q is not expected to exceed 5 000. The BAF estimates calculated for M4Q showed that the substance may have significant potential to accumulate in organisms through dietary exposures. While the absolute value of the BAF is uncertain, it is likely to exceed 5 000. However, while M4Q may have the potential to accumulate in individual organisms, an empirical biomagnification factor (BMF) of <1 indicates that it is unlikely to transfer from one trophic level to the next highest trophic level in the foodweb studied.

M4Q has been shown to have a low hazard potential in aquatic species, with no adverse effects observed following prolonged exposures at concentrations up to the limit of water solubility. Modelled estimates also predict no effects in fish, Daphnia, mysid shrimp and algae. Adverse effects were reported in one sediment toxicity study. No information was found on the potential for effects in terrestrial species; however, results obtained for a mechanistically similar compound suggest that M4Q is not likely to be hazardous to terrestrial invertebrates or plants.

Monitoring data indicate that exposure levels of M4Q in the environment are very low. The substance was below detection limits in sediment and biota samples, including those collected near potential M4Q sources of release. M4Q has been detected at low concentrations in some wastewater treatment plant influents and effluents, in some pre-treatment industrial process waters and in one landfill leachate. However, substantial reductions in effluent levels relative to those in influents indicate that wastewater treatment is effective at reducing the amount of M4Q available to enter receiving waters. The results of quantitative risk quotient analyses conducted for surface waters and sediment have shown that the highest predicted concentrations of M4Q in the Canadian environment are much lower than experimentally determined no-effect levels.

The low presence of M4Q in products, as well as limitations to its direct release from these products and evidence for effective removal at wastewater treatment plants, indicates that M4Q will have a low exposure potential in the environment. This low exposure, together with the observed lack of toxicity in laboratory testing conducted at concentrations up to the maximum solubility limit of the substance, indicates that there is low risk of harm to organisms or to the broader integrity of the environment from M4Q. It is therefore proposed to conclude that M4Q does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have immediate or long-term harmful effects on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

In terms of human health, exposure of the general population to M4Q is expected to occur mainly through use of paints, coatings, and cosmetics, including some personal care products.

Limited empirical health effects data were available about M4Q. Health effects data for analogues indicate potential effects mainly on the liver in experimental animals, following repeated-dose exposure. The margins between the upper-bound estimates of exposure from environmental media (predominantly air) and from the use of consumer products containing M4Q (cosmetics and alkyd coating) and the critical effect levels in experimental animals are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the adequacy of the margins between upper-bound estimates of exposure to M4Q and critical effect levels in experimental animals, it is proposed to conclude that M4Q is a substance that does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that M4Q does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The updated draft Screening Assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[13-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of 61 azo direct dyes and 8 azo reactive dyes specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 60 of the 61 azo direct dyes and 7 of the 8 azo reactive dyes identified in the annex below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft Screening Assessment conducted on 60 of the 61 azo direct dyes and 7 of the 8 azo reactive dyes pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on Direct Yellow 11 and Reactive Black 5 pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on Direct Yellow 11 and Reactive Black 5 at this time.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action under section 77 of the Act on the remaining 60 azo direct dyes and 7 reactive dyes at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-953-7155 (fax), substances@ec.gc.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of the Environment
AMANDA JANE PREECE
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate
On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Azo Direct Dyes and Azo Reactive Dyes

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on 61 azo direct dyes and 8 azo reactive dyes. These substances belong to the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping being assessed as part of the Substance Groupings Initiative of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP). They were identified as priorities for action as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 and/or were considered as priority substances under the CMP based on other human health concerns.

The identities of the 61 azo direct dyes and 8 azo reactive dyes are presented in tables S1 and S2.

Table S1: Identity of 61 azo direct dyes in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN (see reference a)

Domestic Substances List name

Colour Index name

1325-37-7 (see reference b), (see reference c)

C.I. Direct Yellow 11

Direct Yellow 11

1325-54-8 (see reference d)

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis-5-nitro-, disodium salt, reaction products with 4-[(4-aminophenyl)azo]benzenesulfonic acid, sodium salts

Direct Orange 39

2829-42-7

Benzoic acid, 3,3′-[carbonylbis(imino-4,1-phenyleneazo)]bis[6-hydroxy-, disodium salt

Direct Yellow 26

2870-32-8

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

Direct Yellow 12

3214-47-9

1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[carbonylbis[imino(2-methyl-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Yellow 50

3626-36-6

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-(phenylazo)-, disodium salt

Direct Orange 26

3687-80-7

1-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-[[1-hydroxy-6-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(2-methoxyphenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

Direct Red 26

4399-55-7

1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[[4-[(6-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Blue 71

5001-72-9

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-iminobis[4-hydroxy-3-(phenylazo)-, disodium salt

Direct Red 31

5489-77-0

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, disodium salt

Direct Violet 51

6406-87-7

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 5-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-8-[[4-(phenylazo)-7-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

N/A

6420-33-3

1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[carbonylbis[imino(5-methoxy-2-methyl-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Yellow 34

6420-41-3

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-[(6-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-, trisodium salt

Direct Red 4

6420-43-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(2-methylphenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-[(2-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-, trisodium salt

Direct Red 62

6471-09-6

Benzoic acid, 5-[[4-[[4-[[4-[(4-amino-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-3-sulfo-1-anthracenyl)amino]-2-sulfophenyl]amino]-6-(phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]phenyl]azo]-2-hydroxy-, trisodium salt

Direct Green 28

6476-10-4

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 8-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-5-[[4-(phenylazo)-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

N/A

10114-47-3

7-Benzothiazolesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(azodi-4,1-phenylene)bis[6-methyl-, disodium salt

Direct Yellow 28

10134-33-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 8-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-5-[[4-(phenylazo)-7-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

Direct Black 56

10482-42-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 5-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-8-[[4-(phenylazo)-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

N/A

12217-64-0

1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 7,7′-[carbonylbis[imino(5-methoxy-2-methyl-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis-, tetrasodium salt

Direct Orange 72

28706-21-0

1,3-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 7,7′-[iminobis[carbonyl(2-methyl-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis-, tetrasodium salt

N/A

32829-81-5

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[[4-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo]-, tetrasodium salt

N/A

38801-08-0

Benzoic acid, 4,4′-[carbonylbis[imino(1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-6,2-naphthalenediyl)azo]]bis-, compd. with 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris[ethanol] (1:4)

N/A

53523-90-3

Benzoic acid, 3,3′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis[6-hydroxy-5-methyl-, tetralithium salt

N/A

65150-80-3 (see reference e)

C.I. Direct Yellow 11, lithium salt

Direct Yellow 11 lithium salt

71033-21-1 (see reference f)

Benzothiazolesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(azodi-4,1-phenylene)bis[6-methyl-, disodium salt

N/A

71767-19-6

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 5-[[6-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-5-[(3-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-6-methoxy-8-[[7-sulfo-4-[(3-sulfophenyl)azo]-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, pentasodium salt

N/A

71873-49-9

Benzoic acid, 4,4′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)-ONN-azoxy-4,1-phenyleneazo]]bis-, tetrasodium salt

N/A

72139-21-0

Benzoic acid, 3,3′-[(1,4-dioxo-2-butene-1,4-diyl)bis(imino-4,1-phenyleneazo)]bis[6-hydroxy-, disodium salt

N/A

72152-50-2

Benzoic acid, 2-[[6-[[4-[[6-(benzoylamino)-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-3-methylbenzoyl]amino]-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-, trisodium salt

N/A

72245-49-9

Benzoic acid, 4-[[1-hydroxy-6-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(2-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

72245-56-8

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3-[[4-[[[4-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]carbonyl]phenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-, sodium salt

N/A

72749-87-2

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-[(2-methylphenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

N/A

72749-88-3

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-[(2-methoxyphenyl)azo]-, disodium salt

N/A

72869-93-3

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-[(6-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-, compd. with 2,2′-(methylimino)bis[ethanol] (1:4)

