Vol. 151, No. 34 — August 26, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

MIGRATORY BIRDS CONVENTION ACT, 1994

Notice with respect to temporary possession of migratory bird carcasses

In order to conduct a survey for avian viruses, the Minister of the Environment issues this notice under the authority of section 36 of the Migratory Birds Regulations to vary the application of paragraph 6(b) of the Migratory Birds Regulations to allow for the temporary possession of found dead migratory birds. A person is permitted to temporarily possess dead migratory birds to allow for swift delivery of such birds to provincial or territorial authorities for analysis. In all other circumstances, a prohibition against possessing the carcass of a migratory bird remains in effect. This notice comes into force for a period of one year from August 26, 2017. The Government of Canada is responsible, under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, to ensure that populations of migratory birds are maintained, protected and conserved.

The Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative coordinates Canada’s Inter-Agency Wild Bird Influenza Survey. Information on where to submit found dead migratory birds is available by viewing the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative website at http://www.cwhc-rcsf.ca/ or by telephoning 1-800-567-2033. Guidance on precautions for the handling of wild birds is available from the Public Health Agency of Canada on its website at www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/influenza/fs-hwb-fr-mos-eng.php.

August 26, 2017

Robert McLean
Director General
Assessment and Regulatory Affairs
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three distillate aromatic extract substances — extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent, CAS RN (see footnote 1) 64742-04-7; extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent, CAS RN 64742-05-8; and extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent, CAS RN 64742-11-6 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent; extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent; and extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of distillate aromatic extracts

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of the following distillate aromatic extract substances:

CAS RN

Name on the Domestic Substances List

64742-04-7

Extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent

64742-05-8

Extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent

64742-11-6

Extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent

Distillate aromatic extracts (DAEs) under the three Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RNs) 64742-04-7 [extracts (petroleum), heavy paraffinic distillate solvent], 64742-05-8 [extracts (petroleum), light paraffinic distillate solvent] and 64742-11-6 [extracts (petroleum), heavy naphthenic distillate solvent] were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

Aromatic extracts are a class of substances derived from solvent extraction of crude oil vacuum distillation distillate and residual streams. CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6 are distillate aromatic extracts, a subset of the broad class of aromatic extracts as they originate from the vacuum distillation stream. Due to their untreated nature, they have high levels of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These substances are consumed on-site at refineries and are also transported in Canada via trains and trucks for use at industrial and commercial facilities.

Estimation of mixture behaviours was accomplished through the use of a suite of representative structures that are expected to be present in these DAEs. In general, the components of DAEs are poorly soluble in water, are very hydrophobic, and are moderately to poorly volatile, although some will evaporate readily from water. DAEs are expected to reside predominantly in sediment and soil, with some lighter components partitioning to air.

Petroleum-derived oils that include distillate aromatic extracts can be used as extender oils in the formulation of plastic and rubber products to achieve elasticity and make brittle materials soft and flexible. Extender oils are also a major ingredient in the production of vehicle tires and are therefore found in crumb rubber (i.e. bits of recycled tires that can be used in the production of rubberized playground and athletic surfaces). Historically, automobile tires were formulated with high PAH extender oils (i.e. DAEs), although recent changes in domestic manufacturing have seen these replaced with other low PAH oils. Therefore, there may be residual general population exposure to these distillate aromatic extracts if they have been previously used as extender oils in tire production, where old tires have been recycled into crumb rubber and incorporated in rubber playground and athletic surfaces. There is the potential that these crumb rubber surfaces may release component substances, including PAHs, by off-gassing, through natural surface degradation, and during mechanical abrasion and direct contact with skin. Two DAEs (CAS RNs 64742-11-6 and 64742-04-7) are reported as being in industrial and professional use products such as rubbers, adhesives, sealants, solvents and roofing materials.

