Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 17: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

April 27, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Ministerial Condition No. 19823

Ministerial Condition

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information pertaining to the substance benzoic acid, 2-benzoyl-, methyl ester, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 606-28-0;

And whereas the ministers suspect that the substance is toxic or capable of becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act),

The Minister of the Environment, pursuant to paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Act, hereby permits the manufacture or import of the substance in accordance with the conditions set out in the following annex.

Nancy Hamzawi
Assistant Deputy Minister
Science and Technology Branch

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Conditions

(Paragraph 84(1)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definitions apply in these ministerial conditions:

2. The notifier may manufacture or import the substance in accordance with the present ministerial conditions.

Restrictions

3. The notifier may manufacture and import the substance subject to the following conditions:

4. The notifier must not import the substance if it is present in any of the following:

5. The notifier shall transfer the physical possession or control of the substance only to a person who will use it only in accordance with section 3.

Record-keeping requirements

6. (1) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records, with any documentation supporting the validity of the information contained in these records, indicating

(2) The notifier shall maintain electronic or paper records mentioned in subsection (1) at their principal place of business in Canada, or at the principal place of business in Canada of their representative, for a period of at least five years after they are made.

Other requirements

7. The notifier shall inform any person to whom they transfer the physical possession or control of the substance, in writing, of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. The notifier shall obtain, prior to the first transfer of the substance, written confirmation from this person that they were informed of the terms of the present ministerial conditions. This written confirmation shall be maintained at the principal place of business in Canada of the notifier or of their representative in Canada for a period of at least five years from the day it was received.

8. Section 7 does not apply in relation to the substance that is present in paints and other architectural coatings, as defined in the Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings Regulations, or in wall plasters or joint sealants.

Coming into force

9. These ministerial conditions come into force on April 1, 2019.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three substances of the Fatty Amides Group — 13-docosenamide, (Z)- (erucamide), CAS RN footnote 1 112-84-5, 9-octadecenamide, (Z)- (oleamide), CAS RN 301-02-0, and isooctadecanoic acid, reaction products with tetraethylenepentamine (IODA reaction products with TEPA), CAS RN 68784-17-8 footnote 2 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas erucamide, oleamide and IODA reaction products with TEPA are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on erucamide, oleamide and IODA reaction products with TEPA pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Fatty Amides Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of 3 of the 12 substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Fatty Amides Group. These 3 substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA. Five of the 12 substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. footnote 3 In addition, 4 substances were placed into other substance groups to which they were more appropriately suited, on the basis of structural features or functionalities of toxicological significance. footnote 4 The 3 substances addressed in this screening assessment will hereinafter be referred to as the Fatty Amides Group.

Substances in the Fatty Amides Group

CAS RN

Domestic Substances List name

Common name

Table 1 Notes

Table 1 Note a

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (substances of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological material).

Return to table 1 note a referrer

112-84-5

13-Docosenamide, (Z)-

Erucamide

301-02-0

9-Octadecenamide, (Z)-

Oleamide

68784-17-8table 1 note a

Isooctadecanoic acid, reaction products with tetraethylenepentamine

IODA reaction products with TEPA

Erucamide and oleamide are naturally occurring substances that may be produced in the environment by abiotic processes (e.g. forest fires) or by biota. In 2011, they were not reported to be manufactured in Canada, but were imported for use primarily for the manufacture of plastic products and rubbers. In the same year, between 1 000 000 and 10 000 000 kg of erucamide and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of oleamide were imported into Canada. The presence of erucamide and oleamide in environmental media, food or products may result from natural or anthropogenic sources.

IODA reaction products with TEPA is not naturally occurring. In 2011, this substance was not reported to be manufactured in Canada and between 100 and 1 000 kg of the substance were imported into Canada. Uses of IODA reaction products with TEPA in Canada are limited to lubricants and greases, primarily as components in 2-cycle marine outboard engine oils. Releases of this substance to the environment are expected to be minimal from industrial and consumer use.

The ecological risks of erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA were characterized using the ecological risk classification (ERC) of organic substances, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure based upon weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA are considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA. It is concluded that erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Erucamide and oleamide exhibit low acute toxicity and are not genotoxic. No adverse effects were noted for erucamide in repeated-dose and developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals; erucamide is therefore considered to be of low hazard potential. Limited health effects information was available for oleamide; however, as erucamide and oleamide are similar with respect to their chemical structure, physical and chemical properties, and toxicokinetics, oleamide is similarly expected to be of low hazard potential.