N/A

75150-14-0

1,4-Benzenedisulfonic acid, 2-[[4-[[4-[[1-hydroxy-6-(phenylamino)-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-6-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, ammonium sodium salt

N/A

75768-93-3

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7-(benzoylamino)-4-hydroxy-3-[[4-[(4-sulfophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo]-, compd. with 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris[ethanol] (1:2)

Direct Red 81 triethanolamine salt

83221-53-8

Benzoic acid, 5-[[4-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-2-hydroxy-, sodium salt

N/A

83221-54-9

Benzoic acid, 3-[[4-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-2-hydroxy-, sodium salt

N/A

83221-56-1

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-(phenylazo)-, sodium salt

N/A

83221-68-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]-3-[[4-[[4-[[7-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]phenyl]amino]-3-sulfophenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, trilithium salt

N/A

83221-69-6

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]-3-[[4-[[4-[[7-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]phenyl]amino]-3-sulfophenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

83221-72-1

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-3,6-bis[[4-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]phenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

83221-73-2

Benzoic acid, 4,4′-[carbonylbis[imino(1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-6,2-naphthalenediyl)azo]]bis-, sodium salt

N/A

83221-74-3

Benzoic acid, 4-[[1-hydroxy-6-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

83232-28-4

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[3-[[4-(acetylamino)phenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, sodium salt

N/A

83232-29-5

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-(acetylamino)phenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-(phenylazo)-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-, sodium salt

N/A

83232-30-8

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-[(2-methylphenyl)azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

83232-31-9

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7,7′-(carbonyldiimino)bis[4-hydroxy-3-[(2-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

83232-32-0

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 4-hydroxy-7-[[[[5-hydroxy-6-[(2-methylphenyl)azo]-7-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]-3-[(2-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

83783-94-2

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3,3′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis[5-amino-4-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt, compd. with 2,2′-(methylimino)bis[ethanol]

N/A

83783-95-3

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3,3′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis[6-amino-4-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt, compd. with 2,2′-(methylimino)bis[ethanol]

N/A

83783-96-4

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-amino-3-[[4-[2-[4-[(7-amino-1-hydroxy-3-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl)azo]-2-sulfophenyl]ethenyl]-3-sulfophenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt, compd. with 2,2′-(methylimino)bis[ethanol]

N/A

83783-99-7

Benzoic acid, 3,3′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis[6-hydroxy-5-methyl-, lithium sodium salt, compd. with 2,2′-(methylimino)bis[ethanol]

N/A

84878-16-0

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-6-[[4-[[4-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)azo]phenyl]thio]phenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-3-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-, sodium salt

N/A

84878-17-1

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-6-[[4-[[[4-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]sulfonyl]phenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-3-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-, potassium salt

N/A

85169-18-2

Glycine, N-[4-[[2-[4-[[1-amino-8-hydroxy-7-(phenylazo)-3,6-disulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]phenyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]azo]-3-hydroxyphenyl]-, compd. with 2,2′-iminobis[ethanol] (1:3)

N/A

85269-31-4

Benzoic acid, 3,3′-[1,2-ethenediylbis[(3-sulfo-4,1-phenylene)azo]]bis[6-hydroxy-5-methyl-, potassium salt, compd. with 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris[ethanol]

N/A

93803-37-3

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-3-[[4-[5-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]phenyl]azo]-6-(phenylazo)-, disodium salt

N/A

102082-94-0

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-6-[[4-[[[4-[(2,4-diaminophenyl)azo]phenyl]amino]sulfonyl]phenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-3-[(4-nitrophenyl)azo]-, lithium salt

N/A

110152-63-1

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azo]-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

Abbreviation: N/A, not available

Reference a
The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Reference b
This CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Reference c
This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority based on other human health concerns.

Reference d
This CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Reference e
This CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Reference f
This CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Table S2: Identity of eight azo reactive dyes in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Colour Index name

17095-24-8 (see reference g)

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-5-hydroxy-3,6-bis[[4-[[2-(sulfooxy)ethyl]sulfonyl]phenyl]azo]-, tetrasodium salt

Reactive Black 5

59641-46-2

2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 7-[[4-chloro- 6-[(3-sulfophenyl)amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-4-hydroxy-3-[(4-methoxy-2-sulfophenyl)azo]-

N/A

83399-85-3

1,4-Benzenedisulfonic acid, 2-[[4-[[4-[[(2,3- dichloro-6-quinoxalinyl)carbonyl]amino]-5-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]- 7-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

83400-10-6

1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 2-[[8-[[(2,3- dichloro-6-quinoxalinyl)carbonyl]amino]- 1-hydroxy-3,6-disulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

83400-11-7

1,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-(benzoylamino)-6-[[5-[[(5-chloro-2,6-difluoro-4-pyrimidinyl)amino]methyl]-1-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt

Reactive Black 158

83400-12-8

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 5-(benzoylamino)-3-[[5-[[(5-chloro-2,6-difluoro-4-pyrimidinyl)amino]methyl]-1-sulfo-2-naphthalenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-, lithium sodium salt

N/A

85586-78-3

1,5-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[[4-[(4-amino-6-chloro-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]-7-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-7-sulfo-1-naphthalenyl]azo]-, potassium sodium salt

N/A

108624-00-6

2,7-Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, 4-amino-6-[[5-[(5-chloro-2,6-difluoro-4-pyrimidinyl)amino]-2-sulfophenyl]azo]-5-hydroxy-3-[[4-[[2-(sulfooxy)ethyl]sulfonyl]phenyl]azo]-, lithium sodium salt

Reactive Blue 225

Abbreviation: N/A, not available

Reference g
This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

Azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes are not expected to occur naturally in the environment. No manufacture of any substance above the 100 kg/year reporting threshold has been reported in Canada in response to any recent surveys under section 71 of CEPA 1999. Seven substances (six azo direct dyes and one azo reactive dye) have been reported as having an import quantity above the 100 kg/year survey reporting threshold. Azo direct dyes are generally used for colouring of paper and textile materials. Azo reactive dyes are used primarily in the textiles industry for dyeing cellulosic fibres such as cotton and rayon.

Environment

All azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes are soluble in water, with solubility generally well above 1 g/L. Given the import and use of six azo direct dyes and one azo reactive dye in Canada above the reporting threshold, potential releases to the aquatic environment have been estimated. Considering potential releases to water, sediment and soil and the physical and chemical properties of these substances, it is expected that the azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes may remain in the water column for relatively long periods of time due to their hydrophilicity, but will ultimately partition via electrostatic interactions to suspended solids, sediments or soil particles. Available experimental and modelled data regarding the abiotic and biotic degradation of the azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes indicate that these substances are persistent in water, sediment and soil. In anaerobic environments (e.g. anoxic layers of sediments), there is the potential for these substances to degrade to aromatic amines as a result of cleavage of the azo bond under anaerobic or reducing conditions.

Although there are limited experimental data available, information on the log octanol–water partition coefficients and fish bioconcentration factors indicates that these substances are not likely to bioconcentrate or bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms.

There is a wide range of acute toxicity data for azo direct dyes (median lethal concentrations [LC50s] ranging from 75 to ≥ 1 000 mg/L). The lowest LC50 of 75 mg/L was observed in rainbow trout at 48 hours. Azo reactive dyes were found to elicit effects in aquatic organisms at low concentrations. The aquatic invertebrate Daphnia magna was found to be more sensitive than the various fish species tested. The differences were even more pronounced when the length of exposure (up to 21 days) was increased. Daphnid reproduction was found to be the most sensitive endpoint, with a 21-day no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) of 1.25 and 2.5 mg/L, respectively. Soil and sediment toxicity data are not available for these substances.

