Vol. 150, No. 48 — November 26, 2016

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after assessment of a substance — phenol, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) [triclosan], CAS RN (see footnote 1) 3380-34-5 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas triclosan is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substance pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substance meets one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to His Excellency the Governor in Council that this substance be added to Schedule 1 to the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers are releasing a proposed risk management approach document for this substance on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca) to continue discussions with stakeholders on the manner in which the ministers intend to develop a proposed regulation or instrument respecting preventive or control actions in relation to the substance.

Public comment period on the proposed risk management approach document

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of the proposed risk management approach document, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the proposed risk management approach document. More information regarding the proposed risk management approach may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www. chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, 819-938-5212 (fax), or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the assessment of triclosan

An assessment of triclosan has been conducted under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) to determine if it poses a risk to Canadians and their environment. Triclosan was also scheduled for re-evaluation under Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) pesticide re-evaluation program pursuant to the Pest Control Products Act (PCPA). The preliminary assessment that preceded this assessment report included a proposed conclusion for triclosan under both CEPA and the PCPA. As of December 31, 2014, the Canadian registrants voluntarily discontinued the sale of pest control products containing triclosan. Consequently, triclosan is no longer registered in Canada as a pest control product under the PCPA. Hence, this assessment does not include a conclusion under the PCPA for these products.

Triclosan [phenol, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)] (CAS RN 3380-34-5) is used as a material preservative and as an antimicrobial agent in a wide range of products used by industry and consumers to stop the growth of bacteria, fungi and mildew and to deodorize.

Triclosan does not occur naturally in the environment. The potential sources of exposure to triclosan for Canadians include products used by consumers and that are treated with or contain triclosan (including, but not limited to, cosmetics, non-prescription drugs and natural health products) as well as industrial manufacturing or the formulation of products containing triclosan.

Exposure of the general population to triclosan was characterized using the available Canadian biomonitoring data for triclosan from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) Cycle 2 (2009–2011), the Plastic and Personal-Care Product Use in Pregnancy (P4) Study, and the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) and MIREC-Child Development Plus (MIREC-CD Plus) studies. These data encompass exposure to triclosan from all potential sources and routes, and are considered the most accurate estimates of total exposure of the general population in Canada to triclosan. Similar levels were observed in the recent CHMS, Cycle 3 (2012–2013). Exposure estimates for children under the age of three were derived separately using a combination of Canadian biomonitoring data (for infants and children three to five years old) and additional estimates to account for potential exposures via breast milk, household dust and mouthing of triclosan-treated plastic products.

In examination of the toxicological database as a whole, the principal toxicity in rodents and dogs following ingestion of triclosan is mainly in the liver, with the mouse being the most sensitive species. Triclosan exposure also results in modest decreases in serum thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) levels (but not triiodothyronine [T3] or thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH]) in rats caused by disruption in the target organ (liver) due to rodent-specific metabolism of triclosan. Critical evaluation of the overall database shows that there are no indications of adverse effects on thyroid function in the animal database, and available human data show no changes in thyroid hormone levels or liver function after long-term exposure to low levels of triclosan. Further, humans have a much greater capacity to adapt to deviations in T4 levels than do rodents. Consequently, the overall database does not support the effects of triclosan on thyroid function as a critical effect for risk characterization in humans.

Considering the current available information on the adverse effects of triclosan, an overall database no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 25 mg/kg bw/day was identified from a 90-day oral toxicity study in mice and was conservatively selected to be protective against a number of effects observed in multiple species at higher doses. This NOAEL was considered protective against potential liver effects, if any, that could occur in humans as well as effects in other organs and systems.

Risk to human health from exposure to triclosan is estimated by comparing estimates of exposure in humans with critical effect levels in health effects studies conducted in laboratory animals in order to derive margins of exposure (MOEs). For the general population, comparison of the estimated mean and upper-bound daily intakes with critical effect levels in mice (based on liver effects) resulted in MOEs between 416 and 5 400. For children under the age of three, comparison of aggregate exposure estimates with the critical effect levels resulted in MOEs greater than 3 300. These MOEs were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for triclosan.

A review of all available information on the potential for triclosan to induce antimicrobial resistance (AMR) was conducted. Although there is the potential for triclosan-resistant bacteria to exist in laboratory and clinical settings, this has not been documented outside of clinical use (e.g. household settings, toothpaste use). Based on available information, induction of AMR from current levels of triclosan has not been identified as a concern for human health.

