Vol. 150, No. 30 — July 23, 2016

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of Boric acid, its salts and its precursors, including those specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and 68(c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on boric acid, its salts and its precursors, pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act, is annexed hereby;

Whereas the 14 substances identified in the table in the annex and addressed in the draft screening assessment of boric acid, its salts and its precursors are substances on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that boric acid, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act;

And whereas “boron compounds excluding borosilicates, borosilicate glass and borides” includes all substances that include or that may release boric acid,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that boron compounds excluding borosilicates, borosilicate glass and borides be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

And notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for boric acid, its salts and its precursors to initiate discussions with stakeholders on the development of risk management actions.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), ec.substances.ec@canada.ca (email).

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

DAVID MORIN
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

VIRGINIA POTER
Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and
Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

JOHN COOPER
Acting Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the Draft Screening Assessment of Boric Acid, its Salts and its Precursors

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of boric acid, its salts and its precursors. Substances in this assessment were identified as priorities for action, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were included for assessment efficiency.

This screening assessment focuses on boric acid, and therefore includes boric acid, its salts and its precursors, i.e. boron-containing substances that release boric acid through all transformation pathways (e.g. hydrolytic, oxidative, digestive or metabolic) at environmentally or physiologically relevant conditions (i.e. pH and concentration). Boric acid, its salts and its precursors of commercial significance in Canada were considered in terms of their contribution to the combined exposure to boric acid but were not individually assessed. This assessment considers total exposure of humans and other living organisms to boric acid, whether it is present in environmental media (e.g. water, sediment, soil or air), food or products.

Boric acid and boric acid precursors identified through categorization under subsection 73(1) of CEPA

CAS RN DSL name
1303-96-4 Borax (B4Na2O7.10H2O)
1330-43-4 Boron sodium oxide (B4Na2O7)
1332-07-6 Boric acid, zinc salt
7632-04-4 Perboric acid (HBO(O2)), sodium salt
10043-35-3 Boric acid (H3BO3)
12007-60-2 Boron lithium oxide (B4Li2O7)
12007-89-5 Ammonium boron oxide ((NH4)B5O8)
12271-95-3 Boron silver oxide (B4Ag2O7)
12767-90-7 Boron zinc oxide (B6Zn2O11)
13453-69-5 Boric acid (HBO2), lithium salt
13814-96-5 Borate(1-), tetrafluoro-, lead(2+) (2:1)
13826-83-0 Borate(1-), tetrafluoro-, ammonium
14486-19-2 Borate(1-), tetrafluoro-, cadmium (2:1)
68457-13-6 Cobalt, borate neodecanoate complexes

Abbreviations: CAS RN, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number; DSL, Domestic Substances List

Boric acid has natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources of boric acid include sea-salt aerosols, soil dusts, volcanoes, biomass burning (e.g. forest fires), plant aerosols, and rock and soil weathering. Anthropogenic sources are also significant and include the manufacture, import and use of boric acid, its salts and its precursors in products and manufactured items. According to information reported under section 71 of CEPA for nine substances that were manufactured or imported above reporting thresholds in Canada in 2008 and information gathered by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) [2009–2012], large quantities of boric acid, its salts and its precursors are imported annually into Canada (42 000–61 000 metric tons). The substances are used for a wide variety of products and applications, including fibreglass insulation, oil and gas extraction, fertilizers, cellulose insulation, gypsum boards, engineered wood products, pulp and paper manufacturing, rubber manufacturing, chemical manufacturing, metallurgical applications, cleaning products, cosmetics, drugs and natural health products (NHPs), swimming pool and spa chemicals, and surface finishing. Other anthropogenic sources include the incidental production and subsequent release of boric acid as a result of activities such as coal-fired power generation, metal mining (including base metals, precious metals and uranium), base metals and precious metals smelting and refining, coal mining, oil sands extraction and processing, oil and gas extraction, wastewater treatment (including the land application of biosolids), and waste disposal (landfill leachate).

Following releases to the environment, boric acid may enter water, air and soil media. Because of its high water solubility (49 grams per litre [g/L]), boric acid released to the aquatic environment is expected to remain in this compartment and to be highly bioavailable to aquatic organisms. Boric acid released to air is removed from the atmosphere and deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments by wet (rain and snow) and dry deposition. In soil, boric acid is considered highly mobile, because it does not undergo redox reactions and its bioavailability is mainly influenced by adsorption reactions that may occur slowly. Generally, boric acid is not considered bioaccumulative in most aquatic organisms and especially not in invertebrates and fish, although bioaccumulation has been observed in some aquatic plants and algae. Evidence suggests that boric acid does not biomagnify in the environment.

Boron, absorbed as boric acid is a micronutrient for plants and other organisms such as fish and frogs. Boric acid may be taken up by aquatic organisms, and has been demonstrated to cause harm at moderately low concentrations, as indicated by a long-term chronic predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) value of 1.5 milligrams of boron per litre (mg B/L). Considering the high bioavailability of anthropogenic boric acid added in soil compared to natural sources of boron, the added-risk approach focusing on anthropogenic added fraction only was used to characterize the effects of boric acid on soil organisms. Although certain soil-dwelling organisms are sensitive to boric acid, it is generally anticipated to cause harm at moderately low concentrations as a result of chronic exposure (i.e. PNECadded value of 6.08 milligrams of boron per kilogram [mg B/kg]).