Aquatic exposure analyses were conducted for scenarios representing potential major environmental releases due to industrial activities involving azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were calculated for the aquatic environment for those substances used in chemical formulations, paper dyeing and textile dyeing. The likelihood of the PECs exceeding the predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes was found to be low.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from azo direct dyes and azo reactive dyes. It is proposed to conclude that the 61 azo direct dyes and the 8 azo reactive dyes in this assessment do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or 64(b) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Human health

Azo direct dyes

Exposure of the general population of Canada to azo direct dyes from environmental media is considered to be negligible. The general population may be exposed to 18 of the 61 azo direct dyes identified as being present in products in the Canadian marketplace. Exposure to Direct Red 31, Direct Yellow 12 and Direct Yellow 50 may occur through contact with textile materials and leather and paper products; exposure to Direct Black 56, Direct Red 81 triethanolamine salt, and dyes bearing CAS RN 28706-21-0, 71033-21-1, 83221-56-1 and 84878-17-1 may occur through contact with textile materials and leather products; exposure to Direct Green 28, Direct Orange 26, Direct Orange 39, Direct Violet 51 and Direct Yellow 28 may occur through contact with textile materials; and exposure to Direct Blue 71, Direct Yellow 34, Direct Yellow 11 and Direct Yellow 11 lithium salt may occur through contact with paper products. Exposure to Direct Blue 71 and Direct Yellow 11 lithium salt in food packaging materials is considered negligible.

A range of no-observed-adverse-effect levels identified from repeated-dose toxicity studies for Direct Orange 39 and analogues were used as the point of departure (POD) to characterize the human health risk for 14 azo direct dyes (Direct Black 56, Direct Green 28, Direct Orange 26, Direct Orange 39, Direct Red 81 triethanolamine salt, Direct Violet 51, Direct Yellow 28, Direct Red 31, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Yellow 50, and dyes bearing CAS RN 28706-21-0, 71033-21-1, 83221-56-1 and 84878-17-1) potentially used as dyes in textiles. Margins between the upper-bounding estimates of oral and dermal exposure to the 14 dyes in textiles and the POD for the repeated-dose toxicity were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the databases of exposure and health effects.

Exposure to nine azo direct dyes (Direct Black 56, Direct Red 31, Direct Red 81 triethanolamine salt, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Yellow 50, and dyes bearing CAS RN 28706-21-0, 71033-21-1, 83221-56-1 and 84878-17-1) potentially used as dyes in leather products is considered short term and intermittent. Therefore, the margins of exposure derived for textiles are considered to be protective for individuals wearing leather.

Risk to human health from incidental oral exposure to 7 of the 61 azo direct dyes (Direct Blue 71, Direct Red 31, Direct Yellow 11, Direct Yellow 11 lithium salt, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Yellow 34 and Direct Yellow 50) used as dyes in paper products is expected to be low, as available information indicates that the azo direct dyes do not possess high acute toxicity.

Risk to human health from exposure to Direct Blue 71 and Direct Yellow 11 lithium salt in food packaging materials is not expected, as the exposure from these materials is considered negligible.

Risk to human health for the remaining 43 azo direct dyes is not expected, as exposure of the general population to these 43 substances in Canada has not been identified.

Based on the available information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the 61 azo direct dyes evaluated in this assessment are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

It is therefore proposed to conclude that the above 61 substances do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999.

Azo reactive dyes

Exposure of the general population of Canada to azo reactive dyes from environmental media is expected to be negligible. Exposure to three azo reactive dyes (Reactive Black 5, Reactive Black 158 and Reactive Blue 225) potentially used as covalently bound dyes in textiles is considered negligible. Accordingly, risk to human health from exposure to these three dyes is not expected. Risk to human health from exposure to the remaining five azo reactive dyes from consumer products is not expected, as general population exposure to these substances has not been indicated.

Based on the available information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that the eight azo reactive dyes evaluated in this assessment are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

It is therefore proposed to conclude that the above eight substances do not meet the criteria set out in paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that the 61 azo direct dyes and 8 azo reactive dyes do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

Considerations for follow-up

Seven azo direct dyes are considered to have high human health hazard potential based on the potential carcinogenicity and/or genotoxicity of three aromatic amines (o-toluidine, o-anisidine and 4,4′-thiobisbenzenamine) that may be released from these dyes following azo bond cleavage. o-Toluidine may be released from Direct Red 62, dyes bearing CAS RN 72749-87-2, 83232-30-8 and 83232-32-0; o-anisidine may be released from Direct Red 26 and the dye bearing CAS RN 72749-88-3; and 4,4′-thiobisbenzenamine may be released from the dye bearing CAS RN 84878-16-0. Exposure of the general population of Canada to these seven substances is not currently expected. However, there may be human health concerns if uses resulting in general population exposure were to increase in Canada, as these substances pose a high human health hazard. To ensure consistency across this grouping, options on how best to monitor changes in the use profile of these seven substances, such as monitoring of international activities or surveillance of the Canadian marketplace, will be investigated as the assessments for all of the substances in the Aromatic Azo and Benzidine-based Substance Grouping are completed.

The draft screening assessment is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[13-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of 117 substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas 114 of the 117 substances identified in Annex 1 below are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the final Screening Assessment Report of 117 substances conducted pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment the Minister and of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment

RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX 1

Substances Identified as not Meeting the Criteria under Section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

CAS RN (see reference h)

Domestic Substances List name

Potential SNAc candidate (and basis for concern)

56-49-5

Benz[j]aceanthrylene, 1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-

 

78-13-7

Silicic acid (H4SiO4), tetrakis(2-ethylbutyl) ester

 

86-74-8

9H-Carbazole

 

87-62-7

Benzenamine, 2,6-dimethyl-

Yes (Health)

99-09-2

Benzenamine, 3-nitro-

 

108-44-1

Benzenamine, 3-methyl-

 

112-76-5

Octadecanoyl chloride

 

120-95-6

Phenol, 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylpropyl)-

 

121-19-7

Arsonic acid, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)-

 

127-85-5

Arsonic acid, (4-aminophenyl)-, monosodium salt

 

150-68-5 (see reference i)

Urea, N′-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-

Yes (Health)

507-28-8

Arsonium, tetraphenyl-, chloride

Yes (Ecological)

543-90-8

Acetic acid, cadmium salt

 

553-72-0

Benzoic acid, zinc salt

 

554-00-7

Benzenamine, 2,4-dichloro-

 

557-09-5

Octanoic acid, zinc salt

 

557-21-1

Zinc cyanide (Zn(CN)2)

 

557-28-8

Propanoic acid, zinc salt

 

603-32-7

Arsine, triphenyl-

 

637-03-6

Arsine, oxophenyl-

 

1153-05-5

Arsine oxide, triphenyl-

 

1191-79-3

Octadecanoic acid, barium cadmium salt (4:1:1)

 

2191-10-8

Octanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

2223-93-0

Octadecanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

2605-44-9

Dodecanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

3026-22-0

Benzoic acid, cadmium salt

 

4167-05-9

Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, cadmium salt

 

4454-16-4

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, nickel(2++) salt

Yes (Health)

4980-54-5

Benzoic acid, 4-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-, zinc salt

 

4995-91-9

Octanoic acid, nickel(2++) salt

Yes (Health)

5530-30-3

Phenol, 4-butyl-2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-

 

6362-80-7

Benzene, 1,1′-(1,1-dimethyl-3-methylene-1,3-propanediyl)bis-

 

6427-86-7

Hexadecanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

7580-31-6

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, nickel salt

Yes (Health)

7647-18-9

Antimony chloride (SbCl5)

 

7779-86-4

Dithionous acid, zinc salt (1:1)

 

10196-67-5

Tetradecanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

10468-30-1

9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, cadmium salt

 

10595-60-5

1,2-Ethanediamine, N-(1,3-dimethylbutylidene)-N′-[2-[(1,3-dimethylbutylidene)amino]ethyl]-

Yes (Ecological)

11071-15-1

Antimonate(2-), bis[µ-[2,3-dihydroxybutanedioato(4-)-O1,O2:O3,O4]]di-, dipotassium, stereoisomer

 

11112-10-0

Antimony sodium oxide

 

13438-45-4

Benzenesulfonic acid, 4-methyl-, zinc salt

 

13497-94-4

Silver vanadium oxide (AgVO3)

 

14024-63-6

Zinc, bis(2,4-pentanedionato-O,O′)-, (T-4)-

 

