Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 20: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

May 18, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION

IMMIGRATION AND REFUGEE PROTECTION ACT

Order Repealing Certain Orders Made Under Section 109.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, pursuant to section 109.1 footnote a of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act footnote b, makes the annexed Order Repealing Certain Orders Made Under Section 109.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Ottawa, May 9, 2019

Ahmed D. Hussen
Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Order Repealing Certain Orders Made Under Section 109.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

Repeals

Quantitative Thresholds for the Designation of Countries of Origin

1 The Order Establishing Quantitative Thresholds for the Designation of Countries of Origin footnote 1 is repealed.

Order Designating Countries of Origin

2 The Order Designating Countries of Origin footnote 2, as amended by the Order Amending the Order Designating Countries of Origin footnote 3, is repealed.

Coming into Force

May 10, 2019

3 This Order comes into force on May 10, 2019, but if it is made after that day, it comes into force on the day on which it is made.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Federal environmental quality guidelines for copper

Whereas the Minister of the Environment issues the environmental quality guidelines for the purpose of carrying out the Minister’s mandate related to preserving the quality of the environment;

Whereas the guidelines relate to the environment pursuant to paragraph 54(2)(a) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

And whereas the Minister of the Environment has offered to consult provincial and territorial governments and the members of the National Advisory Committee who are representatives of Indigenous governments in accordance with subsection 54(3) of the Act,

Notice is hereby given that federal environmental quality guidelines for copper are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19473

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance aluminium magnesium vanadium oxide, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 170621-28-0, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Act, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definition applies in this notice:

2. In relation to the substance, a significant new activity is any of the following:

3. Despite section 2, a use of the substance is not a significant new activity if the substance is used as a research and development substance or as a site-limited intermediate substance as these terms are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers), or as an export-only substance.

4. For each proposed significant new activity, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the day on which the activity begins:

5. The test data and test reports described in section 4 must be conducted in conformity with the laboratory practices described in the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice set out in Annex II of the Decision of the Council Concerning the Mutual Acceptance of Data in the Assessment of Chemicals, adopted on May 12, 1981, that are current at the time the test is conducted. Furthermore, all tests regarding the substance must be conducted in accordance with the principles described in the following guidance documents, which are current at the time the test is conducted:

6. In addition to the test data and test reports described in section 4, the following information must be provided for each of the test material used to generate the test data and test reports:

7. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to aluminium magnesium vanadium oxide, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 170621-28-0. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to aluminium magnesium vanadium oxide, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 170621-28-0, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for the significant new activity.

In order to address human toxicity and environmental concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance manufactured at the nanoscale (i.e. 1–100 nm) in commercial manufacturing activities.

Notification is required when, during a calendar year, the total quantity of the substance manufactured at the nanoscale (i.e. 1–100 nm) in the product is greater than the specified trigger quantities mentioned in the Notice. For example, notification is required if a person plans to use the substance manufactured at the nanoscale (i.e. 1–100 nm) where there is more than 1 000 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year. It should be noted that the term “manufactured” includes engineering processes and the control of matter. More details on the term “manufactured” are available in the Policy Statement on Health Canada’s Working Definition for Nanomaterial.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act, are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or, in some circumstances, to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance aluminium magnesium vanadium oxide, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 170621-28-0, is used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with potential activities involving use of the substance containing particles at the nanoscale. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used at the nanoscale to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before significant new activities are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, toxicity to human health, and environmental concerns. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDSs), formerly “material safety data sheets” (MSDSs). More details are contained in the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment.

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance aluminium magnesium vanadium oxide, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 170621-28-0, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or who has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc Notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans. A PNC is also recommended to ensure a SNAN is required, as these SNAc provisions only require notification when the substance is manufactured at the nanoscale (i.e. 1–100 nm).

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a Notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800‑567‑1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819‑938‑3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Significant New Activity Notice No. 19782

Significant New Activity Notice

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) have assessed information in their possession in respect of the substance nonadecane, 9-methylene-, mixed with 1-decene, dimers and trimers, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1000172-32-6, under section 83 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas the substance is not specified on the Domestic Substances List;

And whereas the ministers suspect that a significant new activity in relation to the substance may result in the substance becoming toxic within the meaning of section 64 of the Act,

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment indicates, pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, that subsection 81(4) of that Act applies with respect to the substance in accordance with the Annex.

The Honourable Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

ANNEX

Information requirements

(Section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

1. The following definition applies in this notice:

2. In relation to the substance, a significant new activity is

3. Despite item 2, a use of the substance is not a significant new activity if the substance is used

4. For each proposed significant new activity described in item 2, the following information must be provided to the Minister of the Environment at least 90 days before the activity begins:

5. The above-mentioned information will be assessed within 90 days after the day on which it is received by the Minister of the Environment.

