Vol. 151, No. 46 — November 18, 2017

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Guidelines for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Natural Gas–fuelled Stationary Combustion Turbines

Whereas on May 27, 2016, the Minister of the Environment published the proposed Guidelines for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Natural Gas–fuelled Stationary Combustion Turbines on the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA) Registry for comments;

Whereas the Minister has consulted with provincial governments and members of the National Advisory Committee.

Pursuant to subsection 54(4) of CEPA, the Minister of the Environment hereby gives notice of the release of the Guidelines for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Natural Gas–fuelled Stationary Combustion Turbines under subsection 54(1) of that Act.

Electronic copies may be downloaded from the Internet at the following address: (https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/canadian-environmental-protection-act-registry/guidelines-objectives-codes-practice/reduction-nitrogen-oxide-combustion-turbines-guidelines.html).

Helen Ryan
Director General
Energy and Transportation Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Guidelines for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Natural Gas–fuelled Stationary Combustion Turbines

November 2017

1. Foreword

The development of the Guidelines for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Natural Gas–fuelled Stationary Combustion Turbines (henceforth “the Guidelines”), published under section 54 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), follows the agreement made by federal, provincial and territorial environment ministers to better protect human health and the environment by endorsing and implementing a new Air Quality Management System (AQMS). The AQMS includes Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter and ground-level ozone, Base-level Industrial Emissions Requirements (BLIERs) and local Air Zone Management by the provincial/territorial jurisdictions.

Environment and Climate Change Canada led a multi-stakeholder BLIERs working group that developed consensus-based NOx emission requirements for new natural gas–fuelled stationary combustion turbines. These requirements form the foundation for the emission limits in the Guidelines.

The Guidelines introduce an NOx emission limit that is up to 50% more stringent than emission limits set out in the National Emission Guidelines for Stationary Combustion Turbines published by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) in 1992.

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change recommends that the appropriate regulatory authorities adopt the Guidelines as a baseline emission limit for NOx from natural gas–fuelled stationary combustion turbines. However, the Guidelines do not prevent provinces or territories from setting more stringent emission requirements for combustion turbines via their own policies. As well, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change continues to recommend those requirements of the 1992 CCME Guidelines that have not been superseded by the requirements in this document.

2. Definitions

The following definitions apply in these Guidelines:

“Calendar year” means the period of 12 consecutive months that begins on January 1.

“CFR” means Title 40, Chapter I of the Code of Federal Regulations of the United States.

“Cogeneration” means the integrated operation of one or more combustion turbines and steam generators that recover any heat from combustion turbine exhaust gases to supply steam for useful purposes other than electricity generation (e.g. to a heating system or an industrial process).

“Combined cycle” means the integrated operation of one or more combustion turbines and steam turbines for the production of electricity using the same source of thermal energy.

“Combustion turbine” means an engine that operates according to the Brayton thermodynamic cycle, which burns fuel and allows the products of combustion at a high temperature to expand through a rotating power turbine to produce motive power.

“Commissioning date” means the first day on which a combustion turbine begins to produce electricity or motive power.

“Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS)” means equipment for the sampling, conditioning and analyzing of emissions from a given source and recording of data related to those emissions.

“Emergency combustion turbine” means a combustion turbine that operates only in emergency situations, including to produce power for critical networks or equipment during electric power interruptions, to pump water in the case of fire or flood, or for equipment or facility re-start.

“Natural gas” means a naturally occurring fluid mixture of hydrocarbons (e.g. methane, ethane or propane) produced in geological formations beneath the Earth’s surface that maintains a gaseous state at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure under ordinary conditions. Natural gas is composed of at least 85% methane by volume, and it excludes landfill gas, digester gas, refinery gas, sour gas, blast furnace gas, coal-derived gas, producer gas, coke oven gas or any gaseous fuel produced in a process that might result in highly variable sulphur content or heating value.