14239-68-0

Cadmium, bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-, (T-4)-

Yes (Ecological)

14263-89-9

Benzenediazonium, 4-chloro-2-nitro-, tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

 

14516-71-3

Nickel, (1-butanamine)[[2,2′-thiobis[4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenolato]](2-)-O,O′,S]-

 

14639-97-5

Zincate(2-), tetrachloro-, diammonium, (T-4)-

 

14639-98-6

Zincate(3-), pentachloro-, triammonium

 

15317-78-9

Nickel, bis[bis(2-methylpropyl)carbamodithioato-S,S′]-, (SP-4-1)-

 

15521-65-0

Nickel, bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-, (SP-4-1)-

 

15337-60-7

Dodecanoic acid, barium cadmium salt

 

15751-00-5

Nickel(2++), hexakis(1H-imidazole-N3)-, dichloride, (OC-6-11)-

 

15874-52-9

Phosphorodithioic acid, O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester, antimony(3++) salt

 

18015-76-4 (see reference j)

Methanaminium, N-[4-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]phenylmethylene]-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-N-methyl-, ethanedioate

Yes (Health)

19900-65-3 (see reference k)

Benzenamine, 4,4′-methylenebis[2-ethyl-

Yes (Health)

20437-10-9

Nickel, [[1,1′-[1,2-phenylenebis(nitrilo-methylidyne)]bis[2-naphthalenolato]](2-)-N,N′,O,O′]-, (SP-4-2)-

 

24345-02-6

Benzenesulfinic acid, 4-methyl-, zinc salt

 

25168-05-2

Benzene, chloromethyl-

 

25537-17-1

Phosphonic acid, (1-hydroxyethylidene)bis-, zinc salt

 

25640-78-2

1,1′-Biphenyl, (1-methylethyl)-

 

27251-75-8

1,2,4-Benzenetricarboxylic acid, triisooctyl ester

 

27288-44-4

Acetic acid, mercapto-, isooctyl ester, antimony(3++) salt

 

27342-69-4

Cyclotetrasiloxane, tetraethenyltetramethyl-

 

27574-34-1

Nickel, [[2,2′-thiobis[4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenolato]](2-)-O,O′,S]-

 

28214-91-7

Naphthalenesulfonic acid, dinonyl-, lithium salt

 

29204-84-0

Nickel, bis[2,3-bis(hydroxyimino)-N-phenylbutanamidato-N2,N3]-

 

30172-67-9

Benzene, bis(phenylmethyl)-

 

30260-72-1

Benzenesulfonic acid, dodecyl(sulfophenoxy)-

 

30947-30-9

Phosphonic acid, [[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]methyl]-, monoethyl ester, nickel(2++) salt (2:1)

 

33684-80-9

Methanesulfonic acid, zinc salt

 

38656-51-8

Benzenediazonium, 2,5-diethoxy-4-[(4-methylphenyl)thio]-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

 

39455-80-6

Ammonium sodium vanadium oxide

 

42405-40-3

Zinc, bis[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-2-hydroxybenzoato-O1,O2]-, (T-4)-

 

43126-83-6

tert-Dodecanethiol, silver(1++) salt

 

49757-42-8

Benzene, 1,1′,1″-(chloromethylidyne)tris[4-methoxy-

Yes (Ecological)

50594-66-6

Benzoic acid, 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitro-

 

50851-34-8

Benzene, dimethylbis(phenylmethyl)-

 

51731-04-5

Octadecanoic acid, zinc salt, basic

 

52108-54-0

Phosphoric acid, 2-ethylhexyl ester, zinc salt

 

52434-90-9

1,3,5-Triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione, 1,3,5-tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)-

Yes (Ecological)

52572-38-0

Benzenediazonium, 3-methyl-4(1-pyrrolidinyl)-, trichlorozincate(1-)

 

55700-14-6

Cyclohexanebutanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

57866-49-6

Lignosulfonic acid, zinc salt

 

60580-61-2

1,3-Benzenedicarboxylic acid, 5-nitro-, zinc salt (1:1)

 

61789-34-2

Naphthenic acids, cadmium salts

 

61951-96-0

Neodecanoic acid, cadmium salt

 

63568-30-9

Naphthalenesulfonic acid, diisononyl-, lead(2++) salt

 

63589-47-9

Phenoxazin-5-ium, 3,7-bis(diethylamino)-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

 

65046-95-9

Zinc, bis(2-methoxybenzoato-O1,O2)-, (T-4)-

 

68092-45-5

Benzoic acid, 3-methyl-, cadmium salt

 

68092-46-6

Benzoic acid, 3-methyl-, zinc salt

 

68442-22-8

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(2-ethylhexyl and iso-Bu) esters, zinc salts

 

68478-53-5

Cadmium, benzoate p-tert-butylbenzoate complexes

 

68512-49-2

Cadmium zinc sulfide ((Cd,Zn)S), copper chloride-doped

 

68540-77-2

1-Anthracenediazonium, 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-, chloride, compd. with zinc chloride (ZnCl2)

 

68611-72-3

Zinc, C6-19-branched carboxylate naphthenate complexes

 

68815-09-8

Naphthenic acids, vanadium salts

 

68988-46-5

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(iso-Bu and isooctyl and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

 

68988-62-5

Zinc, benzoate p-tert-butylbenzoate complexes

 

69121-20-6

Octadecanoic acid, 12-hydroxy-, cadmium salt (2:1)

 

69304-37-6

Disiloxane, 1,3-dichloro-1,1,3,3-tetrakis(1-methylethyl)-

Yes (Ecological)

71889-22-0

Nickel, [µ-(piperazine-N1:N4)]bis[3-[1-[(4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-1-oxo-1H-isoindol-3-yl)hydrazono]ethyl]-2,4(1H,3H)-quinolinedionato(2-)]di

 

72102-51-3

3H-Indolium, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-1,3,3-trimethyl-, trichlorozincate(1-)

 

72333-14-3

Benzenediazonium, 2-chloro-5-(4-chlorophenoxy)-4-(diethylamino)-, (T-4)-tetrachlorozincate(2-) (2:1)

 

73003-83-5

Arsonium, tetraphenyl-, chloride, compd. with hydrochloric acid (1:1)

Yes (Ecological)

77245-35-3

Nickel, bis[[didecyl (1,2-dicyano-1,2-ethenediyl)bis[carbamato]](2-)]-

 

84370-79-6

tert-Decanoic acid, zinc salt

 

85203-81-2

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, zinc salt, basic

 

85298-60-8

Zinc, bis(diisononylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-

 

85298-61-9

Nickel, bis(diisononylcarbamodithioato-S,S′)-

 

92221-02-8

Vanadium, tetrachloro(2-pyridinamine-N1)-

 

101747-77-7

Phosphorodithioic acid, mixed O,O-bis(iso-Bu and iso-Pr and pentyl) esters, zinc salts

 

114792-68-6

Benzene, trimethylbis(phenylmethyl)-

Yes (Ecological)

125275-86-7

Nickelate(1-), (formato-O) [sulfato(2-)-O]-, hydrogen

 

125275-87-8

Nickelate(1-), (acetato-O) [sulfato(2-)-O]-, hydrogen

 

125494-58-8

Zinc, C9-28-neocarboxylate 2-ethylhexanoate naphthenate complexes

 

Abbreviation: SNAc, Significant New Activity as described in subsection 81(3) of CEPA 1999

Reference h
The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Reference i
This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

Reference j
This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

Reference k
This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999 but was included in this assessment as it was considered as a priority based on other human health concerns.

ANNEX 2

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on 117 Substances on the Domestic Substances List

As part of the Government of Canada’s Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), a section 71 notice for the first phase of the Domestic Substances List (DSL) inventory update initiative was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, in October 2009 to collect data on approximately 500 substances. As a result of the data collected, 140 substances were identified as candidates for rapid screening.

Following the application of a rapid screening approach to these 140 substances that were prioritized for assessment during the categorization of the Domestic Substances List, the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on and reached final conclusions for 117 of these substances pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999).