Transitional provisions

6. Despite item 2, in the period between the date of publication of the present notice and June 8, 2020, a significant new activity is

7. For greater certainty, in respect of calendar year 2020, the quantity of substance that is used before June 8 of that calendar year is not considered for the purposes of section 2.

EXPLANATORY NOTE

(This explanatory note is not part of the Significant New Activity Notice.)

Description

This Significant New Activity (SNAc) Notice is a legal instrument adopted by the Minister of the Environment pursuant to section 85 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (the Act) to apply the SNAc provisions of that Act to nonadecane, 9-methylene-, mixed with 1-decene, dimers and trimers, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1000172-32-6. The Notice is now in force. It is therefore mandatory to meet all the requirements of the Notice should a person intend to use the substance for a significant new activity as defined in the Notice.

A SNAc Notice does not constitute an endorsement from the Department of the Environment or the Government of Canada of the substance to which it relates, or an exemption from any other laws or regulations that are in force in Canada and that may apply to this substance or activities involving the substance.

Applicability of the Significant New Activity Notice

The Notice requires that any person (individual or corporation) engaging in a significant new activity in relation to nonadecane, 9-methylene-, mixed with 1-decene, dimers and trimers, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1000172-32-6, submit a Significant New Activity notification (SNAN) containing all of the information prescribed in the Notice at least 90 days prior to using the substance for this activity.

In order to address the human toxicity concerns, the Notice requires notification in relation to the use of the substance in the manufacture or the distribution for resale of consumer products or cosmetics intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol applications when the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight. For example, notification is required if a person plans to manufacture a product containing the substance for consumer uses in lubricant, grease or fluid products intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol and the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight.

In addition, a notification is required if a person plans to distribute for resale a product containing the substance for consumer uses in lubricant, grease or fluid products intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol and the concentration of the substance is greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight where there is more than 10 kg of the substance involved in a calendar year.

The Notice targets any use of the substance in consumer products to which the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act (CCPSA) applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). A SNAN is required 90 days before the use of the substance in a Significant New Activity.

Activities not subject to the Notice

The following activities are not significant new activities.

Uses of the substance that are regulated under the Acts of Parliament listed in Schedule 2 of the Act, including the Pest Control Products Act, the Fertilizers Act and the Feeds Act, are excluded from the Notice. The Notice also does not apply to transient reaction intermediates, impurities, contaminants, partially unreacted materials, or, in some circumstances, to items such as, but not limited to, wastes, mixtures, or manufactured items. However, it should be noted that individual components of a mixture may be subject to notification under the provisions of the Act. See subsection 81(6) and section 3 of the Act, and section 3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers for additional information.

Activities involving the use of the substance as a research and development substance or a site-limited intermediate or an export-only product are excluded from the Notice. The terms “research and development substance” and “site-limited intermediate substance” are defined in subsection 1(1) of the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Information to be submitted

The Notice sets out the information that must be provided to the Minister 90 days before the day on which the substance nonadecane, 9-methylene-, mixed with 1-decene, dimers and trimers, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1000172-32-6, is used for a significant new activity. The Department of the Environment and the Department of Health will use the information submitted in the SNAN to conduct risk assessments within 90 days after the complete information is received.

The earlier assessment of the substance identified potential concerns associated with uses of the substance in consumer applications where vapour, mist or aerosol is released. This substance can potentially cause toxicity problems if inhaled. The SNAc Notice is issued to gather toxicity information in the event that the substance is used in consumer products intended to be released as vapour, mist or aerosol to ensure that the substance will undergo further assessment before significant new activities are undertaken.

The information requirements in the Notice relate to general information in respect of the substance, details surrounding its use, exposure information, and toxicity to human health. Some of the information requirements reference the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers).

Additional guidance on preparing a SNAN can be found in section 1.3 of the Guidelines for the Notification and Testing of New Substances: Chemicals and Polymers.

Transitional provision

A transitional provision is included in the Notice to facilitate compliance by persons who may already have imported or manufactured the substance up to 100 kg and started activities for the manufacture or the distribution for the resale of the products with the substance in concentrations that are greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight in the product matrix. The Notice comes into force immediately. However, if the substance is used in the manufacture or distribution for the resale of consumer products to which the CCPSA applies, or in a cosmetic as defined in the FDA, a threshold of more than or equal to 100 kg per calendar year applies and a concentration equal to or greater than 0.1% by weight applies for the period between the publication of the Notice and June 8, 2020. On June 9, 2020, the threshold for this significant new activity will be lowered to 0 g per calendar year and the concentration will remain greater than or equal to 0.1% by weight for the fabrication of consumer products subject to the CCPSA or cosmetic products as defined in the LAD, and 10 kg per calendar year and the concentration will remain at or above 0.1% by weight for the use of the substance for the distribution for resale.