“New combustion turbine” means a combustion turbine whose commissioning date is on or after January 1, 2020.

“Nitrogen oxide (NOx)” means oxides of nitrogen, which is the sum of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2).

“Operator” means a person who has the charge, management or control of a combustion turbine.

“Part-load operation” means the operation of the combustion turbine below 70% of its power rating.

“Peaking combustion turbine” means a combustion turbine that is operated for 1 500 hours or less within a calendar year.

“Power rating” means normal maximum continuous rating (in megawatts — MW) at International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 3977-2 environmental design point conditions of ambient air: 15°C (288K), 60% relative humidity and 101.3 kilopascals barometric pressure.

“Predictive Emission Monitoring System (PEMS)” means all of the equipment and related activities required to determine an emission concentration or an emission rate. This may include processor control devices, sensors, operating parameter measurements, conversion equations, graphs or computer programs to produce results in units of the applicable emission limit or standard.

“Shut-down period” means the period of time between the moment when the combustion turbine is operating at normal operating mode and the moment when it is non-operational.

“Simple cycle combustion turbine” means a combustion turbine that operates without harnessing the turbine exhaust heat for useful purposes.

“Start-up period” means the period of time between the moment when the combustion turbine is non-operational and the moment when it is operating at normal operating mode.

3. Scope

4. NOx Emission Limits

Table 1: Natural gas combustion turbines NOx emission limits — output-based method

Application

Turbine Power Rating (MW)

NOx Emission Limits
(g/GJ(energy output))

Non-peaking combustion turbines — mechanical drive

≥1 and <4

500

Non-peaking combustion turbines — electricity generation

≥1 and <4

290

Peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 1*)

≥1 and <4

exempt

Non-peaking combustion turbines and peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 2*)

≥4 and ≤70

140

Non-peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 3*)

>70

85

Peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 4*)

>70

140


Table 2: Natural gas combustion turbines NOx emission limits — concentration-based method

Application


Turbine Power Rating (MW)

NOx Emission Limits (ppmv (see note 5*)) at 15% O2

Non-peaking combustion turbines — mechanical drive

≥1 and <4

75

Non-peaking combustion turbines — electricity generation

≥1 and <4

42

Peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 1**)

≥1 and <4

exempt

Non-peaking combustion turbines and peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 2**)

≥4 and ≤70

25

Non-peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 3**)

>70

15

Peaking combustion turbines — all (see note 4**)

>70

25

5. Testing and Monitoring

Appendix 1: Quantification Protocol

A. Compliance Determination: Testing Methods

Output-based Method

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(1)

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(2)

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(3)

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(4)

Concentration-based Method

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(5)

Equation - Detailed information can be found in the surrounding text.

(6)

B. Quantification of Production

  1. The operator of the combustion turbine should install, maintain and operate a device to measure the mechanical output and, as the case may be, the gross electrical output of the combustion turbine during NOx testing. The combined values from these devices should give the power (mechanical and/or electric) output of the unit.
  2. The operator of the combustion turbine should install, maintain and operate a device to measure the heat output delivered by the combustion turbine operating in a cogeneration application during NOx testing.

