ARCHIVED — Vol. 151, No. 7 — February 18, 2017

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GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

CANADA PENSION PLAN

Notice of intent to repeal the Canada Pension Plan (Social Insurance Numbers) Regulations and amend the Canada Pension Plan Regulations

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Employment and Social Development intends to recommend to the Governor in Council that the Canada Pension Plan (Social Insurance Numbers) Regulations (CPP [SIN] Regulations) be repealed and amendments be made to the Canada Pension Plan Regulations (CPP Regulations).

The purpose of these amendments is to ensure a more effective, efficient, and accountable regulatory framework; to streamline regulatory requirements; and to improve clarity and understandability. The CPP (SIN) Regulations were introduced in conjunction with the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) in 1965, and the provisions have remained essentially the same since that time. The Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations (SJCSR) wrote to Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) about the CPP (SIN) Regulations. Specifically, the SJCSR suggested amending section 2, as there is a discrepancy between the English and French versions of the definition of “local office of the Commission” and repealing sections 4 and 6 as they serve no legislative purpose. The SJCSR concerns raised led to a second look at all of the provisions in the CPP (SIN) Regulations. Analysis has shown that the remaining provisions do not hold the importance they once did, with the exception of those provisions that relate to ministerial authority for the assignment of a SIN. Therefore, in addition to the changes recommended by the SJCSR, and as a result of ESDC’s analysis, other sections such as sections 2, 3 and 5 are proposed for repeal, as these sections do not serve a legislative purpose either.

The proposal is to repeal the CPP (SIN) Regulations in their entirety and transfer those provisions, namely sections 7 and 8, that continue to hold relevance, to the CPP Regulations.

In addition to addressing the SJCSR requests, these proposals will support the Treasury Board Secretariat’s (TBS) Red Tape Reduction Action Plan (http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hgw-cgf/priorities-priorites/rtrap-parfa/index-eng.asp), and the “One-for-One” Rule (http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hgw-cgf/priorities-priorites/rtrap-parfa/ofo-upu-eng.asp) such that it is expected to decrease burden on businesses and align with TBS’s Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management (http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/hgw-cgf/priorities-priorites/rtrap-parfa/guides/cdrm-dcgr-eng.asp).

For more information on these regulations, please visit the following addresses: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/C.R.C.,_c._386/page-1.html and http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/C.R.C.%2C_c._385/page-1.html.

Within 30 days of the publication of this notice of intent, any person may submit comments with respect to the proposed CPP Regulations to Marianna Giordano, Director, CPP Policy and Legislation, Seniors and Pensions Policy Secretariat, Income Security and Social Development Branch, Employment and Social Development Canada, 140 Promenade du Portage, 8th Floor, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0J9, 819-654-1672 (telephone), 819-953-9298 (fax), marianna.giordano@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca (email).

February 18, 2017

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 18910

Significant New Activity Notice
(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of paragraph 64(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. In relation to the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, a significant new activity is

  • (a) the use of the substance, in a quantity greater than 10 kg in a calendar year, in the manufacture of any of the following products:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; and
  • (b) any activity involving any of the following products containing the substance, if the product involved in the activity, during any one calendar year, contains a total quantity of the substance greater than 10 kg:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

2. Despite item 1, the use of the substance as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance as these expressions are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance, is not a significant new activity.

3. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the activity begins:

  • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
  • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
  • (c) the information specified in Schedule 9 of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (d) the information specified in subitem 5(h) of Schedule 10 to these Regulations;
  • (e) the test data and the test report from a skin sensitization study, in respect of the substance, which meets the following conditions:
    • (i) it is conducted according to the methodology described in the version that is in effect when the study is conducted of the document entitled Test No. 429: Skin Sensitization — Local Lymph Node Assay, which was published on July 23, 2010, by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, Section 4 — Health Effects, and
    • (ii) it establishes a dose–response relationship in order to determine the dose of the substance that induces skin sensitization and allows an assessment of potency;
  • (f) if the significant new activity involves the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 50 000 kg in a calendar year
    • (i) the information specified in paragraphs 11(3)(a) and (c) to these Regulations, and
    • (ii) the information specified in item 5 of Schedule 10 to these Regulations;
  • (g) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person intending to use the substance for the proposed significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic; and
  • (h) the name of every government department or agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and, if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency.