Compliance

When assessing whether or not a substance is subject to SNAc provisions, a person is expected to make use of information in their possession or to which they may reasonably have access. This means information in any of the notifier’s offices worldwide or other locations where the notifier can reasonably have access to the information. For example, manufacturers are expected to have access to their formulations, while importers or users of a substance, mixture, or product are expected to have access to import records, usage information and the relevant safety data sheets (SDSs), formerly “material safety data sheets” (MSDSs). More details are contained in the Regulations Amending the New Substances Notification Regulations (Chemicals and Polymers) and the Export of Substances on the Export Control List Regulations for reference to this amendment.

Although an SDS is an important source of information on the composition of a product, it should be noted that the goal of the SDS is to protect the health of workers in the workplace from specific hazards of chemical products. Therefore, an SDS may not list all product ingredients that may be subject to a SNAc notice due to human health or environmental concerns. Any person requiring more detailed information on product composition is encouraged to contact their supplier.

If any information becomes available that reasonably supports the conclusion that the substance nonadecane, 9-methylene-, mixed with 1-decene, dimers and trimers, hydrogenated, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry No. 1000172-32-6, is toxic or capable of becoming toxic, the person who is in possession of or who has knowledge of the information and is involved in activities with the substance is obligated, under section 70 of the Act, to provide that information to the Minister without delay.

A company can submit a SNAN on behalf of its clients. For example, in cases where a person takes possession or control of a substance from another person, they may not be required to submit a SNAN, under certain conditions, if their activities were covered by an original SNAN submitted by the person from whom they obtained the substance. The Substances Management Advisory Note “Clarification in relation to the submission of Significant New Activity Notifications in application of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999” provides more detail on this subject.

Under section 86 of the Act, any person who transfers the physical possession or control of a substance subject to a SNAc Notice must notify all persons to whom the physical possession or control is transferred of the obligation to comply with the Notice, including the obligation to notify the Minister of any SNAc and to provide all the required information outlined above.

A pre-notification consultation (PNC) is recommended for notifiers who wish to consult with the program during the planning or preparation of their SNAN to discuss any questions or concerns they have about the prescribed information and test plans.

Where a person has questions concerning their obligations to comply with a Notice, believes they may be out of compliance, or would like to request a PNC, they are encouraged to discuss their particular circumstances with the program by contacting the Substances Management Information Line (eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca [email], 1-800‑567‑1999 [toll-free in Canada], and 819‑938‑3232 [outside of Canada]).

The Act is enforced in accordance with the publicly available Compliance and Enforcement Policy for the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. In instances of non-compliance, consideration is given to factors such as the nature of the alleged violation, potential harm, intent, and history of compliance.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication after screening assessment of copper and its compounds, including those specified on the Domestic Substances List and those identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas a summary of the draft screening assessment conducted on copper and its compounds pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

Whereas 26 substances identified in Annex II below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Act or were otherwise identified as priorities based on other human health concerns, and 11 substances identified in Annex II below are substances identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List;

And whereas it is proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to recommend to Her Excellency the Governor in Council that copper and its compounds be added to Schedule 1 of the Act.

Notice is furthermore given that the ministers have released a risk management scope document for copper and its compounds to initiate discussions with stakeholders on risk management actions being considered for copper and its compounds.

Public comment period

Any person may, within 60 days after publication of this notice, file with the Minister of the Environment written comments on the measure the ministers propose to take and on the scientific considerations on the basis of which the measure is proposed. More information regarding the scientific considerations may be obtained from the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website. All comments must cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice and be sent to the Executive Director, Program Development and Engagement Division, Department of the Environment, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H3, by fax to 819‑938‑5212, or by email to eccc.substances.eccc@canada.ca. Comments can also be submitted to the Minister of the Environment using the online reporting system available through Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Single Window.

In accordance with section 313 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, any person who provides information in response to this notice may submit with the information a request that it be treated as confidential.

Jacqueline Gonçalves
Director General
Science and Risk Assessment Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

Gwen Goodier
Acting Director General
Industrial Sectors, Chemicals and Waste Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of the Environment

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX I

Summary of the draft screening assessment of copper and its compounds

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of copper and its compounds. Twenty-six of these substances were identified as priorities for assessment, as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. Eleven additional substances were identified for further consideration following prioritization of the Revised In Commerce List. This draft screening assessment focuses on the copper moiety; therefore, it considers copper in its elemental form; copper-containing substances; and copper released in dissolved, solid, or particulate form. This screening assessment therefore considers copper-containing substances beyond those identified as priorities for assessment.