The majority of the 140 substances met the categorization criteria for “greatest potential for exposure” (GPE) to humans or for persistence or bioaccumulation and inherent toxicity to human or non-human organisms (PiT or BiT) under subsection 73(1) of CEPA 1999. Additional substances considered in this assessment had been identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity.

The substances included in this report were candidates for rapid screening because they were identified as being in commerce across Canada at a total of ≤ 1 000 kg/year according to information submitted pursuant to section 71 of CEPA 1999 regarding commercial activity in Canada under Phase One of the DSL Inventory Update.

A rapid screening approach was applied, which involved using conservative assumptions to identify substances that warrant further evaluation of their potential to cause harm to either human health or the environment, and those that are expected to have a low likelihood of causing harmful ecological or human health effects.

The ecological component of the rapid screening approach consisted of two main steps to identify substances that warrant further evaluation of their potential to cause harm. The first step involved applying different exposure scenarios using assumptions that are protective of the environment. The second step involved a mechanical process to identify whether or not a substance appears on any of a wide range of lists or in sources of information relating to ecological hazards or exposure. This step flagged substances that have been identified by domestic or international initiatives as possibly being of greater concern due to their ecological hazard properties or elevated potential for environmental release.

The human health component of the rapid screening approach consisted of a process to determine whether the substance warrants further assessment from a human health perspective. A key element of the characterization of potential risk for human health is determination of the potential for exposure to the general population. Substances reported to be in commerce in Canada at ≤ 1 000 kg/year are considered to warrant further assessment if there is evidence of direct exposure (e.g. exposure from products or food additives) of the general population in Canada. If the potential for exposure is considered to be negligible for a substance, it is concluded that that substance is unlikely to cause harm to human health at current levels of exposure.

In total, 23 substances were identified as requiring further assessment (9 identified for ecological and human health considerations, 13 identified for human health considerations only, and 1 identified for ecological considerations only). For the remaining 117 substances, this rapid screening approach indicated that current use patterns and quantities in commerce are unlikely to result in concerns for organisms or the broader integrity of the environment, or for human health in Canada. All in-commerce substances had calculated generic aquatic exposure values below the level of concern. Furthermore, application of the mechanical filters did not identify any additional ecological concerns.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this Screening Assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from the 117 substances identified in Annex 1. It is concluded that the 117 substances do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

From a human health perspective, indirect or direct exposure to the general population through environmental media (air, water, soil) to these 117 substances is expected to be negligible and, therefore, the substances are unlikely to cause harm to human health at current levels of exposure.

Based on the information presented in the Screening Assessment, it is concluded that the 117 substances listed in Annex 1 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999 as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Because these 117 substances are listed on the Domestic Substances List, their import and manufacture in Canada are not subject to notification under subsection 81(1) of CEPA 1999. Since 15 are recognized for their hazardous properties, there is concern that new activities that have not been identified or assessed could lead to these substances meeting the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999. Therefore, it is recommended to amend the Domestic Substances List, under subsection 87(3) of the Act, to indicate that the significant new activity (SNAc) provisions under subsection 81(3) of the Act apply with respect to the substances.

The SNAc provisions trigger an obligation for industry to declare, and for the Government to assess, information about a substance when a proponent proposes to use the substance in a significant new activity. The provisions are used to assess the risks associated with the proposed new activity before the new activity is undertaken. The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health assess the information provided by the notifier and other information available to them to determine whether the substance, if used in the proposed new activity, could pose a risk to the environment or human health, and, if so, whether new or additional risk management is required. The notice of intent to apply the significant new activity provisions to 15 substances covered under the current rapid screening approach will be developed later in 2014 in consultation with industry stakeholders.

Conclusion

It is concluded that the 117 substances listed in Annex 1 do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The Screening Assessment is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[13-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Decisions, undertakings and orders on claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of the decisions of the screening officer, respecting each claim for exemption and the relevant material safety data sheet (MSDS) and (where applicable) the label, listed below.

In accordance with section 20 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, a claimant or any affected party may appeal a decision or order of a screening officer. An affected party may also appeal an undertaking in respect of which a notice has been published in the Canada Gazette. “Affected party” means a person who is not a competitor of the claimant and who uses, supplies or is otherwise involved in the use or supply of the controlled product at a work place, and includes

  • (a) a supplier of the controlled product;
  • (b) an employee at the work place;
  • (c) an employer at the work place;
  • (d) a safety and health professional for the work place;
  • (e) a safety and health representative or a member of a safety and health committee for the work place; and
  • (f) a person who is authorized in writing to represent
    • (i) a supplier referred to in paragraph (a) or an employer referred to in paragraph (c), or
    • (ii) an employee referred to in paragraph (b), except where that person is an official or a representative of a trade union that is not certified or recognized in respect of the work place.

To initiate the appeal process, a Statement of Appeal (Form 1) as prescribed by the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act Appeal Board Procedures Regulations must be completed and delivered, along with the fee prescribed by section 12 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations, within 45 days of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the Chief Appeals Officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate, 427 Laurier Avenue West, 7th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

STEPHANIE REID
Chief Screening Officer

Claimant

Product Identifier (As shown on the MSDS)

Registry Number

Date of Decision

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

9845 Process Yellow

8208

2013-10-15

Cansolv Technologies Inc., Montréal, Quebec

CANSOLV™ Absorbent DM

8422

2013-10-18

Sealed Air Corporation, Brampton, Ontario

INSTAPAK® -40W COMPONENT “B”

8428

2013-10-08

Sealed Air Corporation, Brampton, Ontario

INSTAPAK® -50W COMPONENT “B”

8429

2013-10-08

Sealed Air Corporation, Brampton, Ontario

INSTAPAK® -75W COMPONENT “B”

8430

2013-10-08

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M Scotchkote Epoxy Coating 152LV (Part B)

8471

2013-11-07

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

HiTEC® 6311 Performance Additive

8510

2013-12-20

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

ACTRENE® EC3267A

8530

2013-11-25

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

EnterFast® EC9010G

8532

2013-11-25

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Silcat* RHS silane

8548

2013-12-16

Momentive Performance Materials, Markham, Ontario

Silcat* VS-835 silane

8549

2013-12-16

BASF Canada Inc., Mississauga, Ontario

Plurafac® LF 900

8558

2013-10-07

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

Clean n Cor® EC1509A

8559

2013-10-15

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

SCOTCH-WELDTM STRUCTURAL ADHESIVE 8010 NS (PART B)

8578

2013-11-08

Afton Chemical Corporation, Richmond, Virginia

HiTEC 11118 Performance Additive

8582

2013-12-20

3M Canada Company, London, Ontario

3M(TM) SCREEN PRINTABLE ADHESIVE SP-7555

8612

2013-10-31

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 3133-35

8619

2013-12-17

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

NALCO® EC1021A

8623

2013-10-08

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

TOXIMUL 3404F

8627

2013-12-17

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 2337-92A

8628

2013-12-17

Stepan Company, Northfield, Illinois

AGENT 2337-92N

8629

2013-12-17

Univar Canada Ltd., Richmond, British Columbia

Inflo 200

8648

2013-11-27

MeadWestvaco Corporation - Specialty Chemicals Division, North Charleston, South Carolina

INDULIN® QTS (CANADA)

8655

2013-10-22

MeadWestvaco Corporation - Specialty Chemicals Division, North Charleston, South Carolina

INDULIN® SBT

8656

2013-11-22

MeadWestvaco Corporation - Specialty Chemicals Division, North Charleston, South Carolina

INDULIN® W-5

8657

2013-11-22

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

LIFESPAN™ 3207C CRUDE COMPATIBILITY AID

8663

2013-11-26

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

TOLAD™ 9719 ADDITIVE

8664

2013-11-27

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® MNA-8011

8669

2013-12-24

ChemTreat Inc., Glen Allen, Virginia

ChemTreat SD176

8671

2013-11-28

Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, Michigan

DOW CORNING® Z-6173 FILLER DISPERSION AID

8684

2013-10-08

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE WM-5011

8685

2013-12-24

Nalco Canada Co., Burlington, Ontario

NALCO® EC6747A

8690

2013-12-06

Calfrac Well Services Ltd., Calgary, Alberta

DAP-121

8691

2013-11-08

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

PAO2343 ASPHALTENE INHIBITOR

8727

2013-12-13

E.I. du Pont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Capstone® ST-300 Protector