For the ecological assessment, environmental concentrations were estimated for major ecological exposure scenarios, including manufacturing of rubber products, manufacturing of other products, and runoff from tire wear and road care products that are not mixed with asphalt. Levels of exposure in the aquatic environment are well below those expected to cause harm to aquatic organisms.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that the distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of these distillate aromatic extracts was carcinogenicity, based on classifications by international agencies. Skin painting studies conducted in laboratory animals show skin tumour formation following chronic dermal exposure to these substances. They have also produced positive results in in vitro genotoxicity assays and exhibit reproductive toxicity in dermally exposed laboratory animals. These effects are attributed to the high PAH content of distillate aromatic extracts.

Exposure and risk to human health were characterized for the distillate aromatic extract CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6, considering that exposure may occur during their production and storage at refineries, during bulk transportation between industrial facilities, and from their potential presence in crumb rubber derived from old tire stocks. In addition, compositional testing of Canadian marketplace plastic and rubber products was used to assess whether these substances are found in products available for purchase by the general population.

The vapour pressure of aromatic extracts is low; therefore, inhalation exposure to these substances during transportation and production and storage at refineries is low. Crumb rubber extracted with biological fluids did not release PAHs; therefore, any oral or dermal exposure to crumb rubber is not expected to give rise to a significant exposure to aromatic extracts. Air monitoring studies that quantified the benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) concentration in air from the off-gassing of rubberized surfaces under ideal weather conditions showed both no increase and only an incremental increase above background B[a]P levels typically found in ambient air. As exposure is either not expected or, if exposure does occur, is expected to be transient and at incremental levels, risk to human health is likewise considered to be low.

High PAH oils, including these distillate aromatic extracts, have the potential to be used as extender oils in the production of rubber and plastic consumer products. Results from the compositional analysis of commonly available soft rubber and plastic marketplace products in Canada indicate that these distillate aromatic extracts are not being used in these product formulations.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that the distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that the three distillate aromatic extracts (CAS RNs 64742-04-7, 64742-05-8 and 64742-11-6) do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of two substances — asphalt, CAS RN (see footnote 2)8052-42-4, and oxidized asphalt, CAS RN 64742-93-4 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas asphalt and oxidized asphalt are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Jane Philpott
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of asphalt and oxidized asphalt

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two substances known as asphalt and oxidized asphalt.

CAS RN

Name on the Domestic Substances List

8052-42-4

Asphalt

64742-93-4

Asphalt, oxidized

Asphalt (CAS RN 8052-42-4) and oxidized asphalt (CAS RN 64742-93-4) were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. These substances were included in the Petroleum Sector Stream Approach (PSSA) because they are related to the petroleum sector and are considered to be of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials (UVCBs).

Asphalt and oxidized asphalt are complex combinations of high molecular weight organic compounds containing a relatively high proportion of hydrocarbons; carbon (C) numbers are predominantly greater than C25 with high carbon-to-hydrogen ratios. They are residual substances derived from the high temperature vacuum distillation of petroleum. The composition and physical-chemical properties of asphalt and oxidized asphalt vary depending on the sources of crude oil, processing steps and blending stocks involved in their production.

Asphalt and oxidized asphalt are used primarily (approximately 99%) in the construction of roads and in roofing materials, but they may be found in adhesives and sealants, paints and coatings, and other miscellaneous products available to consumers. Other residual substances in the asphalt group with different CAS RNs might also be added into asphalt formulations if they meet the material specifications. As data on asphalt formulations (final formulated products) generally do not specify a CAS RN, and all residuals are expected to behave similarly when used in these products, the results of the analyses herein on these asphalt formulations for the purpose of assessing asphalt and oxidized asphalt may also apply to other substances in the asphalt group. For the purpose of this assessment the term “asphalts” is used to refer to different grades and types of asphalt (CAS RN 8052-42-4) and oxidized asphalts (CAS RN 64742-93-4).