IODA reaction products with TEPA exhibits low acute toxicity and is not genotoxic. No adverse health effects were noted in a short-term repeated-dose toxicity study or in a combined developmental and reproductive toxicity study. IODA reaction products with TEPA is expected to be of low hazard potential.

Considering the low toxicity of erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA, the potential risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that erucamide, oleamide, and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that erucamide, oleamide and IODA reaction products with TEPA do not meet any of the criteria set out under section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of results of investigations and recommendations for a substance — cyclohexane, 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3,3-trimethyl- (isophorone diisocyanate; IPDI), CAS RN footnote 5 4098-71-9 — specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on IPDI pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substance does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on this substance at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of cyclohexane, 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3,3-trimethyl-

Pursuant to section 68 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of cyclohexane, 5-isocyanato-1-(isocyanatomethyl)-1,3,3-trimethyl-, hereinafter referred to as isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) for IPDI is 4098-71-9. This substance is among those substances identified as priorities for assessment on the basis of other human health concerns.

IPDI does not occur naturally in the environment. It is used primarily as a monomer to make various polymers, such as polyurethanes. According to information submitted in response to a survey under CEPA section 71, there was no manufacture of IPDI in Canada in 2011. A total of 111 104 kg of IPDI was imported into Canada in 2011. IPDI has been reported to be found in paints and coatings, adhesives and sealants, and floor coverings.

The ecological risk of IPDI was characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC), which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure, with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are based principally on metrics regarding mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. Based on the outcome of the ERC analysis, IPDI is considered unlikely to be causing ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from IPDI. It is concluded that IPDI does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

The general population is not expected to be exposed to IPDI via environmental media, food or drinking water. IPDI may be used in a small number of automotive paint hardeners available to consumers. Air concentrations of IPDI from the do-it-yourself use of these products were modelled and compared with the critical health effect levels for IPDI. Changes in the nasal cavity and larynx indicative of airway irritation were identified as the critical health effect for IPDI. The resultant margins of exposure are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that IPDI does not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as it is not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that IPDI does not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for this substance is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Decisions, undertakings and orders on claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the decisions of the screening officer respecting each claim for exemption and the relevant safety data sheet (SDS) and (where applicable) the label listed below.

In accordance with section 20 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, a claimant or any affected party, as defined, may appeal a decision or order of a screening officer. An affected party may also appeal an undertaking in respect of which a notice has been published in the Canada Gazette. To initiate the appeal process, a Statement of Appeal (Form 1) as prescribed by the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act Appeal Board Procedures Regulations must be completed and delivered, along with the fee prescribed by section 12 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations, within 45 days of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the Chief Appeals Officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor, 4908B, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended, and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

All claims for exemption in this publication were filed and evaluated in accordance with the provisions of WHMIS 2015.

A Notice of Filing was published in Part I of the Canada Gazette and there were no written representations from affected parties with respect to any of the claims for exemption and related SDSs or labels mentioned below.

Each of the claims for exemption listed in the table below was found to be valid except for registry numbers (RNs) 9611 and 9613, which were found to be partially valid, and RN 10009, which was found to be invalid. The screening officer reached this decision after reviewing the information in support of the claim, having regard exclusively to the criteria found in section 3 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Regulations.

RN

Claimant

Product Identifier

Date of Decision

9611

TBF Environmental Technology Inc.

BerdeSol

2019-01-23

9613

TBF Environmental Technology Inc.

KradaSol

2019-01-23

10009

BWA Water Additives US LLC

BELLASOL S29

2019-02-20

12064

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

SPEC-AID 8Q5701

2019-02-04

12066

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

FERROQUEST LP7200

2019-02-04

12067

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

FERROQUEST LP7202

2019-02-04

12071

Suez Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

LOSALT LS1512

2019-02-04

In all cases where the SDS or the label was determined not to be in compliance with the relevant legislation, pursuant to subsection 16.1(1) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the claimant was given 30 days to provide the screening officer with a signed undertaking accompanied by the SDS or the label amended as necessary.

Non-compliances that fall outside the scope of what is required to be published in the Canada Gazette are referred to as “administrative non-compliances.”

Please refer to Health Canada’s List of Active Claims for Exemption for a description of “administrative non-compliances” and their associated corrective measures.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER WAS SATISFIED THAT THE CLAIMANT HAD TAKEN THE MEASURES SET OUT IN THE UNDERTAKING

Pursuant to paragraph 18(1)(b) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that has been disclosed on the relevant SDS or label in compliance with an undertaking and the date on which the notice referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act was issued.

