Vol. 148, No. 15 — April 12, 2014

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three aviation fuel substancesDistillates (petroleum), sweetened middle, CAS RN (see footnote 1) 64741-86-2, Naphtha (petroleum), sweetened, CAS RN 64741-87-3, and Naphtha (petroleum), full-range alkylate butane-containing, CAS RN 68527-27-5 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Distillates (petroleum), sweetened middle, Naphtha (petroleum), sweetened and Naphtha (petroleum), full-range alkylate butane-containing are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on these aviation fuel substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that these aviation fuel substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment
RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on Aviation Fuels

The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following substances, identified as aviation fuels:

Aviation turbine fuel

CAS RNa

DSLb name

64741-86-2

Distillates (petroleum), sweetened middle

a The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
b DSL: Domestic Substances List

Aviation gasoline fuels

CAS RNa

DSLb name

64741-87-3

Naphtha (petroleum), sweetened

68527-27-5

Naphtha (petroleum), full-range alkylate butane-containing

a The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
b DSL: Domestic Substances List

These aviation fuels were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of the DSL, as they were determined to present “greatest potential” or intermediate potential for exposure of individuals in Canada, and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. These substances met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

Aviation fuels fall under two major categories: aviation turbine fuels (jet fuels) intended for use in aviation gas turbines (compression-ignited turbine jet engines), and aviation gasoline fuels (AVGAS) intended for use in spark-ignited aviation piston engines. The majority (99%) of refinery production is aviation turbine fuel. Aviation gasoline fuel is used in a much smaller quantity, representing approximately 1% of the total aviation fuels in Canada.

An analysis of Canadian aviation fuel spills data for the years 2000–2009 indicated that there is on average less than one spill per year for aviation turbine fuel to water during ship loading, transport and unloading that is of a sufficient size to be expected to be harmful to aquatic organisms (fish, invertebrates, algae, phytoplankton). Aviation gasoline is not transported by ship, and therefore spills to water during transport are not expected. Spills of aviation gasoline fuels and aviation turbine fuel to soil may cause adverse effects to terrestrial organisms (invertebrates, plants), with approximately four to eight spills to the environment occurring per year of which the average spill volume is expected to cause harm. However, the actual number of spills is expected to be closer to the lower end of the range, and not all of the releases will be of a volume to cause significant harm. No systemic cause for the releases was identified. This analysis excluded spills taking place on the properties of commercial airports or industrial sites (e.g. refineries, bulk storage terminals), as releases at these locations are expected to undergo immediate remediation that would minimize entry into the environment.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is therefore concluded that the aviation turbine fuel (CAS RN 64741-86-2) and the aviation gasoline fuels (CAS RNs 64741-87-3 and 68527-27-5) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of aviation fuels was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Additionally, benzene, a component of aviation fuels, has been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as a carcinogen, and was added to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of CEPA 1999. As the predominant route of exposure to aviation fuels was determined to be inhalation, estimates of cancer potency for inhalation of benzene were used to characterize risk to the general population from evaporative emissions of aviation fuels.

Aviation fuels exhibited mixed results in in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Results from limited studies in laboratory animals indicated the potential for developmental health effects at high concentrations in mice but not in rats.

The potential for exposure of the general population to evaporative emissions of aviation fuel at Canadian airports and in the vicinity of bulk storage facilities was evaluated. For non-cancer effects, margins of exposure between upper-bounding estimates of exposure and critical effect levels identified in laboratory animals are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. For cancer, margins of exposure between upper-bounding estimates of exposure and estimates of cancer potency are considered adequate to address uncertainties related to health effects and exposure. Accordingly, it is concluded that the aviation turbine fuel (CAS RN 64741-86-2) and the aviation gasoline fuels (CAS RNs 64741-87-3 and 68527-27-5) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is therefore concluded that the aviation turbine fuel (CAS RN 64741-86-2) and the aviation gasoline fuels (CAS RNs 64741-87-3 and 68527-27-5) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The Screening Assessment Report on these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three fuel oil substances specified on the Domestic Substances List — Fuel Oil No. 4, CAS RN (see footnote 2) 68476-31-3, Fuel Oil No. 6, CAS RN 68553-00-4 (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999), and Residual Fuel Oil, CAS RN 68476-33-5 (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act)

Whereas Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6 are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the Screening Assessment conducted on the three fuel oil substances, pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act for Residual Fuel Oil and section 74 of the Act for Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the three fuel oil substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on Residual Fuel Oil at this time, and

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6 at this time under section 77 of the Act.