Release of hazardous components of asphalts to the environment is considered to be low based on experimental studies on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) leaching from paving and roofing asphalt formulations. In addition, asphalts can stabilize and entrap contaminants or other petroleum substances mixed with asphalts, making them unavailable to organisms or the environment.

Based on physical-chemical properties such as high Kow, high Koc, very low vapour pressure and very low water solubility under environment-relevant conditions, asphalt components are not expected to disperse in the environment or to be bioavailable. Modelled ecotoxicity data, and results from ecological toxicity studies on bean and corn seeds exposed to oxidized asphalt indicate low toxicity. Use of hot-mix asphalt as lining for fish ponds, and low aquatic toxicity of runoff from unsealed asphalt pavement also indicate that the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of asphalts are very low. Although spills of asphalt materials are reported, asphalts are not likely to disperse in the environment because of their low mobility. The lack of bioavailability and low toxicity of asphalts also indicate that the ecological concern of spilled asphalt materials is considered to be low.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms or the broader integrity of the environment from these substances. It is concluded that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

A critical health effect for the initial categorization of asphalt and oxidized asphalt was carcinogenicity, based on classifications by international agencies. PAHs and benzene, minor components of asphalts, have been identified by Health Canada and several international regulatory agencies as carcinogens. PAHs (as represented by benzo[a]pyrene equivalents) and benzene were therefore selected as high-hazard components of asphalts for use in characterizing long-term exposure and risk to the general population in the vicinity of asphalt production and storage facilities. Naphthalene, a volatile PAH, was selected to characterize shorter term exposures to bystanders.

The potential for exposure of the general population to asphalts includes consideration of inhalation exposure in the vicinity of either asphalt-producing and refining industries or near paving operations. Dermal exposure can occur from use of consumer products, including as a result of application of asphalt-based pavement sealants in residential settings. Long-term oral exposure to components of asphalts (i.e. PAHs) can occur, as components of asphalts may migrate indoors from asphalt surfaces and be found in house dust. Risks to human health were characterized for these potential exposures.

For short-term inhalation exposure in the vicinity of paving operations, a margin of exposure based on a conservative exposure of a bystander to naphthalene, and the effect level in exposed animals causing a local effect on nasal olfactory epithelium, was considered adequate. Short-term dermal exposure to asphalts from asphalt-containing products is not considered to constitute a risk to human health due to a lack of toxicity exhibited by asphalt in short-term animal studies, and due to low dermal absorption of asphalts.

For potential inhalation exposures to asphalts from fugitive and point releases from the production and refinement of asphalt in the vicinity of facilities, margins of exposure between conservative estimates of exposures to benzene and to PAHs, and estimates of cancer potency previously developed for inhalation exposure to benzene and to PAHs, are considered adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure databases.

For potential long-term oral exposure to components of asphalts that may migrate indoors over time from asphalt driveway seal coat (where exposure is through ingestion of house dust that contains asphalt-derived PAHs), margins of exposure between oral exposure to PAHs and a conservative point of departure for benzo[a]pyrene are considered adequate to address uncertainties in health effects and exposure databases.

Therefore, general population exposure to asphalt and oxidized asphalt is not considered to constitute a risk to human health.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that asphalt and oxidized asphalt (CAS RNs 8052-42-4 and 64742-93-4) do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CONTROLLED DRUGS AND SUBSTANCES ACT

Notice to interested parties — Proposed regulations amending Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations to authorize access to substances subject to temporary controls under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

This notice provides interested stakeholders with the opportunity to provide comments on Health Canada’s proposal to amend Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR) to provide a framework that could be used to authorize access for research purposes to substances subject to temporary controls under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA).

Temporary Accelerated Scheduling amendments under Bill C-37, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related amendments to other Acts, came into force on May 18, 2017. No substances are subject to temporary scheduling controls at this time.