RN: 12064

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the hazard classification of “Specific target organ toxicity, single exposure — Category 1 (oral, kidney)”.
  2. Disclose the symbol or name of symbol for “Exclamation mark”.
  3. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  4. Disclose the applicable common names and synonyms for the ingredient “Ethylene glycol”.
  5. Disclose the special treatment needed for ethylene glycol poisoning.
  6. Disclose that “Ethylene glycol” has been shown to cause specific target organic toxicity with a single oral exposure, affecting the kidneys and the central nervous system, under the subheading “Specific target organ toxicity — single exposure”.

RN: 12066

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the hazard classifications of “Skin Corrosion/Irritation — Category 1,” and “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the applicable common names and synonyms for the ingredients “Adipic acid” and “Picric acid”.
  4. Disclose a statement conveying “Take off immediately all contaminated clothing” for skin contact and “Do not induce vomiting” for ingestion.
  5. Disclose the symptoms and effects related to skin corrosion/irritation and skin sensitization.
  6. Disclose the corrosive effects due to skin contact and ingestion under the applicable routes of exposure.
  7. Disclose the symptoms related to the “Skin Corrosion/Irritation — Category 1”, “Serious Eye Damage — Category 1” and the “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1” classifications of the product.
  8. Disclose the percent unknown acute dermal, inhalation, and oral toxicity.
  9. Disclose that skin contact may cause skin corrosion under the subheading “Skin corrosion/irritation”.
  10. Disclose that the product may cause skin sensitization under the subheading “Skin sensitization”.

RN: 12067

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-11

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the hazard classifications of “Skin Corrosion/Irritation — Category 1,” and “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the applicable common names and synonyms for the ingredients “Adipic acid” and “Picric acid”.
  4. Disclose a statement conveying “Take off immediately all contaminated clothing” for skin contact and “Do not induce vomiting” for ingestion.
  5. Disclose the symptoms and effects related to skin corrosion/irritation and skin sensitization.
  6. Disclose the corrosive effects due to skin contact and ingestion under the applicable routes of exposure.
  7. Disclose the symptoms related to the “Skin Corrosion/Irritation — Category 1”, “Serious Eye Damage — Category  1” and the “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1” classifications of the product.
  8. Disclose the percent unknown acute dermal, inhalation, and oral toxicity.
  9. Disclose that skin contact may cause skin corrosion under the subheading “Skin corrosion/irritation”.
  10. Disclose that the product may cause skin sensitization under the subheading “Skin sensitization”.

RN: 12071

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the percent of unknown toxicity of 1.4% for the calculated product inhalation ATE value.
  2. Disclose the applicable common names and synonyms for the ingredient “N-methylmorpholine”.
  3. Disclose the calculated dermal ATE of 2 580 mg/kg (1.4% unknown) and calculated inhalation (vapour) ATE of 18 mg/L (1.4% unknown).
  4. Correct the disclosure of misleading information regarding the LD50 (rat, oral) value for the confidential ingredient “Amino ether” and the LD50 (rabbit, dermal) for the ingredient “N-methylmorpholine”.

CLAIMS FOR WHICH THE SCREENING OFFICER ISSUED THE DECISION THAT THE CLAIM FOR EXEMPTION WAS EITHER PARTIALLY VALID OR INVALID

In the case of the following claims, the screening officer issued the decision that the claims for exemption were partially valid.

Pursuant to section 18 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on an SDS or a label pursuant to subsection 16(1) and information that has been disclosed on the relevant SDS or label in compliance with an undertaking, and the dates on which the orders and notices referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act were issued.

RN: 9611

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional hazard classification “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1B”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose the boiling range of the product.
  4. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “Aryl halide” has been shown to be a skin irritant.

RN: 9613

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-03-12

The claimant had been advised to correct administrative non-compliances in the SDS (or label) and had been further advised to amend the SDS (or label) as indicated below.

  1. Disclose the additional hazard classification “Skin Sensitizer — Category 1B”.
  2. Disclose the additional information elements concerning hazard and precautionary statements.
  3. Disclose a generic chemical name that is consistent with the HMIRA claim for exemption for the confidential ingredient that is subject to the exemption.
  4. Disclose the information on the boiling range of the product.
  5. Disclose that the confidential ingredient “Aryl halide” has been shown to be a skin irritant.

