Vol. 149, No. 22 — May 30, 2015

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for substances (subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a substance that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use, manufacture or import for a significant new activity a substance that is on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use for a significant new activity a substance that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsection 81(1), (3) or (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived; and

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waived the requirement to provide information in accordance with the following annex pursuant to subsection 81(8) of that Act.

KAREN L. DODDS
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of Information Requirements
(Subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver is granted Information concerning a substance in relation to which a waiver is granted (see reference *)
3M Canada Company Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test
Data in respect of dissociation constants (3)
Data in respect of hydrolysis as a function of pH
Data in respect of adsorption/desorption screening test
Ashland Canada Corp. Data in respect of water solubility
Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
BASF Canada Inc. Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
Data in respect of fat solubility (2)
Data in respect of adsorption/desorption screening test
Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test (2)
Data in respect of vapour pressure
Data in respect of dissociation constants
Data in respect of hydrolysis as a function of pH
Data from ready biodegradation test
Bayer Inc. Data in respect of water solubility
Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
Data in respect of dissociation constants
Cambrian solutions Inc. Data in respect of density
Data in respect of vapour pressure
CCR Data in respect of dissociation constants (2)
Chevron Chemical Co. LLC Data in respect of dissociation constants
  Data in respect of adsorption/desorption screening test
Chevron Oronite Company LLC Data in respect of adsorption/desorption screening test
Clariant (Canada) Inc. Data in respect of hydrolysis as a function of pH (2)
Dorf Ketal Chemicals LLC Data in respect of vapour pressure
Data in respect of density
Henkel Corporation Data in respect of water extractability
Data in respect of hydrolysis as a function of pH
Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
Data from acute aquatic toxicity test
Data from acute mammalian oral toxicity test
NOVA Chemicals Corporation Data in respect of melting point
Data in respect of boiling point
Data in respect of density
Data in respect of vapour pressure
Data in respect of water solubility
Data in respect of octanol/water partition coefficient
Data from ready biodegradation test
Shire Canada Inc. Data in respect of vapour pressure
Takeda Canada Inc. Data in respect of vapour pressure

Reference *
The number in brackets indicates the number of times that the information requirement in the second column was waived for the company.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The decision to grant a waiver is made on a case-by-case basis by Environment Canada in consultation with Health Canada. On average, approximately 100 waivers are granted yearly for chemicals and polymers and organisms for an average of 500 notifications received.

For more information, please see the waivers Web page on the New Substances Web site at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvellesnewsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=7F19FF4B-1.

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DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT

Consultations on potential free trade agreement negotiations with the Philippines

The Government of Canada is seeking the views of Canadians on the scope of a potential free trade agreement between Canada and the Philippines.

This notice is part of the Government of Canada’s domestic consultation process with business, citizen-based organizations and individual Canadians, as well as with provincial and territorial governments, to obtain advice and views on priorities, objectives and concerns to help outline the parameters of this initiative.

Background

On May 8, 2015, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Benigno Aquino III of the Philippines announced the launch of exploratory discussions toward a potential Canada–Philippines free trade agreement.

The Philippines, which is an important partner for Canada in southeast Asia and a priority market under the Government of Canada’s Global Markets Action Plan, is part of one of the most vibrant and quickly developing regions of the world with enormous potential for growth. With a market of approximately 100 million consumers and a GDP of $315 billion in 2014, the Philippines has one of the fastest GDP growth rates in Asia.

In 2014, Canada’s bilateral merchandise trade with the Philippines reached more than $1.8 billion, an increase of 3.9% over the previous year. Canadian merchandise exports to the Philippines were valued at nearly $570 million in 2014 and consisted primarily of mineral ores (mainly copper ores and concentrates), wood, meat (mainly pork), and fertilizers. Canada imported more than $1.2 billion in merchandise from the Philippines in 2014, which consisted primarily of electrical machinery and equipment (mainly insulated wires and electronic circuits), machinery, rubber (mainly tires), and scientific and precision instruments.

Canada and the Philippines also conduct trade in services. In 2013, Canada’s services exports to the Philippines were valued at $246 million, while Canada imported $335 million in services from the Philippines.

The Philippine economy provides opportunities for Canadian companies in the areas of agri-food, defense and security, information and communications technologies, infrastructure, and education.

Canada and the Philippines have a number of bilateral agreements in place that are designed to enhance the economic relationship between the countries, including a Double Taxation Agreement (1976), a Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (1996), and an Air Transport Agreement (2008, amended in 2014).

