Vol. 151, No. 39 — September 30, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19330

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance iron(1+), chloro[dimethyl 9,9-dihydroxy-3-methyl-2,4-di(2-pyridinyl-κN)-7-[(2-pyridinyl-κN)methyl]-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-1,5-dicarboxylate-κN3, κN7]-, chloride (1:1), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 478945-46-9;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions of the following annex.

George Enei
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“notifier” means the person who has, on September 7, 2017, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

“paint” and “coating” means a product, either in liquid or aerosol form, that is intended for use as a waterborne solvent system, an alcohol-based, oil-based or solvent-based coating, and includes interior and exterior paint, wood stain, primer, varnish, and lacquer, whether tinted or untinted;

“solvent system” means any liquid diluent added to a paint or coating during the formulation process for the purpose of adjusting the viscosity of the formulation; and

“substance” means iron(1+), chloro[dimethyl 9,9-dihydroxy-3-methyl-2,4-di(2-pyridinyl-κN)-7-[(2-pyridinyl-κN)methyl]-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane-1,5-dicarboxylate-κN3, κN7]-, chloride (1:1), Chemical Abstracts Service No. 478945-46-9.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. (1) Subject to subsection (2), the substance shall only be used to manufacture a paint or a coating and the following conditions must be met:

  • (a) the paint or coating is intended to be applied and cured in an industrial facility; or
  • (b) the paint or coating is not intended to be applied and cured in an industrial facility, but the following conditions are met:
    • (i) the concentration of the substance in the paint or coating is less than or equal to 100 parts per million (ppm),
    • (ii) the paint or coating is manufactured with a waterborne solvent system or an alcohol-based solvent system (e.g. propylene glycol, ethylene glycol), and
    • (iii) the paint or coating is not intended for use by children under the age of 18.

(2) The substance in a paint or coating may be applied on other products if the paint or coating is applied and cured in an industrial facility.

4. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to a person who will use it in accordance with item 3.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning manufacturing the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

  • (a) the information specified in paragraph 7(a) of Schedule 4 to the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers);
  • (b) the address of the manufacturing facility within Canada;
  • (c) the information specified in paragraphs 8(a) to (e), item 9 and paragraph 10(b) of Schedule 5 to those Regulations; and
  • (d) the following information related to the manufacturing of the substance in Canada:
    • (i) a brief description of the manufacturing process that details the precursors of the substance, the reaction stoichiometry and the nature (batch or continuous) and scale of the process,
    • (ii) a flow diagram of the manufacturing process that includes features such as process tanks, holding tanks and distillation towers, and
    • (iii) a brief description of the major steps in manufacturing operations, the chemical conversions, the points of entry of all feedstock and the points of release of the substance, and the processes to eliminate environmental release.

Record-keeping requirements

6. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

  • (a) the use of the substance;
  • (b) the quantity of the substance that the notifier manufactures, imports, purchases, sells and uses;
  • (c) the name and address of each person to whom the notifier transfers the physical possession or control of the substance; and
  • (d) the concentration of the substance in the paint or coating manufactured with the substance.

(2) The notifier shall the maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

7. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

8. The present ministerial conditions come into force on September 15, 2017.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for living organisms (subsection 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 106(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use, manufacture or import for a significant new activity a living organism that is on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 106(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use for a significant new activity a living organism that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 106(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsection 106(1), (3) or (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived;

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 106(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

  • (a) in the opinion of the ministers, the information is not needed in order to determine whether the living organism is toxic or capable of becoming toxic;
  • (b) the living organism is to be used for a prescribed purpose or manufactured at a location where, in the opinion of the ministers, the person requesting the waiver is able to contain the living organism so as to satisfactorily protect the environment and human health; or
  • (c) it is not, in the opinion of the ministers, practicable or feasible to obtain the test data necessary to generate the information;

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waived some requirements to provide information in accordance with the following annex pursuant to subsection 106(8) of that Act.

Julie Thompson
Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement Division

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of information requirements

(Subsection 106(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver
was granted

Information concerning a living organism in relation to which a waiver was granted

AstraZeneca Canada Inc.

