ARCHIVED — Vol. 151, No. 5 — February 4, 2017

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE CANADA

SPECIES AT RISK ACT

Description of Queensnake critical habitat in the Big Creek National Wildlife Area, Long Point National Wildlife Area and St. Clair National Wildlife Area

The Queensnake (Regina septemvittata) is an aquatic snake that is listed on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act. In Canada, the Queensnake occurs in southwestern Ontario, where it inhabits areas containing permanent water bodies and an abundance of cover, such as flat rocks or crayfish burrows.

The Recovery Strategy for the Queensnake (Regina septemvittata) in Canada, available at www.sararegistry.gc.ca/species/speciesDetails_e.cfm?sid=585, identifies the critical habitat for the species in a number of areas, including within federally protected areas.

Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to subsection 58(2) of the Species at Risk Act, subsection 58(1) of that Act applies, 90 days after this publication, to the critical habitat of the Queensnake — identified in the recovery strategy for that species that is included on the Species at Risk Public Registry — that is found within the Big Creek National Wildlife Area, Long Point National Wildlife Area and St. Clair National Wildlife Area, described in Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Area Regulations made pursuant to the Canada Wildlife Act.

Interested parties are invited to contact Environment and Climate Change Canada by email at ec.protectionep-sarprotection.ec@canada.ca to request clarification regarding the location, biophysical attributes and protection of this species’ critical habitat. However, some details may be withheld to protect the species and its critical habitat.

January 28, 2017

Mary Jane Roberts
Director
Species at Risk Act Management and Regulatory Affairs
Canadian Wildlife Service

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) strain ATCC (see footnote 1) 74252 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on this living organism, pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252.

Trichoderma reesei strain ATCC 74252 is a fungus that has characteristics in common with other species of the genus Trichoderma and other strains of the same species. T. reesei, a spore-forming fungus, is able to thrive in soil and on decaying plant matter as a major decomposer of plants, and is thus capable of degrading a variety of plant-based substrates. These properties allow for potential uses of T. reesei in fermentation of plant-based feedstocks, and in production of enzymes and biochemicals used in food, animal feed and in health products. T. reesei is widely considered to be a safe production organism due to its long history of safe use for the production of carbohydrase enzymes such as cellulase.

Trichoderma species, including T. reesei, are capable of producing metabolites called peptaibols. Some T. reesei strains can produce the peptaibol paracelsin as well as other peptaibols. Paracelsin is reported to be harmful to aquatic invertebrates, to mammalian cells, and to mice in experimental conditions where natural barriers were bypassed. Paracelsin has also been reported to have antibiotic and antifungal activity. Paracelsin and other peptaibols production is not thought to occur under the conditions of industry-standard submerged fermentation in which T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is currently used, but could occur under other growth conditions.

T. reesei is not found in Canada. Despite its widespread presence in tropical soils, there are no reports of the species causing adverse effects in aquatic or terrestrial plants or animals in the tropics. In addition, Trichoderma species, including T. reesei, inhibit various plant pathogens.

There is no evidence in the scientific literature indicating that T. reesei is a human pathogen. T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is unlikely to cause infection in healthy or debilitated humans and is susceptible to major clinical antifungal drugs that could be used for treatment in the unlikely event of infection. Repeated exposure to commercial enzyme preparations produced by T. reesei and other Trichoderma species infrequently causes allergic reactions in humans.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with its use in consumer and commercial products and in industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about current uses, the Government launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the notice indicates that 10 000–100 000 kg of T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 dry cell mass was manufactured in Canada in 2008 for industrial uses.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Considerations for follow-up

While exposure of the environment to T. reesei strain ATCC 74252 is not of concern at current levels, this living organism may produce, under certain growth conditions, some secondary metabolites, such as paracelsin and other peptaibols, that may have adverse effects on aquatic invertebrates and mammals. Therefore, there may be a concern for the environment if commercial use patterns were to change or if exposure to the living organism and its secondary metabolites were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure and/or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to the living organism that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of the substance, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — 2-pyrrolidinone, 1-methyl-, CAS RN (see footnote 2) 872-50-4 (NMP), and 2-pyrrolidinone, 1-ethyl-, CAS RN 2687-91-4 (NEP) — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas NMP is a substance on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment, conducted pursuant to section 74 of the Act for NMP and pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) for NEP, is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that these substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these two substances at this time.