Triclosan can be released to the environment as a result of its use in many products used by consumers, or as a result of the industrial manufacture of products containing triclosan. The use in products is considered to be the major contributor to releases of triclosan down the drain. Triclosan released into wastewater reaches wastewater treatment plants (see footnote 2) (WWTP), where it is partly removed from wastewater, depending on the type of treatment. Triclosan is released to aquatic ecosystems as part of WWTP effluents. Some triclosan partitions to sludge during the wastewater treatment process. As a result, triclosan also reaches terrestrial ecosystems by way of biosolids amendment to agricultural land.

Triclosan degrades relatively quickly in the environment through biotic and abiotic processes. However, it is ubiquitous in the environment due to the continual release to surface water through WWTP effluents. Therefore, chronic exposure of organisms to triclosan is expected in aquatic ecosystems, especially when close to effluent sources. Exposure of soil organisms is also likely through land application of biosolids.

Triclosan is highly toxic to a variety of aquatic organisms, such as algae, macrophytes, invertebrates, amphibians and fish. Adverse effects that have been observed include reduction in growth, reproduction and survival, and there is evidence of effects on the endocrine system at environmentally relevant concentrations. Triclosan can also be highly bioconcentrated in fish, and there is evidence of bioaccumulation in algae and aquatic invertebrates. Triclosan is also highly toxic to certain soil organisms.

Based on an extensive review of the available toxicity data, a predicted no-effect concentration of 376 ng/L was derived for the aquatic compartment. This threshold includes consideration of endocrine disruptive effects in fish and amphibians.

Exposure of aquatic organisms was estimated using measured concentrations of triclosan in the receiving surface waters, including at or near WWTP effluent discharge points. Measured concentrations of triclosan in surface waters across Canada indicate that triclosan may cause harmful effects in aquatic ecosystems.

Concentrations of triclosan in soils were estimated based on the measured concentrations of triclosan in biosolids in Canada, and using parameters such as triclosan half-lives in soil and the regulated application rates for biosolids. Risk characterization that considered the high toxicity to certain soil organisms indicated that triclosan is not likely to cause harmful effects, given the low predicted soil concentrations.

The most notable transformation products of triclosan, formed through metabolism and degradation or chlorination, are methyl-triclosan and certain lower chlorinated dioxins. While most of the triclosan-derived dioxins are considered to be transient in the environment and of low toxicity, methyl-triclosan has similar properties to triclosan, such as high toxicity and bioaccumulation potential. Although chronic exposure to methyl-triclosan is likely in the environment, it has been detected at concentrations much lower than those of triclosan.

Triclosan is always present in aquatic ecosystems due to its continuous releases. It is a very potent chemical that can accumulate in organisms and cause adverse effects even at low exposure levels in the environment. Triclosan can transform to methyl-triclosan and to certain lower chlorinated dioxins. Overall, considering the potency of triclosan, its widespread occurrence and the current exposure levels observed in the Canadian environment, it is concluded that potential for harm exists from exposure to triclosan in aquatic ecosystems.

Conclusions under CEPA

Based on the adequacy of the MOEs between estimates of aggregated exposure to triclosan and critical effect levels, it is concluded that triclosan is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health; thus, it does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this assessment report, there is a risk of harm to organisms, but not to the broader integrity of the environment from triclosan. It is concluded that triclosan meets the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA as it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is concluded that triclosan does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Therefore, it is concluded that triclosan meets one or more of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

Even though it is continuously present in the environment, triclosan has been determined not to meet the persistence criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA. Similarly, while triclosan accumulates in organisms to levels that can cause adverse effects, it does not meet the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

The assessment report and the proposed risk management approach document for this substance are available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

BDO Canada LLP
Auditor
Chicken Farmers of Canada

2016-971

Deloitte LLP
Auditor
and
Auditor General of Canada
Joint auditor
Public Sector Pension Investment Board

2016-966 and 2016-967

KPMG Enterprise
Auditor
Canadian Beef Cattle Research, Market Development and Promotion Agency

2016-970

LaRocque, Judith Anne
Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Full-time member and Vice-Chairperson on an interim basis

2016-974

Levine, Mitchell
Patented Medicine Prices Review Board
Member and Vice-chairperson

2016-973

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Auditor
Canadian Hatching Egg Producers