4. The test data and test reports from the studies referred to in section 3 must be in conformity with the practices described in the version that is in effect when the studies are conducted of the document entitled OECD Principles on Good Laboratory Practice, set out in the Council Decision Amending Annex II to the Council Decision Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted by the OECD on November 26, 1997.

5. The above information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite section 1, in relation to the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and February 28, 2018, a significant new activity is

  • (a) the use of the substance in the manufacture of any of the following products, in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg, during this period:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; and
  • (b) any activity involving any of the following products containing the substance, if the product involved in the activity contains a total quantity greater than 1 000 kg, during this period:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2018, the quantity of the substance referred to in section 1 does not include any quantity of the substance that is used before February 28 of that calendar year.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) to apply the Significant New Activity provisions (SNAc) of that Act to heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice. (see footnote 1)

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, submit a Significant New Activity Notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the significant new activity.

In order to address human health concerns, the Notice targets the use of the substance to manufacture consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) (see footnote 2) applies and cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. (see footnote 3) For the manufacture of such products, notification is required 90 days before use of the substance in quantities greater than 10 kg and additional information is required before use of the substance in quantities greater than 50 000 kg.

For any other activity related to consumer products or cosmetics, notification would be required when, during a calendar year, the total quantity of the substance is greater than 10 kg. For example, notification would be required if a company plans to import a product (for example paint) to be used by consumers where there is more than 10 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year. Examples of products of concern would include, but would not be limited to, do-it-yourself products such as paints, coatings, adhesives, sealants, and epoxies. Therefore, the import, manufacture, or use of the substance for such products as defined in the Notice would require notification. The substance is not known to be currently used in consumer products or in cosmetics in Canada.

Activities not subject to the Notice

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance, a site-limited intermediate or an export-only substance would be excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). (see footnote 4) An export-only substance is a substance that is manufactured in or imported into Canada and destined solely for foreign markets.

This Notice does not apply to products to which the CCPSA does not apply (see Annex A for the CCPSA definition of “consumer product” and exemptions), with the exception of cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. This Notice does not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under the acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. The Notice further does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted intermediates, or in some circumstances to items such as wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the SNAc provisions of CEPA. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information. (see footnote 5)

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, is used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The assessment of the substance identified concerns associated with human health effects for skin sensitization resulting from repeated dermal exposure and significant public exposure for potential new activities. The Significant New Activity Notice is issued to obtain information to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before significant new activities are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and mammalian toxicity data in respect of the substance. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). (see footnote 6)

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers. (see footnote 7)

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture any consumer products or any cosmetic, a threshold of 1 000 kg applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and February 28, 2018. On March 1, 2018, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 10 kg per calendar year.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, (see footnote 8) a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they ought to have access. The phrase “to which they ought to have access” means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant Safety Data Sheets (SDS). (see footnote 9)

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl octadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19100-2, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note, “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject. (see footnote 10)

Under section 86 of CEPA, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice shall notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line. (see footnote 11)

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (see footnote 12) In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

ANNEX A

Consumer product definition in the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (see footnote 13)

In section 2 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), “consumer product” means a product, including its components, parts or accessories, that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes, including for domestic, recreational and sports purposes, and includes its packaging. Section 4 of the CCPSA describes the application of the Act as follows:

Consumer products

4. (1) This Act applies to consumer products with the exception of those listed in Schedule 1.

Tobacco products

(2) This Act applies to tobacco products as defined in section 2 of the Tobacco Act but only in respect of their ignition propensity.

Natural health products

(3) For greater certainty, this Act does not apply to natural health products as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations made under the Food and Drugs Act.