C. Compliance Determination: Continuous Emissions Monitoring System

  1. A Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) may be used to measure NOx emissions in lieu of stack testing.
  2. A CEMS should be used on non-peaking electricity generating combustion turbines with a power rating greater than 25 MW.
  3. The CEMS should meet the specifications for design, installation, certification and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) set out in the method published by Environment and Climate Change Canada entitled Protocols and Performance Specifications for Continuous Monitoring of Gaseous Emissions from Thermal Power Generation (EPS 1/PG/7) or the method published by Alberta Environmental Protection entitled Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS) Code.
  4. As an alternative, a Predictive Emission Monitoring System (PEMS) is an acceptable equivalent to a CEMS if it meets the EPA method entitled Method 16 — Specifications and Test Procedures for Predictive Emission Monitoring Systems in Stationary Sources, set out in the Title 40, Chapter I, Subchapter C, Part 60 of the CFR.
  5. NOx emissions information (e.g. data averages) should be collected for the purpose of these Guidelines when the turbine operates at the conditions outlined in Part D.
  6. For the output-based method, the operator should also, during the period of data collection
    • a. Install, maintain and operate a device to measure heat input so that NOx emissions information can be converted to mass per hour emission rate using equation B-1 in Appendix B of the method published by Environment and Climate Change Canada entitled Protocols and Performance Specifications for Continuous Monitoring of Gaseous Emissions from Thermal Power Generation (EPS 1/PG/7). An average rate should be determined.
    • b. Install, maintain and operate a device to continuously measure the mechanical and, as the case may be, the gross electrical output of the unit; determine the combined mechanical and electric output of the unit; calculate the average hourly output.
    • c. Measure the heat output delivered from the combustion turbine operating in a cogeneration application during an emissions testing period; calculate the average hourly output.
    • d. Verify compliance with the applicable output-based limit by calculating the emission rate using equations (3) and (4) in Part A.

D. Operating Conditions

  1. The measurement of NOx emissions should be done under normal operating conditions as follows:
    • a. All emission performance tests should be conducted when the combustion turbine is operated at a load level that is within 70% to 100% of its power rating.
    • b. Despite paragraph (a), testing may be conducted at the highest achievable load, if it is not practically possible to operate the combustion turbine at a load equal to or greater than 70% of its power rating.
    • c. Testing should reflect typical operation conditions and fuel characteristics. Testing under atypical or artificial conditions will not satisfy the requirements of these guidelines.
    • d. Testing should be done at ambient temperatures greater than or equal to −18°C.
  2. When more than one combustion turbine is venting through a common stack, the emission samples taken from that stack should take place with one combustion turbine operating at a time.

    However, if more than one combustion turbine shares air emission control equipment, one emission sample can be taken for all turbines when taken downstream of the air emission control equipment.

E. Accuracy of Data

  1. Measurement devices required for these Guidelines should be calibrated at the most frequent of the following:
    • a. at least once every three calendar years;
    • b. at the frequency recommended by the manufacturer; or
    • c. as specified in the test methods for the devices.
  2. Each measurement device should enable measurements to be made within an accuracy of ± 5%.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of five substances in the Poly(bios) Group — tannins, humic acids, oxidized starch, SEGAC and GEGAC — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas oxidized starch is a substance identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on tannins, humic acids, SEGAC and GEGAC pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act and on oxidized starch pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby; and

Whereas it is proposed to conclude that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html). All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819-938-5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the draft screening assessment of the Poly(bios) Group

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of five substances referred to collectively as the Poly(bios) Group. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority based on other human health concerns. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS RN (see footnote 4)) of the substances, their Domestic Substances List names and their acronyms are listed in the table below.

Substances in the Poly(bios) Group

CAS RN (see footnote 5)

Domestic Substances List name

Acronym

1401-55-4 (see note a)

Tannins

1415-93-6 (see note b)

Humic acids

65996-62-5

Starch, oxidized

56780-58-6 (see note c)

Starch, 2-hydroxy-3-(trimethylammonio)propyl ether, chloride

SEGAC

65497-29-2 (see note d)

Guar gum, 2-hydroxy-3-(trimethylammonio)propyl ether, chloride

GEGAC

These five substances were previously evaluated under the second phase of polymer rapid screening, which identified tannins, humic acid and oxidized starch as having low potential to cause ecological harm, and SEGAC and GEGAC as having low potential to cause harm to human health. However, they were identified as requiring further assessment for potential human health or ecological risks on the basis of structural alerts and/or uses associated with significant consumer exposure. The present assessment further elaborates on the potential for tannins, humic acid and oxidized starch to cause harm to human health, and for SEGAC and GEGAC to cause ecological harm, in order to reach an overall conclusion under section 64 of CEPA as to whether or not they pose a risk to the environment or human health.