Notice is further given that options are being considered for follow-up activities to track changes in exposure to these two substances.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Environment Canada, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of 2-pyrrolidinone, 1-methyl- (NMP) and 2-pyrrolidinone, 1-ethyl- (NEP)

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances referred to collectively herein as the NMP/NEP group. The substance 2-pyrrolidinone, 1-methyl- (NMP) was identified as a priority for assessment as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, whereas the substance 2- pyrrolidinone, 1-ethyl (NEP) was considered a priority as a result of the process identified in the approach for identification of risk assessment priorities. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs), the Domestic Substances List (DSL) names and the acronyms of the substances are listed in the table below.

Substances in the NMP/NEP group

CAS RN

DSL name

Acronym

872-50-4

2-Pyrrolidinone, 1-methyl-

NMP

2687-91-4

2-Pyrrolidinone, 1-ethyl-

NEP

NMP and NEP are solvents that are miscible with water. Depending on the application, NMP is used generally as an organic solvent, intermediate or surfactant in a range of industrial and consumer applications. Products in Canada that contain NMP and that may be available to the general population include paint strippers. As a replacement for NMP, NEP may be used in similar products as those identified for NMP. Both substances are used in Canada in cosmetics and in certain food packaging materials.

With respect to volumes, in 2011, NMP was imported into Canada in quantities ranging from 100 000 to 1 000 000 kg, and NEP was imported in quantities ranging from 1 000 to 10 000 kg. In the United States, NMP is a high production volume (HPV) chemical.

The ecological risk of substances in the NMP/NEP group was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that uses multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified NMP and NEP as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from NMP and NEP. It is proposed to conclude that NMP and NEP do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as NMP and NEP are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

With respect to human health, NMP was assessed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 2015, and NEP was assessed by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) in 2011. In these assessments, developmental toxicity was identified as the critical effect for both NMP and NEP. Potential exposure of the general population to NMP and NEP from use of products was characterized for select uses, namely paint strippers, nail polish remover and body lotion.

Consistent with the U.S. EPA assessment, a comparison of estimated levels of exposure to NMP and critical effect levels results in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. A comparison of estimated levels of exposure to NEP and critical effect levels results in margins of exposure that are considered adequate to account for uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that NMP and NEP do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as NMP and NEP are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that NMP and NEP do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

Considerations for follow-up

While exposure of the general population to these two substances is not of concern at current levels, these substances are considered to have a health effect of concern based on developmental toxicity. Therefore, there may be a concern for human health if exposure to the substances were to increase. Follow-up activities to track changes in human exposure and/or commercial use patterns are under consideration.

Stakeholders are encouraged to provide, during the 60-day public comment period on the draft screening assessment, any information pertaining to these substances that may help inform the choice of follow-up activity. This could include information on new or planned import, manufacture or use of these substances, or information not previously submitted to the ministers.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — oils, lard, sulfurized (sulfurized lard oil), CAS RN (see footnote 3) 61790-49-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on sulfurized lard oil under paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent by mail to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of sulfurized lard oil

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of oils, lard, sulfurized, hereinafter referred to as sulfurized lard oil. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for sulfurized lard oil is 61790-49-6. The substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment based on other human health concerns.

Sulfurized lard oil does not occur naturally in the environment. It is primarily used in lubricants and greases. In 2011, there were no reports of manufacture above the reporting threshold of 100 kg for sulfurized lard oil; between 1 000 and 10 000 kg of sulfurized lard oil were imported into Canada.