Schedule 1 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (subsection 4(1) and paragraph 37(1)(c))

1. Explosives within the meaning of section 2 of the Explosives Act.

2. Cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

3. Devices within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

4. Drugs within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

5. Food within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

6. Pest control products within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Pest Control Products Act.

7. Vehicles within the meaning of section 2 of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act and a part of a vehicle that is integral to it — as it is assembled or altered before its sale to the first retail purchaser — including a part of a vehicle that replaces or alters such a part.

8. Feeds within the meaning of section 2 of the Feeds Act.

9. Fertilizers within the meaning of section 2 of the Fertilizers Act.

10. Vessels within the meaning of section 2 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

11. Firearms within the meaning of section 2 of the Criminal Code.

12. Ammunition within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.

13. Cartridge magazines within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.

14. Cross-bows within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.

15. Prohibited devices within the meaning of paragraphs (a) to (d) of the definition “prohibited device” in subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.

16. Plants within the meaning of section 3 of the Plant Protection Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).

17. Seeds within the meaning of section 2 of the Seeds Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).

18. Controlled substances within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

19. Aeronautical products within the meaning of subsection 3(1) of the Aeronautics Act.

20. Animals within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Health of Animals Act.

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 18911

Significant New Activity Notice
(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in respect of the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of paragraph 64(c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. In relation to the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, a significant new activity is

  • (a) the use of the substance, in a quantity greater than 10 kg in a calendar year, in the manufacture of any of the following products:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; and
  • (b) any activity involving any of the following products containing the substance, if the product involved in the activity, during any one calendar year, contains a total quantity of the substance greater than 10 kg:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

2. Despite item 1, the use of the substance as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance as these expressions are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance, is not a significant new activity.

3. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the activity begins:

  • (a) a description of the significant new activity in relation to the substance;
  • (b) the anticipated annual quantity of the substance to be used in relation to the significant new activity;
  • (c) the information specified in Schedule 9 of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (d) the information specified in subitem 5(h) of Schedule 10 to these Regulations;
  • (e) the test data and the test report from a skin sensitization study, in respect of the substance, which meets the following conditions:
    • (i) it is conducted according to a methodology described in the version that is in effect when the study is conducted of the document entitled Test No. 429: Skin Sensitization  Local Lymph Node Assay, which was published on July 23, 2010, by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, Section 4 Health Effects, and
    • (ii) it establishes a dose–response relationship in order to determine the dose of the substance that induces skin sensitization and allows an assessment of potency;
  • (f) if the significant new activity involves the use of the substance in a quantity greater than 50 000 kg in a calendar year
    • (i) the information specified in paragraphs 11(3)(a) and (c) to these Regulations, and
    • (ii) the information specified in item 5 of Schedule 10 to these Regulations;
  • (g) all other information or test data in respect of the substance that are in the possession of the person intending to use the substance for the proposed significant new activity, or to which they have access, and that are relevant to determining whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic; and
  • (h) the name of every government department or agency, either outside or within Canada, to which the person proposing the significant new activity has provided information regarding the use of the substance and, if known, the department’s or agency’s file number and, if any, the outcome of the department’s or agency’s assessment and the risk management actions in relation to the substance imposed by the department or agency.

4. The test data and test reports from the studies referred to in section 3 must be in conformity with the practices described in the version that is in effect when the studies are conducted of the document entitled OECD Principles on Good Laboratory Practice, set out in the Council Decision Amending Annex II to the Council Decision Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted by the OECD on November 26, 1997.

5. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite section 1, in relation to the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl ether, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and February 28, 2018, a significant new activity is

  • (a) the use of the substance in the manufacture of any of the following products, in a quantity greater than 1 000 kg, during this period:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act; and
  • (b) any activity involving any of the following products containing the substance, if the product involved in the activity contains a total quantity greater than 1 000 kg, during this period:
    • (i) a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, or
    • (ii) a cosmetic, within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2018, the quantity of the substance referred to in section 1 does not include any quantity of the substance that is used before February 28 of that calendar year.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

A Significant New Activity Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) to apply the Significant New Activity provisions (SNAc) of that Act to heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice. (see footnote 14)

A Significant New Activity Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, submit a Significant New Activity Notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the significant new activity.

