Vol. 151, No. 42 — October 21, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

Notice requesting comments on a proposal to amend the Canadian Passport Order

Notice is hereby given that the Department is seeking written comments from all interested parties on a proposal to amend the Canadian Passport Order (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SI-81-86/FullText.html) to strengthen existing refusal and revocation authorities, and to enhance the protection of children.

Background

The Canadian Passport Order (the Order) governs the issuance, refusal, cancellation and revocation of Canadian passports.

The Government of Canada is committed to protecting children and to maintaining the integrity of the Canadian passport by ensuring that only those entitled to a passport receive one. In support of this commitment, the Department is proposing to amend the Order to respond to concerns raised by the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights on the Order’s ability to protect children, and to address identified integrity gaps.

Strengthening the Order’s existing refusal and revocation authorities

The Department is proposing to amend the Order to strengthen the Minister’s refusal and revocation authorities in the following areas:

  1. Enhance and clarify the Minister’s authority to refuse or revoke a passport when an individual misuses a passport issued to another person (for example when a parent allows someone else to use the passport issued to their child).
  2. Clarify the Minister’s authority to refuse or revoke a passport when a person is charged with a hybrid offence. Currently, the Order provides the authority to refuse or revoke a passport when a person is charged with an indictable offence. An amendment is being sought to include hybrid offences, even if they are prosecuted summarily. Many offences relating to passport issuance are hybrid offences (for example forgery, false statement on a passport application, identity fraud, identity theft and removal of a child from Canada).
Enhancing the protection of children

The Department is proposing to amend the Order to enhance the protection of children. In 2015, the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights issued a report on Challenges and International Mechanisms to Address Cross-Border Child Abduction, (see footnote 1) which raised concerns that the Order does not do enough to protect children. The Department is proposing to enhance the protection of children by providing the Minister with the authority to issue a passport to a child without a parent or guardian having applied, as well as to refuse, revoke or cancel a passport issued to a child when it is in the best interests of the child. The Department will work with government and non-governmental partners both in Canada and abroad, and will consider the child’s physical, mental, cultural, and emotional safety and well-being when assessing the best interest of the child.

Comments

The public is invited to provide comments and input into the proposed amendments described above. Anyone may, within 15 days of the publication of this notice, provide their comments on this Notice of Intent, in writing, by email at IRCC.Order-Decret.IRCC@cic.gc.ca or by fax at 613-952-9187.

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DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Ministerial Instructions Amending the Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Express Entry System, 2017-2

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 10.3 (see footnote a) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (see footnote b), gives the annexed Ministerial Instructions Amending the Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Express Entry System, 2017-2.

Ottawa, October 17, 2017

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Ministerial Instructions Amending the Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Express Entry System, 2017-2

Amendments

1 Subsection 3(4) of the French version of the Ministerial Instructions Respecting the Express Entry System (see footnote 2) is replaced by the following:

Résultats périmés

(4) Si, durant la période où une déclaration d’intérêt est conservée dans le bassin du système Entrée express, les résultats d’un test d’évaluation linguistique fournis pour cette déclaration en application de l’alinéa (3)a) datent de deux ans ou plus ou si les résultats de l’évaluation d’équivalence fournis pour cette déclaration en application de l’alinéa (3)b) datent de cinq ans ou plus, l’étranger est réputé, pour l’application du paragraphe 5‍(1), ne plus être capable de satisfaire aux exigences prévues par le Règlement relativement à ces résultats.

2 Section 7 of the Instructions is replaced by the following:

Disclosure to province

7 The Minister may, for the purpose of section 10.4 of the Act, disclose to officials responsible for the administration of the provincial nominee program of a province referred to in paragraph 2(d) the following personal information in respect of a foreign national:

3 The portion of subsection 13(1) of the French version of the Instructions before paragraph (a) is replaced by the following:

Compétences linguistiques — première langue officielle

13 (1) Le nombre de points attribués pour la compétence linguistique dans la première langue officielle de l’étranger, dans chacune des habiletés langagières évaluées conformément aux normes prévues dans les Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens et dans le Canadian Language Benchmarks est de :

4 Paragraph 27(a) of the French version of the Instructions is replaced by the following:

5 Paragraph 29(1)(a) of the Instructions is replaced by the following:

Coming into Force

6 These Instructions come into force on October 24, 2017.

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DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT
EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE REGULATIONS

Resolution

Pursuant to section 66.5 of the Employment Insurance Act, notice is hereby given that the employment insurance premium rate for the year 2018 is $1.66 per $100 of insurable earnings.