8735

2013-12-16

E.I. du Pont Canada Company, Mississauga, Ontario

Capstone® FS-63 Fluorosurfactant

8736

2013-12-16

GE Water & Process Technologies, Oakville, Ontario

POWERTREAT FD9068

8744

2013-12-16

Cytec Industries Inc., Woodland Park, New Jersey

AERO® 855 Promoter

8746

2013-10-28

Mid-Continental Dental Supply Co. Ltd., Headingley, Manitoba

17789456

8754

2013-12-05

Baker Petrolite Corp., Sugar Land, Texas

CRW9220 CORROSION INHIBITOR

8789

2013-12-18

Cytec Industries Inc., Woodland Park, New Jersey

BR® 127 Corrosion Inhibiting Primer

8790

2013-10-28

Glori Canada Ltd., Houston, Texas

MM 3000-A Series FR

8791

2013-11-21

BYK USA Inc., Wallingford, Connecticut

BYK-W 9010

8793

2013-12-09

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® WM-1107

8805

2013-12-02

Hydro Technologies (Canada) Inc., Québec, Quebec

HY BRITE® WF-9020

8845

2013-12-02

NOTES:

  1. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on May 21, 2011, listed the product identifier for the product bearing Registry Number 8208 to be 3M(TM) Screen Printing UV Ink Series 9845 Process Yellow. The product identifier for the product on which the screening officer issued the decision is 9845 Process Yellow.
  2. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on February 18, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8430 to be the chemical identity of two ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of one ingredient.
  3. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, for the product bearing Registry Number 8510, listed the product identifier to be HiTEC 6311 Performance Additive and the subject of the claim to be the chemical identity of six ingredients. The product identifier and the subject of the claim for the product on which the screening officer issued the decision are HiTEC® 6311 Performance Additive and the chemical identity of four ingredients, respectively.
  4. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on July 30, 2011, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8532 to be the chemical identity of three ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of two ingredients.
  5. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, for the product bearing Registry Number 8548, listed the product identifier to be Silcat® RHS Silane and the subject of the claim to be the chemical identity of one ingredient. The product identifier and the subject of the claim for the product on which the screening officer issued the decision are Silcat* RHS silane and the chemical identity of two ingredients, respectively.
  6. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, for the product bearing Registry Number 8549, listed the product identifier to be Silcat® VS-835 Silane and the subject of the claim to be the chemical identity of one ingredient. The product identifier and the subject of the claim for the product on which the screening officer issued the decision are Silcat* VS-835 silane and the chemical identity of two ingredients, respectively.
  7. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8559 to be the chemical identity of five ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of four ingredients.
  8. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8578 to be the chemical identity of one ingredient. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of two ingredients.
  9. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on April 28, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8582 to be the chemical identity of one ingredient. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of two ingredients.
  10. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on June 30, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8619 to be the chemical identity and concentration of three ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of two ingredients.
  11. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on September 22, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Numbers 8656 and 8657 to be the chemical identity of three ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of two ingredients.
  12. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on September 22, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8663 to be the chemical identity of two ingredients and concentration of three ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity and concentration of two ingredients.
  13. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on December 1, 2012, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8746 to be the chemical identity of one ingredient. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of three ingredients.
  14. The Notice of Filing published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on February 23, 2013, listed the subject of the claim bearing Registry Number 8791 to be the chemical identity of three ingredients. The subject of the claim on which the screening officer issued the decision is the chemical identity of one ingredient.

There were no written representations from affected parties to the screening officer with respect to any of the above-mentioned claims for exemption and related MSDSs or labels.

Each of the claims for exemption listed above was found to be valid. The screening officer reached this decision after reviewing the information in support of the claim, having regard exclusively to the criteria found in section 3 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations.

Having regard for the various data readily available in the literature and any information provided by the claimant, the screening officer found that the respective MSDSs in respect of the claims bearing Registry Numbers 8428, 8429, 8664, 8669, 8685, 8727, 8805 and 8845 complied with the applicable requirements of the Hazardous Products Act and the Controlled Products Regulations.

In all cases where the MSDS or the label was determined not to be in compliance with the relevant legislation, the screening officer offered the claimant the possibility of entering into an undertaking whereby the claimant would voluntarily make the changes necessary to bring the MSDS or the label into compliance. Pursuant to subsection 16.1(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the claimant was given 30 days to provide the screening officer with a signed undertaking accompanied by the MSDS or the label amended as necessary.

In the case of the following claims, the claimant supplied the screening officer with a signed undertaking accompanied by the MSDS or label amended as necessary within the time frame specified. The screening officer was satisfied that the claimant had taken the measures set out in the undertaking in the manner and within the period specified therein.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER WAS SATISFIED THAT THE CLAIMANT HAD TAKEN THE MEASURES SET OUT IN THE UNDERTAKING

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(b) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of information that has been disclosed on the relevant MSDS or label in compliance with an undertaking.

Registry Number 8208

Date of notice confirming acceptance: October 28, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose the presence of an additional hazardous ingredient in the controlled product in an acceptable manner.

Registry Number 8422

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 15, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose an ACGIH TLV–TWA Exposure Limit for the confidential hazardous ingredient “cyclic amine” in an acceptable manner.

Registry Number 8430

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 6, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS.

Registry Number 8471

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 10, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: should vomiting occur naturally, have the casualty lean forward in order to reduce the risk of aspiration.
  3. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 580 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “nonylphenol”.
  4. Disclose an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of 2 g/kg for the hazardous ingredient “nonylphenol”.
  5. Disclose an LC50 (vapour, male rat, 4 hours) value of 117 mg/L for the hazardous ingredient “ethyl alcohol”.
  6. Disclose that ingredients in the controlled product have been shown to cause mutagenic effects in vitro, as well as fetotoxic or reproductive effects in the presence of maternal toxicity in humans and in laboratory animals.
  7. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause synergistic effects with “N-butyraldoxime” causing drowsiness, shortness of breath and palpitations in humans.
  8. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in class D1B.
Registry Number 8530

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 23, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose that dermal exposure to an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause central nervous system (CNS) effects in laboratory animals.

Registry Number 8532

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 7, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 7 050 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “heavy aromatic naphtha”.

Registry Number 8548

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 20, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause skin corrosion.
  2. Disclose the presence of an additional confidential hazardous ingredient in the controlled product together with its percent concentration, in an acceptable manner.
  3. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: do not induce vomiting but if vomiting should occur naturally have the casualty lie on their side, in the recovery position.
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  5. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for inhalation, disclose a statement to the effect that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  6. Disclose a statement to the effect that the product should be stored in a well-ventilated, cool, and dry location away from any ignition sources.
  7. Add oxides of nitrogen to the list of hazardous decomposition products.
  8. Disclose an LD50 (oral, male rat) value of 7.34 mL/kg and an LD50 (dermal, female rabbit) value of 3.36 mL/kg for the hazardous ingredient “vinyltrimethoxysilane”.
  9. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of >500 mg/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “organic peroxide”.
  10. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 0.133 mL/kg for the hazardous ingredient “dibutyltin dilaureate”.
  11. Disclose that the hazardous ingredient “vinyltrimethoxy-silane” in the controlled product has been shown to cause skin sensitization in laboratory animals.
Registry Number 8549

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 20, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause skin corrosion.
  2. Disclose the presence of an additional confidential hazardous ingredient in the controlled product together with its percent concentration, in an acceptable manner.
  3. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: do not induce vomiting, but if vomiting should occur naturally, have the casualty lie on their side, in the recovery position.
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  5. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for inhalation, disclose a statement to the effect that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  6. Disclose a statement to the effect that metal containers should be grounded during the transfer of large quantities of the controlled product and that the product should be stored in a well-ventilated, cool, and dry location away from any ignition sources.
  7. Add oxides of nitrogen to the list of hazardous decomposition products.
  8. Disclose an LD50 (oral, male rat) value of 7.34 mL/kg and an LD50 (dermal, female rabbit) value of 3.36 mL/kg for the hazardous ingredient “vinyltrimethoxysilane”.
  9. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of >500 mg/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “organic peroxide”.
  10. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 0.133 mL/kg for the hazardous ingredient “dibutyltin dilaureate”.
  11. Disclose that the hazardous ingredient “vinyltrimethoxysilane” in the controlled product has been shown to cause skin sensitization in laboratory animals.
  12. Amend the MSDS to include the instructions “Consult local, provincial and federal agencies for proper methods of disposal”.
Registry Number 8558

Date of notice confirming acceptance: October 17, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Add oxides of carbon to the list of hazardous decomposition products.