In order to address human health concerns, the Notice would target the use of the substance to manufacture consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) (see footnote 15) applies and cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. (see footnote 16) For the manufacture of such products, notification is required 90 days before use of the substance in a quantity greater than 10 kg and additional information is required before use of the substance in quantities greater than 50 000 kg.

For any other activity related to consumer products or cosmetics, notification would be required when, during a calendar year, the total quantity of the substance is greater than 10 kg. For example, notification would be required if a company plans to import a product (e.g. paint) to be used by consumers where there is more than 10 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year. Examples of products of concern would include, but would not be limited to, do-it-yourself products such as paints, coatings, adhesives, sealants, and epoxies. Therefore, the import, manufacture, or use of the substance for such products as defined in the Notice would require notification. The substance is not known to be currently used in consumer products or in cosmetics in Canada.

Activities not subject to the Notice

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance, a site-limited intermediate or an export-only substance would be excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). (see footnote 17) An export-only substance is a substance that is manufactured in or imported into Canada and destined solely for foreign markets.

This Notice does not apply to products to which the CCPSA does not apply (see Annex A for the CCPSA definition of “consumer product” and exemptions), with the exception of cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act. This Notice also does not apply to uses of the substance that are regulated under the acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of CEPA, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act. The Notice further does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted intermediates, or in some circumstances to items such as wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the SNAc provisions of CEPA. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of CEPA, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances (Chemicals and Polymers) for additional information. (see footnote 18)

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, is used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct human health and environmental assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The assessment of the substance identified concerns associated with human health effects for skin sensitization resulting from repeated dermal exposure and significant public exposure for potential new activities. The Significant New Activity Notice is issued to obtain information to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before significant new activities are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and mammalian toxicity data in respect of the substance. Some of the proposed information requirements are set out in the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers). (see footnote 19)

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers. (see footnote 20)

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured up to a 1 000 kg of the substance and started activities with it. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used to manufacture any consumer products or any cosmetic, a threshold of 1 000 kg applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and February 28, 2018. On March 1, 2018, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 10 kg per calendar year.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions (see footnote 21), a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they ought to have access. The phrase “to which they ought to have access” means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product, are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant Safety Data Sheets (SDSs). (see footnote 22)

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a purchased product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance heteromonocycle, 2-methyl-, polymer with oxirane, carboxymethyl hexadecyl, Confidential Accession No. 19101-3, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of CEPA, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject. (see footnote 23)

Under section 86 of CEPA, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc notice shall notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any significant new activity and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line. (see footnote 24)

CEPA is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999. (see footnote 25) In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

ANNEX A

Consumer product definition in the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (see footnote 26)

In section 2 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA), “consumer product” means a product, including its components, parts or accessories, that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes, including for domestic, recreational and sports purposes, and includes its packaging. Section 4 of the CCPSA describes the application of the Act as follows:

Consumer products

4. (1) This Act applies to consumer products with the exception of those listed in Schedule 1.

Tobacco products

(2) This Act applies to tobacco products as defined in section 2 of the Tobacco Act but only in respect of their ignition propensity.

Natural health products

(3) For greater certainty, this Act does not apply to natural health products as defined in subsection 1(1) of the Natural Health Products Regulations made under the Food and Drugs Act.