Tannins occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, they are reported to be used in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, fabric and textile industries. It has been reported that volumes between 100 and 1 000 kg of tannic acid (the most commonly used tannin) were either imported or manufactured in Canada in 2014. Tannins do not contain any reactive functional groups or other structural features associated with human health concerns. The toxicological information available indicates that it has a low hazard profile for human health. Tannins are naturally occurring in a number of botanical sources, and tannic acid can be used as a food additive. Therefore, direct exposure is expected; however, indirect exposure through drinking water is negligible.

Humic acid occurs naturally in the environment. In Canada, it is reported to be used in cosmetics and natural health products. Import volumes of up to 100 000 kg of humic acid have been reported for the year 2014. Humic acid does not contain any reactive functional groups or other structural features associated with human health concerns. The toxicological information available indicates that it has a low hazard profile for human health. Humic substances are naturally occurring in the environment; however, both direct and indirect exposure to humic acid is expected to be negligible.

Oxidized starch does not occur naturally in the environment. In Canada, it is reported to be used in the paper and textile industries. It has been reported that greater than 10 million kilograms of oxidized starch were either imported or manufactured in Canada in 2014. The reactive aldehyde groups present in oxidized starch are found to be at very low amounts and do not present a human health hazard. No other toxicological concerns were identified; therefore, oxidized starch has a low hazard profile for human health. Oxidized starch is used as a food ingredient and, therefore, direct exposure from the diet is expected.

SEGAC is a cationic modified starch compound that does not occur naturally in the environment. According to available information, SEGAC is used in the pulp and paper industries, and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg were imported into Canada in 2014. Based on the use pattern and exposure pattern, SEGAC is not expected to pose a risk to the environment.

GEGAC is manufactured by modifying guar gum with cationic functionality. It does not occur naturally in the environment. Up to 100 000 kg of GEGAC were imported into Canada in 2014 and reported to be used in personal care products. Considering the use patterns and hazard profile, GEGAC is not expected to pose a risk to the environment.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this assessment, there is low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from tannins, humic acid, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC. It is proposed to conclude that tannins, humic acid, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or their biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that tannins, humic acid, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that tannins, humic acid, oxidized starch, SEGAC, and GEGAC do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — benzenesulfonamide, 2-methyl- (2-MBS), CAS RN (see footnote 6) 88-19-7 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the final screening assessment conducted on 2-MBS pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health propose to take no further action on the substance at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the final screening assessment of 2-MBS

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of benzenesulfonamide, 2-methyl-, hereinafter referred to as 2-MBS. The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for 2-MBS is 88-19-7. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment based on human health concerns.

2-MBS does not occur naturally in the environment. In 2011, there were no reports of manufacture above the reporting threshold of 100 kg for 2-MBS; between 1 000 and 10 000 kg of 2-MBS were imported into Canada. It is used primarily as an intermediate for fluorescent pigments and plasticizer resins and as a plasticizer for hot-melt adhesives. 2-MBS is used in cosmetics as an ingredient in nail polish and may be formed in small amounts during the manufacture of the food additive saccharin (according to regulations specific to food-grade specifications for additives, saccharin can contain no more than 10 parts per million of 2-MBS as an impurity).

The ecological risk of 2-MBS was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC). The ERC is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based on weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity are established. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances based on their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified 2-MBS as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to organisms and the broader integrity of the environment from 2-MBS. It is concluded that 2-MBS does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

For the general population of Canada, the potential exposure to 2-MBS was estimated as a total daily intake from environmental media (i.e. drinking water, dust and food). As well, exposure from use of nail polish containing 2-MBS was characterized.

The critical health effects were developmental effects, as well as effects on the liver and kidneys. Margins of exposure comparing effect levels for the critical health effects and the estimated exposures of the general population were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases for 2-MBS.