Data from tests of antibiotic susceptibility

Data from a test to determine the effects on aquatic plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate species

Data from a test to determine the effects on terrestrial plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate species

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The decision to grant a waiver is made on a case-by-case basis by Environment Canada in consultation with Health Canada. On average, approximately 100 waivers are granted yearly for chemicals and polymers and living organisms for an average of 500 notifications received.

For more information, please see the waivers website on the New Substances website: http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=7F19FF4B-1.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Waiver of information requirements for substances (subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas any person who proposes to import or manufacture a substance that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use, manufacture or import for a significant new activity a substance that is on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas any person who proposes to use for a significant new activity a substance that is not on the Domestic Substances List must provide to the Minister of the Environment the information required under subsection 81(4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a person may, pursuant to subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, request any of the requirements to provide information under subsection 81(1), (3) or (4) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 to be waived; and

Whereas a waiver may be granted by the Minister of the Environment under subsection 81(8) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 if

  • (a) in the opinion of the Ministers, the information is not needed in order to determine whether the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic;
  • (b) the substance is to be used for a prescribed purpose or manufactured at a location where, in the opinion of the Ministers, the person requesting the waiver is able to contain the substance so as to satisfactorily protect the environment and human health; or
  • (c) it is not, in the opinion of the Ministers, practicable or feasible to obtain the test data necessary to generate the information,

Therefore, notice is hereby given, pursuant to subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that the Minister of the Environment waived some requirements to provide information in accordance with the following annex pursuant to subsection 81(8) of that Act.

Julie Thompson
Executive Director
Program Development and Engagement Division

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Waiver of information requirements

(Subsection 81(9) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Person to whom a waiver was granted

Information concerning a substance in relation to which a waiver was granted

BASF

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Chevron Oronite Company LLC

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Clariant (Canada) Inc.

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH (2) (see footnote 1)

Data from an in vitro test for chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells (2) (see footnote 2)

Epson Canada Ltd.

Data in respect of vapour pressure

GE Betz Inc.

Data in respect of vapour pressure

Data in respect of water solubility

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Data in respect of
adsorption-desorption screening test

Data from a 28-day
repeated-dose mammalian toxicity test

ICL-IP America Inc.

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

Lubrizol Canada Ltd.

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Data from an in vivo mammalian mutagenicity test

The Chemours Canada Company

Data in respect of hydrolysis rate as a function of pH

Data from an acute mammalian toxicity test (oral, dermal or inhalation)

Data from a skin irritation test

Data from a skin sensitization test

EXPLANATORY NOTE

The decision to grant a waiver is made on a case-by-case basis by Environment Canada in consultation with Health Canada. On average, approximately 100 waivers are granted yearly for chemicals and polymers and living organisms for an average of 500 notifications received.

For more information, please see the waivers web page on the New Substances website: http://www.ec.gc.ca/subsnouvelles-newsubs/default.asp?lang=En&n=7F19FF4B-1.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two stilbenes — benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[[4-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-6-(phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-, disodium salt (C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt), CAS RN (see footnote 3) 4193-55-9, and benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[[4-(4-morpholinyl)-6-(phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-, disodium salt (Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1), CAS RN 16090-02-1 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(1) or paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 pursuant to section 74 of the Act and on C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of two of the four substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Stilbenes Group. These two substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. The other two substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and proposed decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. (see footnote 4) Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the two substances listed in the table below.

Substances in the Stilbenes Group

CAS RN (see footnote 5)

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

4193-55-9 (see footnote a)

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[[4-[bis(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]-6-(phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-, disodium salt

C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt

16090-02-1

Benzenesulfonic acid, 2,2′-(1,2-ethenediyl)bis[5-[[4-(4-morpholinyl)-6-(phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-, disodium salt

Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1

Abbreviations: C.I., Colour Index; FWA, fluorescent whitening agent

According to information submitted under section 71 of CEPA, C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt was imported in quantities between 10 000 and 100 000 kg and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 was imported at a quantity of 42 344 kg in 2011. These substances are intended to be used as dyes and bleaching agents in laundry detergents and dishwashing products. Consumer uses in Canada are limited to uses as optical brighteners in liquid laundry detergents for C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and in powdered laundry detergents for Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1.