Schedule 1 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (subsection 4(1) and paragraph 37(1)(c))

  1. Explosives within the meaning of section 2 of the Explosives Act.
  2. Cosmetics within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  3. Devices within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  4. Drugs within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  5. Food within the meaning of section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.
  6. Pest control products within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Pest Control Products Act.
  7. Vehicles within the meaning of section 2 of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act and a part of a vehicle that is integral to it — as it is assembled or altered before its sale to the first retail purchaser — including a part of a vehicle that replaces or alters such a part.
  8. Feeds within the meaning of section 2 of the Feeds Act.
  9. Fertilizers within the meaning of section 2 of the Fertilizers Act.
  10. Vessels within the meaning of section 2 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.
  11. Firearms within the meaning of section 2 of the Criminal Code.
  12. Ammunition within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  13. Cartridge magazines within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  14. Cross-bows within the meaning of subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  15. Prohibited devices within the meaning of paragraphs (a) to (d) of the definition “prohibited device” in subsection 84(1) of the Criminal Code.
  16. Plants within the meaning of section 3 of the Plant Protection Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).
  17. Seeds within the meaning of section 2 of the  Seeds Act, except for Jequirity beans (abrus precatorius).
  18. Controlled substances within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.
  19. Aeronautical products within the meaning of subsection 3(1) of the Aeronautics Act.
  20. Animals within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Health of Animals Act.

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Arthrobacter globiformis (A. globiformis) strain ATCC (see footnote 27) 8010 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of Arthrobacter globiformis strain ATCC 8010

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Arthrobacter globiformis (A. globiformis) strain ATCC 8010.

A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 is a soil bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species. A. globiformis is nutritionally versatile and reported to be ubiquitous in freshwater, saltwater and soils. The characteristics of A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 make it suitable for use in food production, biocontrol, probiotic use in humans and animals, biodegradation and water and wastewater treatment.

There are no reported adverse effects in terrestrial or aquatic plants, invertebrates or vertebrates, or infections in humans associated with this specific Domestic Substances List strain, or other strains of A. globiformis.

This screening assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about the current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to this section 71 notice indicates that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that A. globiformis strain ATCC 8010 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of a living organism — Cellulomonas biazotea (C. biazotea) strain ATCC (see footnote 28) 486 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Cellulomonas biazotea strain ATCC 486 is a living organism on the Domestic Substances List identified under subsection 105(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on this living organism pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that this living organism does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this living organism at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Public comment period

As specified under subsection 77(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice, and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of Cellulomonas biazotea strain ATCC 486

Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of Cellulomonas biazotea strain ATCC 486.

C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 is a soil bacterium that has characteristics in common with other strains of the species. The characteristics of C. biazotea make it suitable for use in animal feed supplements, fertilizers, biodegradation and biofuel production.

There are no reported adverse effects in terrestrial or aquatic plants, invertebrates or vertebrates, or infections in humans associated with this specific Domestic Substances List strain, or other strains of C. biazotea.

This assessment considers the aforementioned characteristics of C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 with respect to environmental and human health effects associated with consumer and commercial product use and industrial processes subject to CEPA, including releases to the environment through waste streams and incidental human exposure through environmental media. To update information about the current uses of this micro-organism, the Government of Canada launched a mandatory information-gathering survey under section 71 of CEPA, as published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on October 3, 2009 (section 71 notice). Information submitted in response to the section 71 notice indicates that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 was not imported into or manufactured in Canada in 2008.

Based on the information available, it is proposed to conclude that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends. It is also proposed to conclude that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that C. biazotea strain ATCC 486 does not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this living organism is available on the Government of Canada’s Chemical Substances website (www.chemicalsubstances.gc.ca).

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ACT

Notice of annual increase of Health Canada’s Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product fees

Notice is hereby given that the Minister of Health, under the Ministerial Authority to Enter into Contract, hereby updates the fees that are payable for the provision of Drug Master Files and Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product services by 2%, beginning April 1, 2017. These fees will continue to be updated annually, with an automatic 2% increase to align with the Drug Program’s regulatory user fees.