Registry Number 8559

Date of notice confirming acceptance: October 31, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS.

Registry Number 8578

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 10, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, remove the statement to give two glasses of water to drink.
  2. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in class D1A.
Registry Number 8612

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 10, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, remove the statement to give two glasses of water to drink.
  2. Add hydrogen chloride to the list of hazardous combustion products.
  3. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 1 694 mg/kg and an LD50 (dermal, rat) value of 6 929 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “hydroxymethylphenyl propanone”.
Registry Number 8619

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 17, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Add oxides of carbon to the list of hazardous decomposition products.

Registry Number 8623

Date of notice confirming acceptance: October 31, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose the acute lethality values with greater precision.

Registry Number 8627

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 17, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that acute dermal exposure to an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause central nervous system (CNS) effects in laboratory animals.
  2. Disclose that acute inhalation of an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause blurred vision and central nervous system (CNS) effects in humans.
  3. Disclose that ingestion of an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause coma and death in humans and central nervous system (CNS) effects in laboratory animals.
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 20 minutes or until the chemical is removed.
  5. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  6. Add oxides of carbon to the list of hazardous combustion products.
  7. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 9 890 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “methanol”.
  8. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of >500 mg/kg and an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of >1 000 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “non-ionic ethoxylate”.
  9. Disclose an LD50 (oral, female rat) value of 720 mg/kg and an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of 2 330 mg/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “1-Hexanol”.
  10. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 7 050 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “solvent naphtha, petroleum, heavy arom”.
  11. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 8 400 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “solvent naphtha, petroleum, light arom”.
  12. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause teratogenic effects in the absence of maternal toxicity in laboratory animals.
  13. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in classes D1B and D2A.
Registry Numbers 8628 and 8629

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 17, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that acute dermal exposure to an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause central nervous system (CNS) effects in laboratory animals.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 20 minutes or until the chemical is removed.
  3. Disclose an LD50 (oral, female rat) value of 720 mg/kg and an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of 2 330 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “1-Hexanol”.
  4. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 7 050 mg/kg for the hazardous ingredient “solvent naphtha, petroleum, heavy arom”.
Registry Number 8655

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 21, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for eye and skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: should vomiting occur naturally, have casualty lean forward in order to reduce the risk of aspiration.
Registry Number 8656

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 16, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to be toxic by ingestion.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: should vomiting occur naturally, have casualty lean forward in order to reduce the risk of aspiration and that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped.
  3. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in class D1B.
Registry Number 8657

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 16, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for eye and skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: should vomiting occur naturally, have casualty lean forward in order to reduce the risk of aspiration.
Registry Number 8663

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 16, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose an AIHA WEEL–TWA Exposure Limit with a skin notation for the confidential hazardous ingredient “amine compound”, in an acceptable manner.

Registry Number 8671

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 23, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that acute ingestion of an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause central nervous system (CNS) effects in laboratory animals.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for eye contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 20 minutes or until the chemical is removed.
  3. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 2.44 g/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “inorganic phosphate”.
Registry Number 8684

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 7, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose an LD50 (oral, female rat) value of 12.25 mL/kg for the hazardous ingredient “methyl alcohol”.

Registry Number 8690

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 7, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Add hydrogen chloride to the list of hazardous combustion products.

Registry Number 8691

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 22, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for eye contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 20 minutes or until the chemical is removed.
  2. Disclose an LD50 (oral, female rat) value of 1 976 mg/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “sulfonated hydrocarbon”.
Registry Number 8735

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 20, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Add oxides of nitrogen to the list of hazardous combustion products.

Registry Number 8736

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 20, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that acute ingestion of an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause central nervous system (CNS) effects in humans.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  3. Add oxides of nitrogen to the list of hazardous combustion products.
  4. Disclose a statement to the effect that if ventilation is inadequate, vapours can spread from open containers of the product and may flash back, causing a fire if they contact an ignition source.
  5. Disclose an LD50 (oral, male rat) value of 4.7 g/kg, an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of 6.3 g/kg and an LC50 (vapour, female rat, 4 hours) value of 27 000 ppm for the hazardous ingredient “isopropyl alcohol”.
Registry Number 8744

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 14, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS.

Registry Number 8746

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 25, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the presence of two additional confidential hazardous ingredients in the controlled product together with their chemical identities and percent concentration, in an acceptable manner.
  2. Add oxides of sulphur to the list of hazardous decomposition products.
  3. Disclose an LD50 value for the confidential hazardous ingredient “glycol ether #1”, in an acceptable manner.
  4. Disclose oral and dermal LD50 values for the confidential hazardous ingredient “glycol ether”, in an acceptable manner.

Registry Number 8754

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 24, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in classes E and C.
  2. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product can be corrosive to the skin.
  3. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for eye contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 30 minutes, a statement to the effect that contaminated clothing, shoes and leather goods should be removed under running water, and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  5. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose advice such as the following: should vomiting occur naturally, have the casualty lean forward in order to reduce the risk of aspiration and obtain medical attention immediately.
Registry Number 8789

Date of notice confirming acceptance: January 13, 2014

The claimant had been advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose ingestion as a route of entry.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  3. Disclose an AIHA WEEL–TWA Exposure Limit with a skin notation for the confidential hazardous ingredient “sulphur compound”, in an acceptable manner.
Registry Number 8790

Date of notice confirming acceptance: November 13, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LD50 value of 3 000 mg/kg for the controlled product.
  2. Disclose the presence of an additional hazardous ingredient in the controlled product together with its chemical identities and percent concentration, in an acceptable manner.
  3. Disclose that hazardous ingredient “2-methylimidazole” has been classified as a Group 2B by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped.
  5. Disclose that if ventilation is inadequate, vapours can spread from open containers of the product and may flash back, causing a fire if they contact an ignition source.
  6. Disclose an LC50 (aerosol, rat, 4 hours) value of 0.27–0.51 mg/L for the hazardous ingredient “strontium chromate”.
  7. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in class D1A or D1B.
Registry Number 8791

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 6, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content and wording of the MSDS. The claimant had been further advised to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of >500 mg/kg for the confidential hazardous ingredient “inorganic salt 1”.
  2. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product has been shown to cause mutagenic effects in mammalian somatic cells, in vivo, and mutagenic effects in chromosome aberration assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells, in vitro.
  3. If the WHMIS classifications are stated on the MSDS, disclose that the controlled product is also in class D2B.
Registry Number 8793

Date of notice confirming acceptance: December 17, 2013

The claimant had been advised to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS.

In the case of the following claims, either the claimant did not supply the screening officer with a signed undertaking or the screening officer was not satisfied that the claimant had taken the measures set out in the undertaking in the manner and within the period specified in it. Pursuant to subsection 17(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the screening officer ordered the claimant to comply with the requirements of the relevant legislation within 30 days from the expiry of the appeal period, except that the information in respect of which the claim for exemption was made does not have to be disclosed, and to provide a copy of the amended MSDS to the screening officer within 30 days of expiry of the appeal period.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ORDERED THE CLAIMANT TO COMPLY WITH THE APPLICABLE DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer of the Workplace Hazardous Materials Directorate hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on a MSDS or label reviewed by the screening officer.