Additional information on Canada’s relationship with the Philippines can be found on the Web sites of the following organizations:

Submissions by interested parties

The Government is embarking on a public consultation process to allow all interested stakeholders an early opportunity to provide comments and advice on a possible free trade agreement with the Philippines. It is essential that the Government of Canada be fully aware of the interests and potential sensitivities of Canadians with respect to this initiative. We welcome advice and views on any priorities, objectives and concerns relating to a possible free trade agreement with the Philippines. In particular, we are seeking views with respect to the following:

All interested parties are invited to submit their views by July 30, 2015. Comments will continue to be welcome past that date and throughout the exploratory process. Please be advised that any information received as a result of this consultation will be considered public information, unless explicitly stated otherwise. Submissions should include

  1. the contributor’s name and address and, if applicable, his or her organization, institution or business;
  2. the specific issues being addressed; and
  3. precise information on the rationale for the position taken, including any significant impact it may have on Canada’s domestic or foreign interests.

Contributions can be sent by email, fax or mail to PhilippinesConsultations-Philippines@international.gc.ca (email), 613-944-5119 (fax), or Trade Negotiations Consultations (Philippines), Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, Trade Policy and Negotiations Division — Asia (TPA), Lester B. Pearson Building, 125 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2.

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TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Occupational group definitions

Pursuant to paragraph 11.1(1)(b) of the Financial Administration Act, the Treasury Board of Canada hereby provides notice that the Foreign Service Group definition effective March 18, 1999, as published in Part I of the Canada Gazette on March 27, 1999, is amended and replaced by the following definition effective June 1, 2015.

Foreign Service Group Definition

The Foreign Service Group comprises positions that are primarily involved in the planning, development, delivery and promotion of Canada’s diplomatic, commercial, human rights, cultural, promotional, consular and international development policies and interests in other countries and in international organizations through the career rotational foreign service.

Inclusions

Notwithstanding the generality of the foregoing, for greater certainty, it includes positions that have, as their primary purpose, responsibility for one or more of the following activities:

  1. commercial and economic relations and trade policy — the planning, development, delivery or management of policies, programs, services or other activities directed at Canada’s economic or trade relations with foreign countries, including the development, promotion or strengthening of Canada’s economic or trade interests in bilateral or multilateral forums;
  2. political and economic relations — the planning, development, delivery or management of policies, programs, services or other activities directed at Canada’s political relationships with foreign countries;
  3. immigration affairs — the delivery or management of immigration policies, programs, services or other activities in support of the Canadian immigration program abroad;
  4. legal affairs — the provision of legal advice to the federal government on Canada’s international rights and obligations; the interpretation and application of international legal obligations; the negotiation of various bilateral and multilateral agreements, treaties and conventions; and the defence of Canada’s position respecting those obligations and agreements including dispute settlement;
  5. communications and culture — the planning, development, delivery or management of communications and cultural policies, programs and services abroad to promote Canada’s foreign service role to Canadians and to promote Canada in the world;
  6. consular affairs and emergency management — the planning, development, delivery or management of consular affairs or emergency management services and programs abroad in support of Canadians and missions; and
  7. the provision of related advice.
Exclusions

Positions excluded from the Foreign Service Group are those whose primary purpose is included in the definition of any other group or those in which one or more of the following activities is/are of primary importance:

  1. the provision of administrative or information services as described in the Program and Administrative Services Group; and
  2. the representation in other countries of Canadian interests in a specialized field when the incumbent is not a career rotational foreign service officer.

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at April 30, 2015

Unaudited
(Millions of dollars)

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

5.7

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

 

Advances to members of the Canadian Payments Association

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

3.1

 
   

3.1

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

19,482.1

 

Government of Canada bonds

74,834.7

 

Other investments

368.1

 
   

94,684.9

Property and equipment

 

320.3

Intangible assets

 

41.1

Other assets

 

189.0

 

95,244.1


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

68,983.2

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,509.4

 

Members of the Canadian Payments Association

150.3

 

Other deposits

1,541.3

 
   

25,201.0

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

595.6

 
   

595.6

   

94,779.8

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

334.3

 
   

464.3

95,244.1

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, May 15, 2015

CARMEN VIERULA
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, May 15, 2015

STEPHEN S. POLOZ
Governor

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