The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2017, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Deryck Trehearne, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone), cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

Services

Fee as of April 1, 2016

Fee as of April 1, 2017

Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product (or a supplemental copy of a Certificate of a Pharmaceutical Product)

$84

$86

Drug Master Files

$433

$442

Drug Master Files — letter of access

$196

$200

Drug Master Files — biannual updates

$196

$200

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT

Notice of annual increase of fees pursuant to Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations

Notice is hereby given, under section 19.2 of the Financial Administration Act, that in keeping with section 4 of the 2011 Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations, every fee outlined by the Regulations is to be increased annually by 2%, rounded up to the nearest dollar.

The current fees and the fees updated as of April 1, 2017, are listed below.

Any inquiries or comments about the updated fees can be directed to Deryck Trehearne, Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, 613-957-6690 (telephone), cri_irc_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

Fee Category

Section in Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Regulations

Fee as of April 1, 2016

Fee as of April 1, 2017

PART 2 — DRUGS

Fees For Examination Services — Schedule 1

New active substance

6

$335,068

$341,770

Clinical or non-clinical data and chemistry and manufacturing data

6

$169,711

$173,106

Clinical or non-clinical data only

6

$79,209

$80,794

Comparative studies

6

$47,876

$48,834

Chemistry and manufacturing data only

6

$22,636

$23,089

Published data only

6

$18,771

$19,147

Switch status from prescription drug to non-prescription drug

6

$45,579

$46,491

Labelling only

6

$3,050

$3,111

Administrative submission

6

$317

$324

Disinfectants

6

$4,220

$4,305

Drug identification number application —labelling standards

6

$1,692

$1,726

Remission

Remission processing fee

11(1)(a)(iii)

$554

$566

Establishment Licence Fees

Fabrication of Drugs — Schedule 2

Basic fee

19(1), 27, 28(1)(a), 28(2)(a)

$17,060

$17,402

Each additional category

19(1)(a)

$4,275

$4,361

Dosage form classes

 

2 classes

19(1)(b)

$8,537

$8,708

3 classes

19(1)(b)

$17,060

$17,402

4 classes

19(1)(b)

$21,335

$21,762

5 classes

19(1)(b)

$25,594

$26,106

6 classes

19(1)(b)

$29,856

$30,454

Each additional class

19(1)(b)

$1,713

$1,748

Sterile dosage forms

19(1)(c)

$8,537

$8,708

Packing/Labelling of Drugs — Schedule 3

Basic fee

20(1), 20(3)(a), 28(1)(b), 28(2)(b)

$11,407

$11,636

Each additional category

20(1)(a)

$2,850

$2,907

Dosage form classes

 

2 classes

20(1)(b)

$5,689

$5,803

3 or more classes

20(1)(b)

$8,537

$8,708

Importation and Distribution of Drugs — Schedule 4

Basic fee

21(a), 22, 28(1)(c) and (d), 28(2)(c) and (d)

$7,113

$7,256

Each additional category

21(a)(i), 22(a)

$1,780

$1,816

Dosage form classes

 

2 classes

21(a)(ii), 22(b)

$3,558

$3,630

3 or more classes

21(a)(ii), 22(b)

$7,113

$7,256

Each fabricator

21(b)(i)

$1,713

$1,748

Each additional dosage form class for each fabricator

21(b)(ii)

$863

$881

Distribution or Wholesaling

Distribution or wholesaling fee

23

$4,275

$4,361

Testing

Testing fee

24

$2,850

$2,907

Drug Analysis — Schedule 5

Vaccines (1)

25

$28,432

$29,001

Drugs, not included in items 1, 6 and 9 of this Schedule, that are listed in Schedule D to the Food and Drugs Act

25

$11,375

$11,603

Drugs for human use that are prescription drugs, controlled drugs or narcotics

25

$8,537

$8,708

Drugs for human use, not included in any other item, for which a drug identification number has been assigned

25

$4,275

$4,361

Radiopharmaceuticals

25

$0

$0

Whole blood and its components (6)

25

$0

$0

Hemodialysis products

25

$0

$0

Drugs that are labelled as disinfectants, including those listed in paragraph 9(f) of this Schedule, but excluding other drugs labelled as disinfectants of medical devices