Pursuant to sections 76.07 and 76.35 of the Employment Insurance Regulations, notice is hereby given that the employment insurance premium reduction rate for the year 2018 for residents of Quebec covered under the Quebec Parental Insurance Plan is $0.36. Therefore, the employment insurance premium rate for residents of Quebec is $1.30 per $100 of insurable earnings.

Louise Levonian
Chairperson
Canada Employment Insurance Commission

Judith Andrew
Commissioner for Employers
Canada Employment Insurance Commission

Pierre Laliberté
Commissioner for Workers
Canada Employment Insurance Commission

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Chief Review Officer

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 244(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, (see footnote 3) has appointed Mr. Jerry DeMarco as the Chief Review Officer to perform the functions of the Chief Review Officer as and when required.

Ottawa, September 1, 2017

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19233

Ministerial condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information pertaining to the substance fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with bisphenol A, epichlorohydrin, glycidyl tolyl ether and triethylenetetramine, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 186321-96-0;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999,

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions set out in the following annex.

George Enei
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

“engineered hazardous waste landfill facility” means a facility that is part of an overall integrated hazardous waste management system where wastes that do not require additional treatment or processing are sent and where hazardous materials are confined or controlled for the duration of their effective contaminating lifespan;

“manufactured item” means an item that is formed into a specific physical shape or design during manufacture and has, for its final use, a function or functions dependent in whole or in part on its shape or design;

“notifier” means the person who has, on June 14, 2017, provided to the Minister of the Environment the prescribed information concerning the substance, in accordance with subsection 81(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

“substance” means fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with bisphenol A, epichlorohydrin, glycidyl tolyl ether and triethylenetetramine, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 186321-96-0;

“waste” means the effluents that result from formulation or transportation of the substance, disposable vessels used for the substance, spillage that contains the substance, the process effluents that contain the substance and any residual quantity of the substance in any equipment or vessel.

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The substance shall not be imported in a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies that is not a manufactured item.

4. The substance shall not be used to manufacture a consumer product to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act applies, where the substance is present in the consumer product.

5. At least 120 days prior to beginning the manufacture of the substance in Canada, the notifier shall inform the Minister of the Environment, in writing, and provide the following information:

Handling and disposal of the substance

6. The notifier or the person to whom the substance has been transferred must collect the wastes in their physical possession or under their control and destroy or dispose of it in the following manner:

Environmental release

7. Where any release of the substance or waste to the environment occurs, the person who has the physical possession or control of the substance or waste shall immediately take all measures necessary to prevent any further release, and to limit the dispersion of any release. Furthermore, the person shall, as soon as possible in the circumstances, inform the Minister of the Environment by contacting an enforcement officer designated under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

Record-keeping requirements

8. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain the electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

9. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance or of the waste, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance or waste, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

Coming into force

10. These ministerial conditions come into force on October 10, 2017.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Roster of review officers

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to section 243 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, (see footnote 4)hereby appoints Ms. Pamela Large-Moran to the roster of review officers, to hold office during good behaviour for a term of three years, effective September 1, 2017.

Ottawa, September 1, 2017

The Honourable Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P.
Minister of the Environment

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of the final decision after screening assessment of four substances — three alkyl sulfates and α-olefin sulfonate — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the four substances identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act);

Whereas a summary of the final screening assessment conducted on these substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the final screening assessment of the Alkyl Sulfates and α-Olefin Sulfonate Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of four substances referred to collectively as the Alkyl Sulfates and α-Olefin Sulfonate Group. The substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RN (see footnote 5)), their Domestic Substances List names and their common names are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Alkyl Sulfates and α-Olefin Sulfonate Group

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

139-96-8

Sulfuric acid, monododecyl ester, compound with 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris[ethanol] (1:1)