LEONA AGLUKKAQ
Minister of the Environment
RONA AMBROSE
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Screening Assessment Report on Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 and Residual Fuel Oil

The Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following heavy fuel oils:

CAS RNa

DSLb name

68476-31-3

Fuel Oil, No. 4

68553-00-4

Fuel Oil, No. 6

68476-33-5

Fuel Oil, Residual

a The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior written permission of the American Chemical Society.
b DSL: Domestic Substances List

Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6 were identified as high priorities for action during the categorization of the Domestic Substances List (DSL), as they were determined to present “greatest potential” or intermediate potential for exposure of individuals in Canada, and were considered to present a high hazard to human health. Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6 also met the ecological categorization criteria for persistence or bioaccumulation potential and inherent toxicity to aquatic organisms. Residual Fuel Oil was considered to present a high hazard to human health but low potential for exposure, and was included in this assessment because its composition and properties are similar to those of Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

These substances are transported in large volumes from refinery and upgrader facilities to other industrial end users such as pulp mills and large-scale power generation utilities via pipeline, ship, train and truck; therefore, exposure to the environment is expected.

An analysis of Canadian fuel oil spills data for the years 2000–2009 indicated that, on average, fewer than one spill per year is of sufficient size to be expected to be harmful to aquatic organisms (fish, invertebrates, algae) in marine waters around loading/unloading wharves.

While releases of Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 or Residual Fuel Oil have the potential to have detrimental effects on aquatic birds, risk to birds is considered to be low due to the very low frequency of spills during transport.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 and Residual Fuel Oil (CAS RNs 68476-31-3, 68553-00-4 and 68476-33-5) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), as they are not entering the environment in quantities or concentrations or under conditions that have or may have immediate or long-term harmful effects on the environment or its biological diversity, or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of these substances was carcinogenicity, based primarily on classifications by international agencies. Skin painting studies in laboratory animals reported skin tumour development after chronic dermal exposure to Fuel Oil No. 4, Residual Fuel Oil and related heavy fuel oil (HFO) substances. Limited in vitro genotoxicity studies were negative for Fuel Oil No. 4 and Fuel Oil No. 6, although other HFOs demonstrated genotoxicity. Dermal studies of related HFO substances in laboratory animals reported reproductive and developmental effects.

The potential for exposure of the general population to Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 and Residual Fuel Oil was assessed. There is limited residential use and restricted access to these fuels; therefore, exposure of the general population is not expected. Thus, the risk to human health is considered to be low. Accordingly, it is concluded that Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 and Residual Fuel Oil (CAS RNs 68476-31-3, 68553-00-4 and 68476-33-5) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA 1999, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is therefore concluded that Fuel Oil No. 4, Fuel Oil No. 6 and Residual Fuel Oil (CAS RNs 68476-31-3, 68553-00-4 and 68476-33-5 respectively) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA 1999.

The Screening Assessment Report on these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Government of British Columbia

 

Administrators

 

Bracken, The Hon. J. Keith

2014-318

March 31 to April 4, 2014

 

Cullen, The Hon. Austin F.

2014-319

April 8 to April 11, 2014

 

Government of Ontario

2014-350

Administrators

 

Feldman, The Hon. Kathryn N.

 

May 5 to May 11, 2014

 

Lauwers, The Hon. Peter D.

 

April 14 to April 27 and May 19 to May 25, 2014

 

Rosenberg, The Hon. Marc

 

April 1 to April 4, 2014

 

Smith, The Hon. Heather J.

 

April 5 to April 13, May 1 to May 4, May 12 to May 18 and effective May 26, 2014

 

Tulloch, The Hon. Michael H.

 

April 28 to April 30, 2014

 

Government of Saskatchewan

 

Administrators

 

Caldwell, The Hon. Neal W.

2014-320

April 8 to April 13, 2014

 

Cameron, The Hon. Stuart J.

2014-292

March 21 to March 23, 2014

 

Herauf, The Hon./ Maurice J.

2014-320

April 1 to April 6, 2014

 

Oland, The Hon. Linda Lee

2014-321

Government of Nova Scotia

 

Administrator

 

April 2 to April 9, 2014

 

April 3, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated March 19, 2014

Holder, M. Ed, P.C.

Minister of State to assist the Minister of Industry to be styled Minister of State (Science and Technology)

Oliver, The Hon./L’hon. Joe, P.C.

Minister of Finance

Rickford, The Hon. Greg, P.C.