25

$0

$0

Drugs that meet the requirements of a class monograph having one of the following titles (9)

Acne therapies

25

$0

$0

Antidandruff products

25

$0

$0

Antiperspirants

25

$0

$0

Antiseptic skin cleaners

25

$0

$0

Athlete’s foot treatments

25

$0

$0

Contact lens disinfectants 9(f)

25

$0

$0

Fluoride-containing anti-caries products

25

$0

$0

Medicated skin care products

25

$0

$0

Sunburn protectants

25

$0

$0

Throat lozenges

25

$0

$0

Fees for the Examination of Dealer’s Licence Applications

Dealer’s Licence

Dealer’s licence

31(1)

$4,982

$5,082

Fees for Right to Sell Drugs

Annual fee

35(1)

$1,129

$1,152

PART 3 — MEDICAL DEVICE FEES

Fees for the Examination of Medical Device Licence Applications

Class II Medical Devices

Class II — Licence application

39(1)

$389

$397

Class III Medical Devices — Schedule 6

Licence application

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$5,579

$5,691

Licence application for a near patient in vitro diagnostic device

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$9,497

$9,687

Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$1,404

$1,433

Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations

40(1)(a), 41(a)

$5,225

$5,330

Class IV Medical Devices — Schedule 7

Licence application

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$12,975

$13,235

Licence application for devices that contain human or animal tissue

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$12,104

$12,347

Licence application for a near patient in vitro diagnostic device

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$22,117

$22,560

Change referred to in paragraph 34(a) of the Medical Devices Regulations that relates to manufacturing

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$1,404

$1,433

Any other change referred to in paragraph 34(a) or (b) of the Medical Devices Regulations

40(1)(b), 41(b)

$5,953

$6,073

Remission

Remission processing fee

44(1)(a)(iii)

$59

$61

Fee for Right to Sell Licensed Class II, III or IV Medical Devices

Fee (if annual gross revenue medical device sales is less than $20,000)

48(1)(a)

$59

$61

Fee (in any other case)

48(1)(b)

$367

$375

Fees for the Examination of an Application for an Establishment Licence

Medical devices establishment licence

51(1)

$7,950

$8,109

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Canadian Grain Commission

 

Commissioner and assistant chief commissioner

 

Chorney, Anthony Douglas

2017-61

Commissioner

 

McKague, Lonny

2017-62

Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

 

Full-time members

 

Gaudreault, Gabriel

2017-63

Marchildon, Sophie

2017-64

Mercer, Kristen

2017-65

Part-time member

 

Lustig, Edward Peter

2017-66

Special Advisers to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Dion, The Hon. Stéphane, P.C.

2017-67

McCallum, The Hon. John, P.C.

2017-68

(see footnote 29) Williams, The Hon. James W.

2016-1013

Nunavut Court of Justice

 

Deputy Judge

 

February 7, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Instrument of Advice dated January 26, 2017

Rodriguez, Pablo

Queen’s Privy Council for Canada

Member

February 7, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

[7-1-o]

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-006-17 — Release of ICES-002, Issue 6 (Amendment 1)

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) is extending the current transition period to January 1, 2018, regarding the following standard:

  • Interference-Causing Equipment Standard ICES-002, Issue 6 (Amendment 1), Vehicles, Boats and Other Devices Propelled by an Internal Combustion Engine, Electrical Means or Both (http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf10605.html).

Within the standard compliance, either ICES-002, Issue 5, or ICES-002, Issue 6, will be accepted for vehicles, boats and other devices propelled by diesel engines only.

This document will come into force upon its publication on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Official Publications web page (http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf01841.html).