2016-972

Public Sector Pension Investment Board wholly-owned subsidiaries
Deloitte LLP, Montréal
Auditor
PSP Finco Inc. and PSPIB-RE Summit Inc.
Deloitte LLP, Toronto
Auditor
Revera Inc.
Deloitte & Touche GmbH Wirtschaftsprüfungsgesellschaft of Düsseldorf
Auditor
World Airport Partners Management GmbH and AviAlliance GmbH
Ernst & Young of Christchurch
Auditor
Global Herd NZ Limited and Green Meadows Farm Company Limited
Ernst & Young Audit S.A.S.
Auditor
PSPIB Colcondor S.A.S. and PSPIB Losandes S.A.S.
KPMG AS
Auditor
Infragas Norge AS
PricewaterhouseCoopers of Auckland
Auditor
PSPIB Waiheke Inc.
PricewaterhouseCoopers Auditores, S.L.
Auditor
Global Noray, S.L.U.

2016-968 and 2016-969

Rowe, The Hon. Malcolm H.
Supreme Court of Canada
Puisne Judge

2016-956

November 18, 2016

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Senators called

His Excellency the Governor General has been pleased to summon to the Senate of Canada, by letters latent under the Great Seal of Canada bearing date of November 10, 2016:

November 18, 2016

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Peterborough Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Ryan Donaldson

Ottawa, November 7, 2016

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the York Regional Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Craig Fowlow

Ottawa, November 7, 2016

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Edmonton Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Gregory Lecerf

Ottawa, November 7, 2016

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Ontario Provincial Police as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, November 7, 2016

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the York Regional Police as a fingerprint examiner:

Steve Ross

Ottawa, November 7, 2016

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

CCR RE — Order to insure in Canada risks

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 574(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order to insure in Canada risks, effective November 10, 2016, authorizing CCR RE to insure in Canada risks falling within the following classes of insurance: accident and sickness, aircraft, automobile, boiler and machinery, fidelity, legal expense, liability, marine, property, and surety.

November 11, 2016

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

Toronto Police Widows and Orphans Fund — Letters patent of continuance and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

November 2, 2016

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Director

Canada Pension Plan Investment Board

 

Chairperson

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

December 15, 2016

Chairperson

Destination Canada (Canadian Tourism Commission)

December 1, 2016

Member

Judicial Advisory Committees

 

Director (Federal Representative)

Montréal Port Authority

 

Members

National Capital Commission

November 28, 2016

Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

December 2, 2016

Director (Federal Representative)

Prince Rupert Port Authority

 

Director (Federal Representative)

Sept-Îles Port Authority

 

Director (Federal Representative)

Thunder Bay Port Authority

 

Director (Federal Representative)

Vancouver Fraser Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Via Rail Canada Inc.

December 15, 2016

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Chairperson

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

Directors

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

Members

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Trustees

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

Trustees

Canadian Museum of History

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Trustees

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

Trustees

Canadian Museum of Nature

Permanent Members

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

Directors

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

Citizenship Judges

Citizenship Commission

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Members

National Arts Centre Corporation

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

Commissioner

National Battlefields Commission

Full-time Member

National Energy Board

Members

National Film Board

Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

Trustees

National Gallery of Canada

Vice-Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

Trustees

National Museum of Science and Technology

Director

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

Executive Vice-Chairperson and Member

Parole Board of Canada

Chairperson

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Chairperson and Member

Standards Council of Canada

Member

Telefilm Canada

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

Members — All regional divisions (full-time positions and part-time positions)

Parole Board of Canada

Full-time and Part-time Members (Appeal Division)

Social Security Tribunal

Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Employment Insurance Section)

Social Security Tribunal

Full-time and Part-time Members (General Division — Income Security Section)

Social Security Tribunal

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at October 31, 2016

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

12.8

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

7,001.2

 

Advances to members of Payments Canada (see footnote *)

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

6.0

 
   

7,007.2

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

18,044.7

 

Government of Canada bonds

79,082.0

 

Other investments

410.1

 
   

97,536.8

Property and equipment

 

539.1

Intangible assets

 

34.7

Other assets

 

42.6

 

105,173.2


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

77,200.7

Deposits

Government of Canada

24,542.6

 

Members of Payments Canada (see footnote **)

500.2

 

Other deposits

1,776.9

 
   

26,819.7

Other liabilities

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

649.3

 
   

649.3

   

104,669.7

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

373.5

 
   

503.5

105,173.2

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, November 18, 2016

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, November 18, 2016

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

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