The recent legislative amendments provide the Minister of Health the authority to place temporary CDSA controls on a substance if the Minister has reasonable grounds to believe that it

  • (a) poses a significant risk to public health or safety; or
  • (b) may pose a risk to public health or safety and
    • (i) is being imported into Canada with no legitimate purpose, or
    • (ii) is being distributed in Canada with no legitimate purpose.

Temporary controls would be in effect for one year, with a possible extension for an additional year. During this time, Health Canada would determine, through consultation with stakeholders and Canadians more broadly, whether long-term controls are warranted. If long-term controls are determined to be warranted, Health Canada would be required to complete the standard regulatory process. Once a substance is temporarily controlled under Schedule V to the CDSA by a Ministerial Order, activities such as importation, exportation, production, and distribution of the substance would be prohibited. There would be no possession offence for such substances.

There is currently no regulatory framework to facilitate access for research purposes to substances under temporary control. Part J of the FDR regulates the use of controlled substances with no recognized therapeutic uses. These substances are defined as “restricted drugs” and can be used for research purposes with authorization from the Minister. Adding temporarily scheduled substances to the Schedule in Part J of the FDR would allow these substances to be available for research purposes.

In order to facilitate legitimate access to temporarily controlled substances, the regulatory amendments proposed here would grant the Minister of Health the authority in Part J of the FDR to add to its schedule, temporarily controlled substances listed in Schedule V to the CDSA. This would be done by Ministerial Order. The Minister would also be granted the authority to delete, by order, such a substance from the schedule in Part J of the FDR.

These regulatory amendments would come into force on the day of registration in the Canada Gazette, Part II.

The publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, initiates a 30-day comment period. Anyone interested in this process or having comments on this notice may contact Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, Controlled Substances Directorate, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, by mail at Address Locator: 0302A, 150 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, or by email at ocs_regulatorypolicy-bsc_politiquereglementaire@hc-sc.gc.ca.

Michelle Boudreau

Director General
Controlled Substances Directorate

August 26, 2017

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Trois-Rivières Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

By the Minister of Transport

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Trois-Rivières Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective May 1, 1999;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the immovables, other than federal immovables, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to acquire the immovable known and designated as being lot 1 019 106 of the cadastre of Quebec;

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent to set out the said immovable in Schedule C of the letters patent;

WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendment to the letters patent is consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

1. Schedule C of the letters patent is amended by adding the following at the end of that Schedule:

 

Lot

Description

 

1 019 106

An immovable known and designated as being lot 1 019 106 of the cadastre of Quebec, registration division of Trois-Rivières, city of Trois-Rivières, as described in the certificate of location prepared May 16, 2017, and shown on the accompanying plan, under number 4012 of the minutes of Michel Plante, land surveyor, containing an area of 251.4 m2.

2. These supplementary letters patent take effect, for the lot mentioned above, on the date of registration in the Land Register of Quebec of the deed of sale evidencing the transfer of the immovable to the Authority.

ISSUED this 1st day of August, 2017.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

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GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Notice of intent to conduct an environmental assessment of the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement

On August 16, 2017, the modernization process of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with the United States and Mexico was officially launched, with the first negotiating round being held in Washington, D.C., from August 16 to 20, 2017. At the same time, the Government of Canada is conducting an environmental assessment (EA) to provide information to Canadian negotiators on the potential impacts of the Agreement on the environment. All interested parties are invited to provide comments on any likely and significant environmental impacts that this Agreement and its modernization process may have on Canada.

The Government of Canada is committed to sustainable development. Mutually supportive trade and environmental policies can contribute to this objective. To this end, the Minister of Foreign Affairs has directed trade officials to seek information and otherwise improve their understanding of the relationship between trade and environmental issues at the earliest stages of decision making, and to do this through an open and inclusive process. Environmental assessments of trade negotiations are critical to this work.

Environmental assessments of trade negotiations are prepared pursuant to the 2010 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (https://www.canada.ca/en/environmental-assessment-agency/programs/strategic-environmental-assessment/cabinet-directive-environmental-assessment-policy-plan-program-proposals.html).