Triethanolamine (TEA) lauryl sulfate

151-21-3

Sulfuric acid monododecyl ester sodium salt

Sodium lauryl sulfate

2235-54-3

Sulfuric acid, monododecyl ester, ammonium salt

Ammonium lauryl sulfate

68439-57-6 (see footnote c)

Sulfonic acids, C14-16-alkane hydroxy and C14-16-alkene, sodium salts

Sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate

All four substances in this group are anionic surfactants and do not occur naturally in the environment. They are primarily found in cleaning products (e.g. laundry, dishwashing, and household products) and in other products available to consumers (e.g. shampoos, toothpastes, soaps, and bubble bath products). Sodium lauryl sulfate can also be found in food packaging materials and is an approved food additive with a limited number of permitted uses in a small number of food categories. In 2011, all substances, with the exception of TEA lauryl sulfate, were manufactured in Canada in quantities ranging from 100 to 1 000 000 kg. In the same year, all four substances were imported into Canada in quantities ranging from 10 000 to 2 240 000 kg.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Alkyl Sulfates and α-Olefin Sulfonate Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances. The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the four substances in this assessment as having low-to-moderate potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate. It is concluded that TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Exposure to the substances from drinking water and from the use of cleaning products and cosmetics was estimated for the general population of Canada. In addition, exposure to sodium lauryl sulfate was estimated based on its presence as a non-medicinal ingredient in natural health products, non-prescription drugs formulated as capsules/tablets and toothpastes.

TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, and ammonium lauryl sulfate were grouped together on the basis of structural similarity and a read-across approach was used to characterize their health effects. Sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate was addressed separately. The liver is the target organ for systemic toxicity for alkyl sulfates with certain chain lengths following oral administration. Liver effects, however, were not observed for sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate. Developmental effects were observed for sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate in some laboratory studies, but not in others.

The margins of exposure comparing critical effect levels and levels to which the general population may be exposed were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate.

Based on the adequacy of the margins between critical effect levels and estimated exposure and on information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that TEA lauryl sulfate, sodium lauryl sulfate, ammonium lauryl sulfate and sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The final screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

Notice of intent to consult on Health Canada’s Fee Proposal for Drugs and Medical Devices

In October 2017, Health Canada will launch a public consultation on amendments to its fees for human drugs, veterinary drugs, and medical devices, for the following three fee lines:

The purpose of the amendments is for Health Canada to modernize its fees and continue to deliver reliable regulatory activities.

Health Canada’s Fee Proposal for Drugs and Medical Devices (Fee Proposal) is the consultation document that stakeholders and the public are invited to review; it includes revised fee amounts and performance standards.

Consultation

Please visit the Fee Proposal consultation lead page (https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/programs/consultation-fee-proposal-drugs-medical-devices.html)for details on how to participate in the consultation. The Fee Proposal will be posted for a period of 75 days, closing on January 4, 2018. The objective of the consultation is to obtain feedback on proposed amendments to the fees. Health Canada will continue to engage with its stakeholders throughout the consultation.

The Department is committed to respecting the privacy of consultation participants. All personal information created, held or collected by the Department is protected by the Privacy Act.

Any inquiries about the consultation can be directed to CRI_IRC_Consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca.

Results

Feedback will be collated and summarized into a What We Heard Report and published on the Health Canada website. Health Canada will publish the new fee regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2019.

Any inquiries or comments can be directed to Etienne Ouimette, Acting Director General, Resource Management Operations Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, 613-957-6690 (telephone), CRI_IRC_consultations@hc-sc.gc.ca (email).

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS PRODUCTS ACT
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Notice of intent for possible amendments to the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act and the Hazardous Products Act

Notice is hereby given that Health Canada is seeking written comments from all interested parties on questions relating to possible amendments to the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA) and the exclusion for consumer products under the Hazardous Products Act (HPA).

Background

The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), Canada’s national hazard communication standard, came into effect on October 31, 1988. The key elements of the system are hazard classification, cautionary labelling of hazardous products, the provision of safety data sheets, and worker education and training programs. WHMIS is implemented through interlocking federal, provincial and territorial legislation. At the federal level, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) and the Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR) require suppliers who sell or import hazardous products intended for use, handling or storage in Canadian workplaces to provide related hazard information through labels and safety data sheets (SDSs).