The ecological risks of C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1. It is proposed to conclude that C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) determined that C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 did not elicit effects of concern for human health and concluded that these substances have a “low hazard profile.” There were no findings of carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, or repeated-dose toxicity for the two substances considered in this assessment. Furthermore, the OECD indicated that these substances are not expected to have reproductive or developmental effects based on studies conducted with structurally similar chemicals. Considering the low hazard nature of these substances, risk to human health is considered to be low.

Based on the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that C.I Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 28, disodium salt and Fluorescent Brightener FWA-1 do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of two substances — phenol, 2-methyoxy-4-(2-propenyl)-, CAS RN (see footnote 6) 97-53-0 (eugenol), and rose, Rosa canina, ext., CAS RN 84696-47-9 (Rosa canina extract) — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas eugenol is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on eugenol pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and Rosa canina extract pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action at this time under section 77 of the Act for eugenol.

Notice is further given that the ministers propose to take no further action on Rosa canina extract at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of eugenol and rose, Rosa canina, ext.

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on two of four substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Eugenol and Isoeugenol Derivatives Group. Eugenol was identified as a priority for assessment, as it met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Rose, Rosa canina, ext. (this substance will be referred to as Rosa canina extract in this draft screening assessment) was considered a priority on the basis of other ecological concerns. Two of the four substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. (see footnote 7) Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the two substances listed in the table below.

Substances

CAS RN(see footnote 8)

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

97-53-0

Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(2-propenyl)-

Eugenol

84696-47-9(see footnote b) (see footnote c)

Rose, Rosa canina, ext.

Rosa canina extract

Eugenol is a naturally occurring substance. It is a major component of the bud, leaf and stem of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and is also reported as a constituent in other volatile oils (e.g. laurel and cinnamon leaf oils). According to information submitted pursuant to surveys conducted under section 71 of CEPA, between 100 and 1 000 kg of eugenol was manufactured in Canada and between 100 and 1 000 kg was imported into Canada in 2011. Eugenol is used as an odour agent or fragrance ingredient in a range of products including personal care products, cleaning products and air care products. Eugenol and clove oil (a source of exposure to eugenol) are ingredients in cosmetic and natural health products. Eugenol is naturally occurring in food, and eugenol and clove oils (bud, leaf and stem) are used as food flavouring agents.

Rosa canina extract is obtained from the Rosa canina plant, a wild rose species widely distributed in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North America. In 2011, no Canadian manufacturing activities were reported for Rosa canina extract above the reporting threshold of 100 kg; 1 200 kg of Rosa canina extract was imported into Canada. Rosa canina extract is used in a wide variety of cosmetic and natural health products in Canada, with medicinal and non-medicinal roles.

The ecological risks of eugenol and Rosa canina extract were characterized using the ecological risk characterization (ERC) of organic substances approach. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity are established. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified eugenol and Rosa canina extract as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from eugenol and Rosa canina extract. It is proposed to conclude that eugenol and Rosa canina extract do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

With respect to human health, exposure of the general population to eugenol in Canada may occur through the use of a range of products including cosmetics, natural health products, air fresheners and cleaning products (as a fragrance ingredient). Eugenol is also naturally present in food, which is expected to be the predominant source of dietary exposure, and is also used as a food flavouring agent. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified eugenol as a Group 3 carcinogen (not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans) based on limited evidence of carcinogenicity in laboratory studies. Available information indicates that eugenol is not likely to be genotoxic. The only health effect associated with repeated exposure to eugenol in laboratory studies is a decrease in body weight gain, observed only at high doses, with no associated adverse effects. Accordingly, this substance is considered to be of low hazard potential. Given the low hazard potential of this substance, the risk for human health is considered to be low.