Minister of Natural Resources and Minister of State to assist the Minister of Industry to be styled Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

April 3, 2014

DIANE BÉLANGER
Official Documents Registrar

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD

Chairperson and Member (full-time position)

The National Energy Board (NEB) is an independent federal tribunal located in Calgary, Alberta. Its mandate is to promote safety and security, environmental protection, efficient energy infrastructure and markets, and to make decisions in the Canadian public interest within the mandate set by Parliament for the regulation of pipelines, energy development and trade. The work of the NEB sustains and preserves the confidence of the Canadian public in the country’s energy infrastructure. The NEB has a staff of approximately 450 employees and an annual budget of $70 million. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources.

As chief executive officer, the Chairperson’s primary responsibility is to provide strategic and operational leadership to the Board, and to participate in Board decision-making processes as one of nine permanent members of a quasi-judicial tribunal in the promotion of safety, environmental protection and economic efficiency in the public interest, in the area of energy regulation.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in economics, engineering, environmental science, finance or law would be considered an asset. Significant management experience at the senior executive level in a private or public sector organization, including managing human and financial resources, preferably in the energy sector, is desired. The candidate should possess experience working in or with a regulatory agency, or in the conduct and/or management of an adjudicative tribunal, ideally one with diverse technical responsibilities. He or she would have experience in decision-making with respect to sensitive and complex issues, dealing with energy-related issues, and leading a multidisciplinary team. Experience in dealing with economic, social, safety, environmental and Aboriginal issues would be considered an asset.

The candidate should possess knowledge of the mandate and activities of the NEB, as well as its legislative framework, including the National Energy Board Act, and the regulatory and business environments within which the NEB operates. Knowledge of the functioning of energy markets and the energy sector (economic, social or environmental components) and of the role of government and the regulatory agencies in facilitating market outcomes that are in keeping with the Canadian public interest is sought. The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the regulation of energy extraction, transportation and trade, including interprovincial and international pipelines and transmission lines, for safety, security, and environmental responsibility. The ideal candidate will also have knowledge of Canada’s energy supply and demand trends, the structure and operation of Canada’s energy industry and its presence — current and potential — in the global market. Possessing knowledge of the responsibilities of a public sector administrative tribunal, the candidate should also be knowledgeable about the principles of sound governance and business practices, including human resources and financial management.

Exhibiting high ethical standards, integrity and impartiality, the ideal candidate would have the ability to manage a public institution with diverse technical and regulatory responsibilities, and provide the intellectual leadership, vision and strategic direction needed to ensure the NEB is able to carry out its mandate and achieve its objectives in accordance with the National Energy Board Act. With sound judgment, the candidate would also be able to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies, and review and analyze complex technical information in order to make equitable decisions and recommendations within a strict time frame, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences. With tact and diplomacy, the candidate should be able to lead a board, seek the input of members, draw lines of consensus, identify and resolve points of debate, build consensus, and ensure buy-in for final decisions. Possessing superior interpersonal skills, collegiality and the ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships, the ideal candidate would be able to work effectively with senior industry, government and non-government officials. With the ability to negotiate skilfully, to seek results and to build consensus, the ideal candidate would be able to reach positive outcomes among disparate groups with strong, and sometimes diverging, interests on highly technical issues. He or she would possess superior communication skills and have the ability to advance comprehensive strategic and proactive communications strategies, including public outreach, media and networking activities.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate will be willing to relocate to Calgary, Alberta, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The successful candidate must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident within the meaning of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Additionally, he or she must not, as owner, shareholder, director, officer, partner or otherwise, be engaged in any such business of producing, selling, buying, transmitting, exporting, importing or otherwise dealing in hydrocarbons or electricity nor hold any bond, debenture or other security of a corporation engaged in any such business. Finally, the candidate must devote the whole of his or her time to the performance of his or her duties and shall not accept or hold any office or employment inconsistent with his or her duties and functions.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rcmmn/hm-eng.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please call Tim Hamilton, Janet Soles or Brian Mellor at 403-410-6700. To be considered for this position, please forward your curriculum vitae and covering letter to calgaryopportunities@boyden.com.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

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NOTICE OF VACANCY

NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD

Vice-Chairperson and Member (full-time position)

The National Energy Board (NEB) is an independent federal tribunal located in Calgary, Alberta. Its mandate is to promote safety and security, environmental protection, efficient energy infrastructure and markets, and to make decisions in the Canadian public interest within the mandate set by Parliament for the regulation of pipelines, energy development and trade. The work of the NEB sustains and preserves the confidence of the Canadian public in the country’s energy infrastructure. The NEB has a staff of approximately 450 employees and an annual budget of $70 million. It reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources.