All interested parties are invited to submit their comments on the environmental assessment of the modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) by Wednesday, October 25, 2017.

Contributions can be sent by email, fax or mail to the following:

Email: EAconsultationsEE@international.gc.ca

Mail: Consultations on the environmental
assessment of the modernization of the
North American Free Trade Agreement
(NAFTA)
Trade Negotiations — North America
Division (TNP)
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 1J1

Related links

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INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-005-17 — Proposed Revisions to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations (2017 edition)

This notice invites comments on proposals for the revision of the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations (the Canadian Table), as outlined in the consultation paper entitled the following:

  • Proposed Revisions to the Canadian Table of Frequency Allocations (2017 edition)

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) adopts the International Table of Frequency Allocations (the International Table) as part of the ITU Radio Regulations. This International Table allocates radio frequency spectrum to various combinations of radio services and is revised on a periodic basis, along with other parts of the ITU Radio Regulations.

The Canadian Table is derived from the International Table adopted by the ITU. The Canadian Table identifies those radio services required to meet Canadian needs and specifies, by Canadian footnote, any additional provisions for use of those services in Canada. Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) revises the Canadian Table on a periodic basis, normally following an ITU World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC). WRC-15, which was held from November 2 to November 27, 2015, adopted a number of changes to the frequency allocations in the International Table. WRC-15 dealt with issues concerning fixed, amateur, mobile, radiolocation, navigation, science, mobile-satellite and fixed-satellite services. The resulting changes to the International Table require the consideration of several domestic issues related to frequency allocation. The abovementioned consultation paper presents these issues and proposals for revisions to the Canadian Table. In addition, domestic requirements for other changes to the Canadian Table have emerged, and will also be addressed. This document discusses these issues and makes proposals for revisions to the Canadian Table.

Submitting comments

Interested parties are requested to submit their comments electronically (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) within 60 days of the date of publication of this notice using the following email address: ic.spectrumengineering-genieduspectre.ic@canada.ca. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments received will be posted on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SMSE-005-17).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

August 17, 2017

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

September 29, 2017

Chairperson

Canada Mortgage
and Housing Corporation

September 11, 2017

Chairperson

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

September 5, 2017

Directors

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

September 5, 2017

President

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

September 5, 2017

Member

Copyright Board

September 13, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Copyright Board

September 13, 2017

Chairperson

National Battlefields Commission

September 12, 2017

Commissioners

National Battlefields Commission

September 12, 2017

Chairperson

National Farm Products Council

August 31, 2017

Member

National Farm Products Council

August 31, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

National Museum of Science and Technology

September 25, 2017

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest
and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the
Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

September 15, 2017

Administrator

Ship-source Oil Pollution Fund and Fund for Railway Accidents Involving Designated Goods

September 23, 2017

Deputy Administrator

Ship-source Oil Pollution Fund and Fund for Railway Accidents Involving Designated Goods

September 23, 2017

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

September 5, 2017

Directors

Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority

August 30, 2017

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Members

Veterans Review
and Appeal
Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Director

Canada Post Corporation

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint
Commission

Chief Executive Officer

Invest in Canada Agency

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

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BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at July 31, 2017

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

14.9

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

7,487.6

 

Advances to members of Payments Canada

16.0

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

15.7

 
   

7,519.3

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

21,328.2

 

Government of Canada bonds

82,855.5

 

Other investments

393.2

 
   

104,576.9

Property and equipment

 

564.7

Intangible assets

 

39.3

Other assets

 

102.1

 

112,817.2


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

82,117.9

Deposits

Government of Canada

26,724.2

 

Members of Payments Canada

516.3

 

Other deposits

2,358.0

 
   

29,598.5

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

615.6

   

112,332.0

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

355.2

 
   

485.2

112,817.2

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, August 15, 2017

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, August 15, 2017

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

  • Footnote 1
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 2
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.