Ecological exposure scenarios were developed for the various activities that represent significant sources of release of boric acid, its salts and its precursors to the environment. Exposure to boric acid was assessed based on modelled and measured concentrations of total or dissolved boron in environmental media, subsequently used to derive predicted environmental concentrations (PECs). Substance-specific exposure scenarios were developed to represent releases of boric acid from uses associated with the following sectors and activities: pulp and paper manufacturing, “down-the-drain releases” from specific uses (e.g. soaps and detergents, cosmetics, swimming pool chemicals), rubber manufacturing, electroplating, fiberglass insulation manufacturing, cellulose insulation manufacturing, gypsum board manufacturing, engineered wood manufacturing and fertilizer manufacturing. In addition, exposure was assessed for the following sectors based on their potential to release boric acid incidentally (as a by-product): coal-fired power generation, metal mining, base and precious metals smelting and refining, coal mining, oil sands extraction and processing, and wastewater and waste management. Risk quotient (RQ) analyses were performed comparing aquatic concentrations of dissolved or total boron to effect concentrations. RQs were generally low. However, based on the high leachability of boron in slags from certain precious metal recovery operations and high RQs for aquatic organisms identified in the vicinity of one facility from the metal mining sector, it is reasonable to assume that other facilities engaged in similar activities could release elevated concentrations of boric acid to the aquatic environment.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is risk of harm to organisms, but not to the broader integrity of the environment, from boric acid, its salts and its precursors. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that boric acid, its salts and its precursors meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that boric acid, its salts and its precursors do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Boric acid, its salts and its precursors are considered to be toxicologically equivalent. Results from animal experiments demonstrate that boric acid adversely affects fertility, reproduction and development, and these adverse effects observed across species were very similar, both in nature and effective doses. A benchmark dose level (BMDL) of 2.9 mg B/kg of body weight per day (bw/d) for decreased testicular weight derived from two dog toxicity studies has previously been established as a point of departure by Health Canada. Additionally, a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 9.6 mg B/kg bw/d was noted in the rat for developmental effects. Given limitations in the available studies on humans, the effects noted in the animal studies were considered the critical effects for risk characterization.

Canadians are exposed to boric acid from environmental media, food, drinking water and products (this exposure was characterized through the use of biomonitoring data from Canadian and European studies). Total boron measured in blood in individuals provides a measure of integrated exposure for individuals, from all routes (oral, dermal, and inhalation) and all sources (including environmental media, food, and daily- or frequent-use products). Males have higher concentrations of boron in blood than females. For adults, there is a steady increase in the concentration of boron in blood with age; despite this trend in adults, blood boron concentrations are higher overall in children. Intake estimates from environmental media, food, drinking water and uses of certain product types were generated to characterize significant sources of exposure. As boron is considered an essential micronutrient for plant growth, these estimates indicate, as expected, that naturally occurring boron in fruit, vegetables and to a lesser extent drinking water represent primary sources of exposure. Intake estimates from uses of boric acid in arts and craft materials, toys, cosmetics, cleaning products, NHPs, and swimming pool and spa products indicate that these may be significant sources of exposure to boric acid for the general population.

A comparison of estimates of intake predicted from biomonitoring data to critical effect levels in health effect studies results in margins of exposure that are potentially inadequate to address uncertainties in the exposure and health effects databases. Therefore, it is proposed to conclude that boric acid, its salts and its precursors meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that boric acid, its salts and its precursors meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope document for these substances are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances Web site (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Caisse populaire acadienne ltée — Letters patent of continuance and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

July 5, 2016

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation — Order permitting a foreign bank to establish a branch in Canada

Pursuant to subsection 524(1) of the Bank Act, the Minister of Finance made an order on June 15, 2016, permitting Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation to establish a branch in Canada to carry on business in Canada under the name, in English, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation, Canada Branch, and, in French, Banque Sumitomo Mitsui, succursale canadienne.

June 16, 2016

JEREMY RUDIN
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments Web site (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng):

Position Organization Closing date
Vice-Chairperson (Broadcasting) Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission July 25, 2016
Secretary National Battlefields Commission July 26, 2016
Director, Board of Management Canada Revenue Agency July 27, 2016
Chairperson Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board July 28, 2016
Chairperson Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation August 2, 2016
President Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation August 2, 2016
Chairperson Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority August 8, 2016
Full-time and Part-time Members Immigration and Refugee Board August 11, 2016

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks:

Position Organization
Full-time Member National Energy Board
Chairperson Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
Member Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis:

Position Organization
Full-time and Part-time Members (Appeal Division) Social Security Tribunal
Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Income Security Section) Social Security Tribunal
Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Employment Insurance Section) Social Security Tribunal

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