The Vice-Chairperson’s primary responsibility is to act for the Chairperson when required, and to participate in Board decision-making processes as one of nine permanent members of a quasi-judicial tribunal, to promote safety, environmental protection and economic efficiency in the Canadian public interest, in the area of energy regulation.

The ideal candidate would possess a degree from a recognized university or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. A degree in economics, engineering, environmental science, finance or law would be considered an asset. Management experience at the senior executive level in a private or public sector organization, including managing human and financial resources, preferably in the energy sector, is desired. The candidate should possess experience working in or with a regulatory agency, or in the conduct and/or management of an adjudicative tribunal, ideally one with diverse technical responsibilities. He or she would have experience in decision-making with respect to sensitive and complex issues and in dealing with energy-related or regulatory issues. Experience in dealing with economic, social, safety, environmental and Aboriginal issues would be considered an asset.

The candidate should possess knowledge of the mandate and activities of the NEB, as well as its legislative framework, including the National Energy Board Act, and the regulatory and business environments within which the NEB operates. Knowledge of the functioning of energy markets and the energy sector (economic, social or environmental components) and of the role of government and the regulatory agencies in facilitating market outcomes that are in keeping with the Canadian public interest is sought. The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of the regulation of energy extraction, transportation and trade, including interprovincial and international pipelines and transmission lines, for safety, security, and environmental responsibility. The ideal candidate will also have knowledge of Canada’s energy supply and demand trends, the structure and operation of Canada’s energy industry and its presence — current and potential — in the global market. Possessing knowledge of the responsibilities of a public sector administrative tribunal, the candidate should also be knowledgeable about the principles of sound governance and business practices, including human resources and financial management.

Exhibiting high ethical standards, integrity and impartiality, the ideal candidate would have the ability to provide leadership within the Board and to provide quality advice, support and recommendations to the Chairperson in carrying out his or her mandate in accordance with the National Energy Board Act. With sound judgment, the candidate would also be able to interpret relevant statutes, regulations and policies, and review and analyze complex technical information in order to make equitable decisions and recommendations within a strict time frame, while anticipating their short- and long-term consequences. With tact and diplomacy, the candidate should be able to seek the input of members, draw lines of consensus, identify and resolve points of debate, build consensus, and ensure buy-in for final decisions. Possessing superior interpersonal skills and collegiality, the ideal candidate would be able to work effectively with senior industry, government and non-government officials. With superior communication skills, the ideal candidate would have the ability to manage human and financial resources, to motivate members and staff, and to ensure the NEB adheres to the highest standards of accountability.

Proficiency in both official languages would be preferred.

The successful candidate will be willing to relocate to Calgary, Alberta, or to a location within reasonable commuting distance.

The successful candidate must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident within the meaning of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Additionally, he or she must not, as owner, shareholder, director, officer, partner or otherwise, be engaged in any such business of producing, selling, buying, transmitting, exporting, importing or otherwise dealing in hydrocarbons or electricity nor hold any bond, debenture or other security of a corporation engaged in any such business. Finally, the candidate must devote the whole of his or her time to the performance of his or her duties and shall not accept or hold any office or employment inconsistent with his or her duties and functions.

The Government is committed to ensuring that its appointments are representative of Canada’s regions and official languages, as well as of women, Aboriginal peoples, disabled persons and visible minorities.

The selected candidate must comply with the Ethical and Political Activity Guidelines for Public Office Holders. The Guidelines are available on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site, under “Reference Material,” at www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/index.asp?lang=eng.

The selected candidate will be subject to the Conflict of Interest Act. Public office holders appointed on a full-time basis must submit to the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner, within 60 days of appointment, a confidential report in which they disclose all of their assets, liabilities and outside activities. For more information, please visit the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner’s Web site at http://ciec-ccie.gc.ca/Default.aspx?pid=1&lang=en.

This notice has been placed in the Canada Gazette to assist the Governor in Council in identifying qualified candidates for this position. It is not, however, intended to be the sole means of recruitment.

Further details about the organization and its activities can be found on its Web site at www.neb-one.gc.ca/clf-nsi/rcmmn/hm-eng.html.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please call Tim Hamilton, Janet Soles or Brian Mellor at 403-410-6700. To be considered for this position, please forward your curriculum vitae and covering letter to calgaryopportunities@boyden.com.

English and French notices of vacancies will be produced in an alternative format upon request. For further information, please contact GICA-NGEC@pco-bcp.gc.ca.

[15-1-o]