General information

The Interference-Causing Equipment Standards (ICES) List (http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/h_sf06127.html) will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to submit any questions on ICES-002, Issue 6 (Amendment 1), within 90 days of the date of publication of this notice using the online “General Inquiry” form at http://www.ic.gc.ca/res_general. Comments and suggestions for improving these standards may be submitted online using the “Standard Change Request” form at http://www.ic.gc.ca/res_change.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

February 2017

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

[7-1-o]

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Directors

Bank of Canada

February 20, 2017

Directors

Business Development Bank of Canada

March 1, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

February 21, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

February 21, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Canadian Museum of History

February 21, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

February 21, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Museum of Nature

February 21, 2017

Directors

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

February 20, 2017

Executive Director

Canadian Race Relations Foundation

February 20, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Regional Member (Manitoba/Saskatchewan)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Regional Member (Ontario)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Broadcasting)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

February 20, 2017

Directors

Farm Credit Canada

February 28, 2017

Chairperson

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority Canada

February 19, 2017

Clerk of the House of Commons

House of Commons

February 26, 2017

Chairperson

National Capital Commission

February 27, 2017

Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

February 21, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

National Gallery of Canada

February 21, 2017

Commissioner

Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada

March 6, 2017

Chairperson

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

March 6, 2017

Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

March 6, 2017

Chairperson

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Members

Standards Council of Canada

March 6, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

Commissioner for Workers

Canada Employment Insurance Commission

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Innovation

President

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety

Chairperson

Canadian International Trade Tribunal

Directors

First Nations Financial Management Board

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

Commissioner

National Battlefields Commission

Procurement Ombudsman

Office of the Procurement Ombudsman

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Members (full-time)

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

[7-1-o]

  • Footnote 1
    The Policy on the Use of Significant New Activity Provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=5CA18D66-1.
  • Footnote 2
    The full text of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-1.68/ FullText.html.
  • Footnote 3
    The full text of the Food and Drugs Act is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/f-27/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 4
    The full text of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 5
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 6
    The full text of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 7
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 8
    A comprehensive listing of substances that are subject to SNAc provisions is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=0F76206A-1.
  • Footnote 9
    Formerly “Material Safety Data Sheets” (MSDSs). Please refer to the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment at http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2015/2015-02-11/html/sor-dors19-eng.php.
  • Footnote 10
    The advisory note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=CC526AE6-1.
  • Footnote 11
    The Substances Management Information Line can be contacted at eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email), 1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada), and 819-938-3232 (outside of Canada).
  • Footnote 12
    The Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at https://www.ec.gc.ca/alef-ewe/default.asp?lang=en&n=AF0C5063-1.
  • Footnote 13
    This annex is provided for information purposes only. In the event of a discrepancy between this document and the Canadian Consumer Product Safety Act, the Canadian Consumer Product Safety Act shall prevail.
  • Footnote 14
    The Policy on the Use of Significant New Activity Provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/ese-ees/default.asp?lang=En&n=5CA18D66-1.
  • Footnote 15
    The full text of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-1.68/ FullText.html.
  • Footnote 16
    The full text of the Food and Drugs Act is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/f-27/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 17
    The full text of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 18
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 19
    The full text of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) is available at http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2005-247/FullText.html.
  • Footnote 20
    The Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers are available at http://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/280464/publication.html.
  • Footnote 21
    A comprehensive listing of substances that are subject to SNAc provisions is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=0F76206A-1.
  • Footnote 22
    Formerly “Material Safety Data Sheets” (MSDSs). Please refer to the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment at http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2015/2015-02-11/html/sor-dors19-eng.php.
  • Footnote 23
    The advisory note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” is available at http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=CC526AE6-1.
  • Footnote 24
    The Substances Management Information Line can be contacted at eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca (email), 1-800-567-1999 (toll-free in Canada), 819-938-3232 (outside of Canada).
  • Footnote 25
    The Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 is available at https://www.ec.gc.ca/alef-ewe/default.asp?lang=en&n=AF0C5063-1.
  • Footnote 26
    This annex is provided for information purposes only. In the event of a discrepancy between this document and the Canadian Consumer Product Safety Act, the Canadian Consumer Product Safety Act shall prevail.
  • Footnote 27
    American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 28
    American Type Culture Collection.
  • Footnote 29
    Correction