In the workplace, federal (through the Canada Labour Code), provincial and territorial (FPT) occupational safety and health (OSH) acts and regulations set out requirements for employers to inform and train employees with regard to how to safely handle, store and use hazardous chemicals in the workplace. In addition, under the federal Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA), suppliers regulated under the HPA can make claims for exemption from disclosure of certain information that they consider to be confidential business information (CBI). Employers regulated under FPT OSH legislation also have options to protect certain information that they consider to be CBI by using the mechanism set out under the HMIRA.

On February 11, 2015, the HPR came into force and the former Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) were repealed. This fulfilled a commitment under the Canada–United States Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) to implement the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals in Canada without reducing the level of safety or protection for workers. This modified WHMIS is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

Recent conversations with stakeholders, including suppliers, employers and organized labour, have raised the following two issues related to the HPA and the HMIRA:

Description
1. Carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants and respiratory sensitizers

Currently, under subsection 11(1) of the HMIRA, a supplier who is required, either directly or indirectly, because of the provisions of the HPA, to disclose certain information, may file a claim for exemption from the requirement to disclose that information, if the supplier considers it to be CBI.

Information that is permitted to be the subject of a claim for exemption includes

Representatives of organized labour have expressed that substances or ingredients in a mixture that are CMRRs should not be permitted to be the subject of a CBI claim under the HMIRA. That is, for substances that are CMRRs, suppliers should not be allowed to claim the chemical name, CAS registry number and any unique identifiers, as CBI, and for ingredients in a mixture that are CMRRs, suppliers should not be allowed to claim the chemical name, CAS registry number or any other unique identifier, or the concentration of the ingredient, as CBI. They indicated (or are of the view) that CMRRs are particularly hazardous and pose risks to worker health and safety. They note that the European Union does not allow CBI protection for CMRRs and have requested that Health Canada adopt a similar approach whereby suppliers would not be allowed to submit a CBI claim in respect of a substance or ingredient that is a CMRR.

In order to implement this change, whereby suppliers would no longer be allowed to submit a CBI claim in respect of a substance or an ingredient in a mixture that is a CMRR, legislative amendments to the HMIRA would be required.

2. Consumer products

The HPA does not apply in respect of the sale or importation of certain categories of products, as specified in section 12 and Schedule 1 of the HPA. The excluded sectors are the following: consumer products, cosmetics, drugs, explosives, food, medical devices, pest control products, nuclear substances, hazardous waste, manufactured articles, tobacco and tobacco products, and wood and products made from wood. Therefore, HPA supplier hazard communication requirements (i.e. labelling and SDS requirements) do not apply to the sale or importation of these products, even when these products are intended to be used, handled or stored in Canadian workplaces. However, when excluded products are used in the workplace, FPT OHS regulations may require worker education and training in relation to these products.

The HPA exclusion for consumer products applies to “consumer products” as defined in section 2 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA): “consumer product means a product, including its components, parts or accessories, that may reasonably be expected to be obtained by an individual to be used for non-commercial purposes, including for domestic, recreational and sports purposes, and includes its packaging.” Consumer chemical products that are regulated by the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001 (CCCR 2001) are considered to be a consumer product, and are therefore required to meet all regulatory requirements, including a compliant label. However, the CCCR 2001 do not currently regulate for chronic health hazards such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, reproductive toxicity or respiratory sensitivity.

For example, consumer chemical products, such as brake cleaners or degreasing products that are packaged as consumer products and used by workers in the auto industry, are not subject to the hazard classification and communication (label and SDS) requirements of the HPA upon their sale or import in Canada. Workers using such products may not have the same hazard information that would be available to a worker handling the same products supplied directly to the workplace and not considered a consumer product. However, in practice, it is possible that some workplaces may require that WHMIS labelling and SDSs be provided for such products prior to use in the workplace.

Representatives of organized labour have requested that the HPA exclusion for consumer products be amended, so that workers using, handling or storing consumer products in workplace settings would be provided with HPA information regarding all the hazards of these products by their employers.

In order to make changes whereby suppliers who sell or import consumer products intended for use, handling or storage in a workplace in Canada would be subject to HPA requirements, amendments to the HPA would be required. However, these amendments can be undertaken through the regulatory process instead of the legislative process.