The ecological risk of sulfurized lard oil was characterized using the Ecological Risk Classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified sulfurized lard oil as having a low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from sulfurized lard oil. It is proposed to conclude that sulfurized lard oil does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Sulfurized lard oil was not identified as posing a high hazard to human health based on classifications by other national or international agencies for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, developmental toxicity or reproductive toxicity.

In Canada, although there are recognized commercial uses for lubricant products containing sulfurized lard oil, no consumer uses were identified. Sulfurized lard oil is not expected to be present in environmental media at significant concentrations due to low expected releases. Based on these considerations, exposure for the general population is not expected and the potential risk to human health is considered to be low.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that sulfurized lard oil does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that sulfurized lard oil does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Trois-Rivières Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Trois-Rivières Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS section 9.2 of the letters patent sets out a limit on the power of the Authority to borrow money on its credit for port purposes (“borrowing limit”);

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to increase the borrowing limit set out in section 9.2 of the letters patent from $13 million to $42 million;

WHEREAS, by Order in Council P.C. 2016-1166 of December 16, 2016, the Governor in Council, pursuant to subsection 8(5) of the Act, approved a proposed supplementary letters patent provision increasing the aggregate limit on the power of the Authority to borrow money on its credit for port purposes;

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, under the authority of subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

  • 1. Section 9.2 of the letters patent issued to the Trois-Rivières Port Authority is replaced by the following:
    • 9.2 Limit on Borrowing Power. The Authority shall not incur any item of Borrowing so that the aggregate Borrowing of the Authority would exceed $42 million.

ISSUED under my hand to be effective this 17th day of January, 2017.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BANK ACT

Street Capital Bank of Canada — Letters patent of continuance and order to commence and carry on business

Notice is hereby given of the issuance,

  • pursuant to subsection 35(1) of the Bank Act, of letters patent continuing Street Capital Financial Corporation, a company incorporated under the Canada Business Corporations Act, as a bank under the Bank Act under the name, in English, Street Capital Bank of Canada, and, in French, Banque Street Capital du Canada, effective February 1, 2017; and
  • pursuant to subsection 48(3) of the Bank Act, of an order authorizing, in English, Street Capital Bank of Canada, and, in French, Banque Street Capital du Canada, to commence and carry on business, effective February 1, 2017.

January 24, 2017

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Directors

Bank of Canada

February 20, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

February 6, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

February 6, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

February 6, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

February 6, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

February 6, 2017

Directors

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

February 20, 2017

Executive Director

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

February 20, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Regional Member (Manitoba/Saskatchewan)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Regional Member (Ontario)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Broadcasting)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Citizenship Judges

Citizenship Commission

February 14, 2017

Chairperson

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Canada

February 19, 2017

Clerk of the House of Commons

House of Commons

February 26, 2017

Chief Science Advisor

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

February 13, 2017

Chairperson

Laurentian Pilotage Authority Canada

February 5, 2017

Directors

Marine Atlantic Inc.

February 8, 2017

Member

National Arts Centre Corporation

February 5, 2017

Member

National Energy Board

February 8, 2017

Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

February 6, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

February 6, 2017

Director of Public Prosecutions

Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions

February 13, 2017

Executive Vice-Chairperson and Member

Parole Board of Canada

February 5, 2017

Members

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

February 13, 2017

Chief Public Health Officer

Public Health Agency of Canada

February 12, 2017

Directors

Royal Canadian Mint

February 13, 2017

Directors

VIA Rail Canada Inc.

February 8, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Directors

Business Development Bank of Canada

Commissioner for Workers

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Innovation

President

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Directors

Farm Credit Canada

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

Commissioner

National Battlefields Commission

Procurement Ombudsman

Office of the Procurement Ombudsman

Chairperson

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

Chairperson and Member

Standards Council of Canada

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Members — All regional divisions (full-time positions and part-time positions)

Parole Board of Canada

Members (Full-time)

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

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  • Footnote 1
    American Type Culture Collection
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.