Registry Number 8510

Date of order: January 31, 2014

The claimant has been ordered to amend certain aspects of the wording of the MSDS. The claimant has been further ordered to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

1. Disclose the chemical identity of an additional hazardous ingredient, “buyraldehyde”, in the controlled product together with its percent concentration and CAS registry number, in an acceptable manner.

Registry Number 8582

Date of order: January 31, 2014

The claimant has been ordered to amend certain aspects of the content of the MSDS. The claimant has been further ordered to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose that an ingredient in the controlled product is a skin irritant.
  2. Disclose the chemical identity of an additional hazardous ingredient, “polyolefin amide alkyleneamine borate”, in the controlled product together with its percent concentration, in an acceptable manner.
  3. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that vomiting should not be induced.
  4. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for skin contact, disclose an approximate flush time of 20 minutes or until the chemical is removed.
  5. Add oxides of sulphur and oxides of nitrogen to the list of hazardous decomposition products.
  6. Disclose an LD50 (oral, rat) value of 2.23 g/kg for the hazardous ingredient “zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate”.
Registry Number 8648

Date of order: January 24, 2014

The claimant has been ordered to amend certain aspects of the format of the MSDS. The claimant has been further ordered to amend the MSDS as indicated below.

  1. Disclose an LD50 (dermal, rabbit) value of 8.0 mL/kg for the ingredient “alcohol”.
  2. In relation to the first aid information shown on the MSDS for ingestion, disclose a statement to the effect that trained personnel should immediately administer artificial respiration or cardiopulmonary resuscitation if breathing has stopped or the heart has stopped and that medical attention must be obtained immediately.
  3. Disclose that two ingredients in the controlled product have been shown to cause teratogenic or embryotoxic effects in laboratory animals.

[13-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

CANADA CORPORATIONS ACT

Supplementary letters patent

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act, supplementary letters patent have been issued to

File No.

Name of Company

Date of S.L.P.

426604-8

HOPE HOUSE YOUTH CHARITIES

12/02/2014

395919-8

TULA FOUNDATION

24/01/2014

March 21, 2014

CHERYL RINGOR
Acting Director
For the Minister of Industry

[13-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Schedules I, II and III

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsections 14(3) and 14.1(3) of the Bank Act, that Schedules I, II and III, as amended, were as shown below as at December 31, 2013.

SCHEDULE I
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2013

Name of Bank

Head Office

B2B Bank

Ontario

Bank of Montreal

Quebec

Bank of Nova Scotia (The)

Nova Scotia

Bank West

Alberta

Bridgewater Bank

Alberta

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

Ontario

Canadian Tire Bank

Ontario

Canadian Western Bank

Alberta

Citizens Bank of Canada

British Columbia

Continental Bank of Canada

Ontario

CS Alterna Bank

Ontario

DirectCash Bank

Alberta

Equitable Bank

Ontario

First Nations Bank of Canada

Saskatchewan

General Bank of Canada

Alberta

Hollis Canadian Bank

Ontario

HomEquity Bank

Ontario

ING Bank of Canada

Ontario

Jameson Bank

Ontario

Laurentian Bank of Canada

Quebec

Manulife Bank of Canada

Ontario

MonCana Bank of Canada

Alberta

National Bank of Canada

Quebec

Pacific & Western Bank of Canada

Ontario

President’s Choice Bank

Ontario

RedBrick Bank

Ontario

Rogers Bank

Ontario

Royal Bank of Canada

Quebec

Toronto-Dominion Bank (The)

Ontario

SCHEDULE II
(Section 14)

As at December 31, 2013

Name of Bank

Head Office

Amex Bank of Canada

Ontario

Bank of America Canada

Ontario

Bank of China (Canada)

Ontario

Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ (Canada)

Ontario

Bank One Canada

Ontario

BNP Paribas (Canada)

Quebec

BofA Canada Bank

Ontario

Citco Bank Canada

Ontario

Citibank Canada

Ontario

CTBC Bank Corp. (Canada)

British Columbia

Habib Canadian Bank

Ontario

HSBC Bank Canada

British Columbia

ICICI Bank Canada

Ontario

Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Canada)

Ontario

J.P. Morgan Bank Canada

Ontario

J.P. Morgan Canada

Ontario

Korea Exchange Bank of Canada

Ontario

Mega International Commercial Bank (Canada)

Ontario

Shinhan Bank Canada

Ontario

Société Générale (Canada)

Quebec

State Bank of India (Canada)

Ontario

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation of Canada

Ontario

UBS Bank (Canada)

Ontario

Walmart Canada Bank

Ontario

SCHEDULE III
(Section 14.1)

As at December 31, 2013

Name of Authorized Foreign Bank (FB)

Name under which FB is permitted to carry on business in Canada

Type of Foreign Bank Branch (FBB) (see reference *)

Principal Office

Bank of America, National Association

Bank of America, National Association

Full-service

Ontario

Bank of New York Mellon (The)

Bank of New York Mellon (The)

Full-service

Ontario

Barclays Bank PLC

Barclays Bank PLC, Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

BNP Paribas

BNP Paribas

Full-service

Quebec

Capital One Bank (USA), N.A.

Capital One Bank (Canada Branch)

Full-service

Ontario

Citibank, N.A.

Citibank, N.A.

Full-service

Ontario

Comerica Bank

Comerica Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Coöperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A.

Rabobank Nederland

Full-service

Ontario

Credit Suisse AG

Credit Suisse AG, Toronto Branch

Lending

Ontario

Deutsche Bank AG

Deutsche Bank AG

Full-service

Ontario

Fifth Third Bank

Fifth Third Bank

Full-service

Ontario

First Commercial Bank

First Commercial Bank

Full-service

British Columbia

HSBC Bank USA, National Association

HSBC Bank USA, National Association

Full-service

Ontario

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association

Full-service

Ontario

M&T Bank

M&T Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Maple Bank GmbH

Maple Bank

Full-service

Ontario

Merrill Lynch International Bank Limited

Merrill Lynch International Bank Limited

Lending

Ontario

Mizuho Bank, Ltd.

Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Northern Trust Company (The)

Northern Trust Company, Canada Branch (The)

Full-service

Ontario

PNC Bank, National Association

PNC Bank Canada Branch

Lending

Ontario

Royal Bank of Scotland N.V. (The)

Royal Bank of Scotland N.V., (Canada) Branch (The)

Full-service

Ontario

Royal Bank of Scotland plc (The)

Royal Bank of Scotland plc, Canada Branch (The)

Full-service

Ontario

Société Générale

Société Générale (Canada Branch)

Full-service

Quebec

State Street Bank and Trust Company

State Street

Full-service

Ontario

U.S. Bank National Association

U.S. Bank National Association

Full-service

Ontario

UBS AG

UBS AG Canada Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Union Bank, National Association

Union Bank, Canada Branch

Lending

Alberta

United Overseas Bank Limited

United Overseas Bank Limited

Full-service

British Columbia

Wells Fargo Bank, National Association

Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch

Full-service

Ontario

Reference *
An FBB, whose order is subject to the restrictions and requirements referred to in subsection 524(2) of the Bank Act, is referred to as a “lending” branch.

March 18, 2014

JULIE DICKSON
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

[13-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at February 28, 2014

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

5.9

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

52.9

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

4.9

 
   

57.8

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

20,414.0

 

Government of Canada bonds

68,296.9

 

Other investments

353.2

 
   

89,064.1

Property and equipment

 

232.9

Intangible assets

 

50.3

Other assets

 

243.4

   

89,654.4


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

63,720.9

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,381.9

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

259.5

 

Other deposits

1,223.4

 
   

24,864.8

Liabilities in foreign currencies

Government of Canada

 

Other

 
   

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

616.1

 
     

616.1

     

89,201.8

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

322.6

 

Actuarial gains reserve

 

Retained earnings

 
     

452.6

89,654.4

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, March 17, 2014

Rudy Wytenburg
Deputy Chief — Financial Services

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, March 17, 2014

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

[13-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number is the property of the American Chemical Society and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.