Based on the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that 2-MBS does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

Therefore, it is concluded that 2-MBS does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The final screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website (https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/chemical-substances.html).

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DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Clements, The Hon. Tracey L.

2017-1284

Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island

 

Chief Justice

 

Prince Edward Island Court of Appeal

 

Judge ex officio

 

Kurz, The Hon. Marvin

2017-1282

Superior Court of Justice in and for the Province of Ontario

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 

Judge ex officio

 

Lachance, The Hon. Myriam

2017-1283

Superior Court for the district of Montréal in and for the Province of Quebec

 

Puisne Judge

 

Morrison, David

2017-1325

Associate Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

Parole Board of Canada

 

Part-time members

 

Atlantic Regional Division

 

Niles, David A. J.

2017-1312

Parsons, Kelvin

2017-1310

Shea, Joan

2017-1311

Pacific Regional Division

 

Bruce, Halie

2017-1315

D’Souza, Kevin

2017-1316

Stuart, Charles R.

2017-1314

Sullivan, Charles Stanley

2017-1309

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada

 

Full-time member and Vice-Chairperson

 

Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island

 

Judges

 

Prince Edward Island Court of Appeal

 

Judges ex officio

 

Gormley, James W., Q.C./c.r.

2017-1286

MacPherson, Terri A., Q.C./c.r.

2017-1285

Thompson, Paul

2017-1327

Associate Deputy Minister of Industry, to be styled Associate Deputy Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

 

Vandergrift, Michael

2017-1326

Associate Deputy Minister of Public Works and Government Services, to be styled Associate Deputy Minister of Public Services and Procurement

 

November 9, 2017

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Brantford Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, October 24, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Fredericton Police Force as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, October 24, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Ottawa Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, October 24, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Saskatoon Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, October 24, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following persons of the Thunder Bay Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, October 31, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Saskatoon Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Ottawa, October 24, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following persons of the Windsor Police Service as fingerprint examiners:

Ottawa, October 31, 2017

Kathy Thompson
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

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PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. Moving forward, the Government of Canada will use an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous Canadians and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We will continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website (http://www.appointments-nominations.gc.ca/slctnPrcs.asp?menu=1&lang=eng).

Position

Organization

Closing date

President and Chief Executive Officer

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Commissioner (Canada)

British Columbia Treaty Commission

November 30, 2017

Chairperson

Business Development Bank of Canada

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Air Transport Security Authority

November 23, 2017

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Dairy Commission

November 20, 2017

Directors

Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

November 20, 2017

Member

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada (N.B., N.W.T.)

November 22, 2017

Deputy Chairperson

Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Refugee Appeal Division

December 14, 2017

Commissioner

International Commission on the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas

November 30, 2017

Governor

International Development Research Centre

December 15, 2017

Members (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Directors

Invest in Canada Hub

November 29, 2017

Chairperson

Military Grievances External Review Committee

November 23, 2017

Commissioner

North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization

November 30, 2017

Commissioner

North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission

November 30, 2017

Chief Electoral Officer

Office of the Chief Electoral Officer

 

Commissioner of Lobbying

Office of the Commissioner of Lobbying

 

Commissioner of Official Languages

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada

 

Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner

 

Information Commissioner

Office of the Information Commissioner

 

Senate Ethics Officer

Office of the Senate Ethics Officer

 

Directors

Ridley Terminals Inc.

November 20, 2017

Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mint

November 27, 2017

Commissioner

Royal Canadian Mounted Police

 

Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

 

Ongoing opportunities

Opportunities posted on an ongoing basis.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Full-time and Part-time Members

Immigration and Refugee Board

December 31, 2017

Members

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

December 31, 2017

Upcoming opportunities

New opportunities that will be posted in the coming weeks.

Position

Organization

Chairperson

Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Sergeant-at-Arms

House of Commons

Commissioner

International Joint Commission

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