In the case of the following claim, the screening officer issued the decision that the claim for exemption was invalid.

Pursuant to section 18 of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of information that the screening officer ordered to be disclosed on an SDS or label pursuant to subsection 16(1) and information that has been disclosed on the relevant SDS or label in compliance with an undertaking, and the dates on which the orders and notices referred to in subsection 16.1(3) of the Act were issued.

RN: 10009

Date of compliance undertaking: 2019-02-20

The claimant had been advised to amend the SDS (or label) to remove the link to the HMIRA registry number.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION REVIEW ACT

Filing of claims for exemption

Pursuant to paragraph 12(1)(a) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, the Chief Screening Officer hereby gives notice of the filing of the claims for exemption listed below.

In accordance with subsection 12(2) of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act, affected parties, as defined, may make written representations to the screening officer with respect to the claim for exemption and the safety data sheet (SDS) or label to which it relates. Written representations must cite the appropriate registry number, state the reasons and evidence upon which the representations are based and be delivered within 30 days of the date of the publication of this notice in the Canada Gazette, Part I, to the screening officer at the following address: Workplace Hazardous Materials Bureau, 269 Laurier Avenue West, 8th Floor (4908-B), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9.

Véronique Lalonde
Chief Screening Officer

On February 11, 2015, the Hazardous Products Act (HPA) was amended and the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) and the Ingredient Disclosure List were repealed and replaced with the new Hazardous Products Regulations (HPR). The revised legislation (HPA/HPR) is referred to as WHMIS 2015.

The claims listed below seek an exemption from the disclosure of supplier confidential business information in respect of a hazardous product; such disclosure would otherwise be required under the provisions of the relevant legislation.

Claimant

Product Identifier

Subject of the Claim for Exemption

Registry Number

Akzo Nobel Surface Chemistry LLC

Redicote AP-1

C.i. of one ingredient

12371

The Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ FS-34

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03321975

The Chemours Canada Company

Capstone™ FS-35

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03321976

Hexion Inc.

EPIKURE™ Curing Agent 3155

C.i. of one ingredient

03321980

Hexion Inc.

EPIKURE™ Curing Agent 3383

C.i. and C. of one ingredient
C. of three ingredients

03321981

Kop-Coat

Enhance™ X

C.i. and C. of seven ingredients

03322418

Evonik Corporation

Ancamide 2634

C.i. of one ingredient

03322420

Exaltexx Inc.

Lubexx

C.i. and C. of five ingredients

03323460

Afton Chemical Corporation

Hitec® 5738 Performance Additive

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03323688

Afton Chemical Corporation

Hitec® 5769 Performance Additive

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03323689

Nalco Canada ULC

CORR11510A

C.i. and C. of four ingredients

03323792

DuBois Chemicals Canada Inc.

Envirobind APS

C.i. and C. of seven ingredients

03324182

Chevron Oronite Company LLC

OLOA® 54457

C.i. of two ingredients

03324896

Ingevity Corporation

INDULIN SA-L

C.i. and C. of three ingredients

03324898

BASF Canada Inc.

Irgalube FE1

C.i. of one ingredient

03325051

Nalco Canada ULC

PROE27012A

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03325175

Baker Hughes Canada Company

ARKLEAR 4047

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03325212

Ingevity Corporation

MORLIFE 5000

C.i. and C. of eight ingredients

03325495

SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

E.C.O.Film EF2491

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03325675

BASF Canada Inc.

Inoterra DWF

C.i. and C. of two ingredients

03325682

SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions Canada

E.C.O.FILM EF2492

C.i. and C. of one ingredient

03325689

Note: C.i. = chemical identity and C. = concentration

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. SMSE-005-19 — Release of ICES-003, issue 6 (updated in April 2019)

Notice is hereby given that Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) has published an updated version of the following standard:

This updated standard will come into force upon publication on the official publications section of the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

General information

The Interference-Causing Equipment Standards list will be amended accordingly.

Submitting comments

Comments and suggestions for improving this standard may be submitted online using the Standard Change Request form.

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on the Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

April 18, 2019

Martin Proulx
Director General
Engineering, Planning and Standards Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Commercial Corporation

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member

International Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Marine Atlantic Inc.

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

Chairperson

National Research Council of Canada

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson (all streams)

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada

 

Member (Marine and Medical)

Transportation Appeal Tribunal of Canada