Exposure of the general population in Canada to Rosa canina extract may occur primarily through use of cosmetics and natural health products by the oral and dermal routes. Based on composition information, eugenol and 2-phenethyl alcohol (CAS RN 60-12-8) were identified as primary constituents of Rosa canina flower extract. On the basis of a comparison of estimates of exposure to 2-phenethyl alcohol and levels of 2-phenethyl alcohol associated with adverse effects in laboratory studies, margins of exposure are considered adequate to address uncertainty in health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that eugenol and Rosa canina extract do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that eugenol and Rosa canina extract do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a fingerprint examiner:

  • Garrett Dueck

Ottawa, September 14, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Ontario Provincial Police as a fingerprint examiner:

  • John C. Norman

Ottawa, September 14, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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GLOBAL AFFAIRS CANADA

Consultations on Canada’s discussions with the remaining members of what was previously the Trans-Pacific Partnership

The Government of Canada is committed to fostering and strengthening its economic relationship with Asia-Pacific nations, including with the remaining members of what was the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) [Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam].

The Government of Canada is seeking the views of the Canadian public and interested Canadian stakeholders on a potential agreement with the remaining countries. The Government of Canada’s approach is one that puts the interests of Canadians and opportunities for the middle class, women, youth and Indigenous people front and centre. Given recent developments, this is an opportunity to re-evaluate what new opportunities may exist for Canadians, particularly small and medium-sized businesses, going forward and for Canada to set the terms of trade in the region.

Background

Canada’s commercial relations with the remaining nations

The Trans-Pacific Partnership was an initiative originally concluded on October 5, 2015, by 12 Asia-Pacific countries (Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States, and Vietnam) and signed on February 4, 2016, by all members. On January 30, 2017, the United States notified signatories that it did not intend to become a party to the Agreement. Following this decision, the remaining TPP signatories have expressed interest in identifying the best way in which an optimized agreement can move forward.

The remaining countries are commercially significant for Canadian exporters and investors. Total merchandise trade among these countries reached US$404 billion in 2015. Together, the 11 countries, including Canada, represent 494 million people, with a combined GDP of US$10.2 trillion, or 13.6% of global GDP.

Discussions regarding a potential pathway forward towards a renewed and optimized agreement offer Canada the opportunity to strengthen links with Asia-Pacific partners, as well as provide economic and strategic benefits to Canada through significant preferential market access to the fast-growing markets of the Asia-Pacific region.

This consultation seeks the views of interested Canadians on interests or issues of importance to them regarding trade and investment with these important countries, particularly Japan.

All interested parties are invited to submit their views by October 30, 2017. Please be advised that any information received as a result of this consultation will be considered public information, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Submissions should include the following:

  1. the contributor’s name and address and, if applicable, the name of the contributor’s organization, institution or business;
  2. the specific issues being addressed; and
  3. where possible, precise information on the rationale for the positions taken, including any significant impact they may have on Canada’s domestic or international interests.

Submissions by interested parties

The Government of Canada would appreciate receiving views from Canadians regarding trade and investment interests with these countries, as well as issues that relate to other Canadian interests and values (e.g. corporate social responsibility, trade and gender).

Contributions can be sent by email or mail to

Email:  TPP-PTP.Consultations@international.gc.ca

Address: Canada–Pacific Trade Consultations
Global Affairs Canada
Trade Negotiations Division (TCA)
Lester B. Pearson Building
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0G2

[39-1-o]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

ASSESSMENT OF PENSION PLANS REGULATIONS

Basic rate

Notice is hereby given, in accordance with section 5 of the Assessment of Pension Plans Regulations, that the Superintendent of Financial Institutions sets the basic rate, established pursuant to section 4 of the said Regulations, at $8.00 for the Office year beginning on April 1, 2018. In accordance with subsection 2(2) of the said Regulations, this rate applies to all pension plans registered under the Pension Benefits Standards Act, 1985 and the Pooled Registered Pension Plans Act, where the assessment is due by March 31, 2019.