Comments

This notice of intent is an opportunity for the public to provide early comments and input into the proposal to amend the HMIRA and the HPA to address the issue of CBI for CMRRs and the provision of hazard information for consumer products. Some items to consider would be if changes regarding these two issues would have any effect, both positively or negatively, on trade, business requirements, training obligations, health and safety in the workplace, and ability to meet obligations as an employer or supplier.

Interested parties (including chemical manufacturers and distributors, employers, workers, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, interested groups, and the general public) may, until November 20, 2017, provide their comments on the issues identified herein, in writing, to the person named below at the address provided.

Questions and requests for additional information, as well as comments on this notice of intent, may be directed to Christine Lefebvre, Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, Consumer Product Safety Directorate, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9, 613-952-3317 (telephone), 613-952-2551 (fax), christine.lefebvre@canada.ca (email).

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Crossin, E. David, Q.C.

2017-1220

Supreme Court of British Columbia

 

Judge

 

Dietrich, Bernadette

2017-1222

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Mandziuk, Steven N., Q.C.

2017-1221

Court of the Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justice

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Member ex officio

 

Quach, The Hon. Aline U. K.

2017-1223

Superior Court for the district of Montréal, in and for the Province of Quebec

 

Puisne Judge

 

Rouleau, The Hon. Paul S.

2017-1234

Nunavut Court of Justice

 

Deputy Judge

 

October 13, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-006-17 — Consultation on the Spectrum Outlook 2018 to 2022

Intent

The intent of this notice is to announce a public consultation through the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) document entitled Consultation on the Spectrum Outlook 2018 to 2022. Through the release of this document, ISED is hereby initiating a consultation on the overall approach and planning activities related to the release of spectrum for commercial mobile services, licence-exempt applications, satellite services and wireless backhaul services over the years 2018 to 2022.

Submitting comments

To ensure consideration, parties should submit their comments no later than January 9, 2018. Respondents are asked to provide their comments in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) to the following email address: ic.spectrumauctions-encheresduspectre.ic@canada.ca. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments will be posted on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ised.gc.ca/spectrum. All comments will be reviewed and considered by ISED in order to arrive at its decisions regarding the above-mentioned proposals.

ISED will also provide interested parties with the opportunity to reply to comments from other parties. Reply comments will be accepted until February 8, 2018.

Written submissions should be addressed to the Director, Spectrum Regulatory Best Practices, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, 235 Queen Street, 6th Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H5.

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the notice reference number (SLPB-006-17).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ised.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

October 6, 2017

Chantal Davis
Acting Director
Spectrum Regulatory Best Practices
Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

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INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SLPB-007-17 — Extension to the reply comment period: Consultation on Releasing Millimetre Wave Spectrum to Support 5G

Notice No. SLPB-001-17, Consultation on Releasing Millimetre Wave Spectrum to Support 5G (http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11298.html), was published on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) at http://www.ised.gc.ca/spectrum on June 5, 2017. Notice No. SLPB-004-17, Extension to the comment period: Consultation on Releasing Millimetre Wave Spectrum to Support 5G was subsequently published on July 6, 2017, to extend the deadline for submission of comments to September 15, 2017, and the deadline for submission of reply comments to October 20, 2017.

The purpose of the present notice is to advise all interested parties that based on the volume of comments received during the initial comment period, the deadline for submission of reply comments has been extended to November 10, 2017. All comments received will be posted on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website at http://www.ic.gc.ca/spectrum.

Official versions of Canada Gazette notices can be viewed at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/index-eng.html.

October 6, 2017

Aline Chevrier
Acting Senior Director
Spectrum Licensing Policy Branch

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Business Development Bank of Canada

October 30, 2017

Members of the Board of Directors

Canada Post Corporation

November 17, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

November 6, 2017

Directors

Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

November 20, 2017

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Directors

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

October 25, 2017

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Director (Federal Representative)

Prince Rupert Port Authority

October 30, 2017

Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mint

November 13, 2017

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

October 23, 2017

Directors

Sustainable Development Technology Canada

November 6, 2017

Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

 

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

December 31, 2017

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

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