September 20, 2017

Carolyn Rogers
Assistant Superintendent

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chairperson

Business Development Bank of Canada

October 23, 2017

Chairperson of the Board of Directors

Canada Post Corporation

October 16, 2017

Members of the Board of Directors

Canada Post Corporation

November 17, 2017

Vice-Chairperson (Telecommunications)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

October 18, 2017

Members

Copyright Board

October 2, 2017

Vice-Chair

Copyright Board

October 2, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Invest in Canada Hub

October 11, 2017

Directors

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mint

October 18, 2017

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

October 23, 2017

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

December 31, 2017

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

[39-1-o]

TREASURY BOARD SECRETARIAT

Notice to interested parties — Consultation on the draft Cabinet Directive on Regulation

The Government of Canada is consulting with Canadians to seek their views on how we can effectively update our federal regulatory policy. We are updating the Cabinet Directive on Regulatory Management, our existing regulatory policy that came into effect in October 2012. The draft of the updated policy, the Cabinet Directive on Regulation (CDR), is available at http://open.canada.ca/en/public-consultation-draft-cabinet-directive-regulation]. The update is being done to reflect the Government of Canada’s priorities to

  • Give emphasis to the regulatory life-cycle approach: development, management and review;
  • Incorporate regulatory cooperation and stakeholder engagement throughout the regulatory life cycle;
  • Strengthen other analytical requirements: consultations with Indigenous peoples, environmental impacts and Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+); and
  • Require that regulations be assessed periodically for relevance.

The Regulatory Affairs Sector of the Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada is launching an online consultation to seek feedback on updates to the draft CDR. The consultation will be posted on open.canada.ca from September 30 to October 29, 2017. We invite interested Canadians to provide comments based on their experience and familiarity with the federal regulatory development process. The feedback received from this consultation will be used to help further improve the draft CDR.

More information on the draft CDR can be found on the Consulting with Canadians website. (see footnote 9)

Contact information

Alan Neeff
Director of Regulatory Policy
Regulatory Affairs Sector
Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat
Email: CDRM-DCGR@tbs-sct.gc.ca

[39-1-o]

BANK OF CANADA

Statement of financial position as at August 31, 2017

(Millions of dollars) Unaudited

ASSETS

Cash and foreign deposits

 

16.3

Loans and receivables

Securities purchased under resale agreements

7,002.3

 

Advances to members of Payments Canada

 

Advances to governments

 

Other receivables

9.1

 
   

7,011.4

Investments

Treasury bills of Canada

21,253.5

 

Government of Canada bonds

80,777.7

 

Other investments

397.8

 
   

102,429.0

Property and equipment

 

564.4

Intangible assets

 

39.5

Other assets

 

101.0

 

110,161.6


LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Bank notes in circulation

 

82,640.0

Deposits

Government of Canada

23,612.8

 

Members of Payments Canada

469.1

 

Other deposits

2,326.4

 
   

26,408.3

Securities sold under repurchase agreements

 

Other liabilities

 

623.5

   

109,671.8

Equity

Share capital

5.0

 

Statutory and special reserves

125.0

 

Available-for-sale reserve

359.8

 
   

489.8

110,161.6

I declare that the foregoing return is correct according to the books of the Bank.

Ottawa, September 18, 2017

Carmen Vierula
Chief Financial Officer and Chief Accountant

I declare that the foregoing return is to the best of my knowledge and belief correct, and shows truly and clearly the financial position of the Bank, as required by section 29 of the Bank of Canada Act.

Ottawa, September 18, 2017

Stephen S. Poloz
Governor

  • Footnote 1
    The number in brackets indicates the number of times that the information requirement in the second column was waived for the company.
  • Footnote 2
    The number in brackets indicates the number of times that the information requirement in the second column was waived for the company.
  • Footnote 3
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 4
    Proposed conclusions for CAS RNs 1533-45-5 and 3426-43-5 are provided in the draft screening assessment titled Rapid Screening of Substances with Limited General Population Exposure.
  • Footnote 5
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 6
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 7
    Conclusions for CAS RNs 120-11-6 and 120-24-1 are provided in the draft screening assessment titled Substances Identified as Being of Low Concern based on the Ecological Risk Classification of Organic Substances and the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC)-based Approach for Certain Substances.
  • Footnote 8
    The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.
  • Footnote 9
    http://www1.canada.ca/consultingcanadians/
  • Footnote a
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.
  • Footnote b
    This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this assessment, as it was considered a priority on the basis of other concerns.
  • Footnote c
    This CAS RN is a UVCB (Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, or Biological materials).