Copper is naturally occurring in the environment and moves through various compartments by geochemical and biogeochemical cycling. Anthropogenic activities may contribute copper to the environment during the production of metallic copper or other copper-containing substances (e.g. mining, extracting, processing of ores, and smelting and refining), through other industrial activities (e.g. wastewater treatment), and through the use of products containing copper. This assessment considers combined exposure to the copper moiety from natural or anthropogenic sources, whether it is present in environmental compartments, food, or products. All substances that have the potential to dissolve, dissociate, or degrade to release copper through various transformation pathways can potentially contribute to the exposure of living organisms to bioavailable forms of copper.

Pursuant to CEPA section 71 notices, information was reported for 19 copper substances that were manufactured or imported above the reporting threshold of 100 kg per year in either 2011 or 2012 to 2015. No information above the reporting threshold was received for 15 additional copper substances that were surveyed. A total of over 10 000 000 kg was reported for both manufacturing and imported quantities. These substances are used in a wide variety of products and applications, including arts, crafts and hobby materials; automotive care; building and construction materials; cosmetics; children’s toys; cleaning products; electrical and electronic uses; food packaging; ink, toner and colourants; natural health products and drugs; agricultural products (non-pesticidal); paints and coatings; pest control substances; plastics; textiles; and other industrial and commercial uses.

The ecological exposure assessment focuses on the top sectors of activity as determined by the greatest quantities of copper released to the environment. Specifically, exposure scenarios were developed for the metal mining, base metal smelting, and wastewater treatment sectors.

The ecological effects assessment focuses on the dissolved fraction of copper, as this is typically better correlated with ecotoxicity. Where possible, toxicity modifying factors (i.e. hardness, pH, dissolved organic carbon, and temperature) were considered since the portion of dissolved copper is dependent on these water chemistry conditions.

The outcomes of the ecological risk characterization for the metal mining, base metal smelting, and wastewater treatment sectors indicate ecological risks in the aquatic compartment. This was determined by using a weight-of-evidence approach, including a comparison of the predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) to the predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) to generate risk quotients (RQs), and by assessing the frequency and magnitude of RQs exceeding a value of one.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this draft screening assessment, there is a risk of harm to the environment from copper and its compounds. It is proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) of CEPA, as they are entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity. However, it is proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

Copper is an essential element for human health, yet elevated intake may result in adverse health effects. In instances of excess chronic oral ingestion of copper, liver damage has been observed as the principal health effect. For that reason, guidelines exist to provide limits against excess copper intake in the general population. In a human volunteer study, no effects were observed up to doses of 10 mg per day for 12 weeks. This study is the basis for the upper tolerable intake level (UL) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) for North American populations. The IOM UL is also the basis for limits of copper in multi-vitamin/mineral supplements and supplemented foods, as well as the basis for the copper soil quality guideline for copper and the toxicological reference values (TRVs) developed by Health Canada under the Federal Contaminated Site Risk Assessment Program. With respect to exposure via the inhalation route, transient acute respiratory effects were identified in laboratory animals after a single inhaled high dose of copper. Repeat doses resulted in signs of inflammation of the lungs; however, all effects were reversible once dosing ended.

All Canadians can be exposed to copper through environmental media, food, drinking water and products available to consumers. Food is the main source of intake, and toddlers have the highest intake when normalized by body weight. To characterize risk, estimates of daily exposure from environmental media, food and drinking water were derived for the general population and for those living near point sources of release (e.g. mines, smelters and refineries). These estimates were compared to the IOM UL, and there were no exceedances for either group. Exposure estimates were also derived for the general population from the use of products available to consumers. Oral exposure estimates to copper from the use of arts and craft products, children’s toys, cosmetics, and natural health products did not exceed the IOM UL. There is also potential for inhalation exposure to copper in airborne particulate matter for the general population and for those living near point sources of release. Measured air concentrations were compared to the levels at which inhalation-specific health effects were seen, and margins of exposure were considered adequate for copper in particulate matter. Inhalation exposure scenarios from the use of products available to consumers were also derived. Margins of exposure for inhalation of copper from cleaning products, cosmetics, and spray paints were considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases. On the basis of the information presented in this draft screening assessment, it is proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Proposed conclusion

It is proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds meet one or more of the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

It is also proposed to conclude that copper and its compounds meet the persistence criteria, but not the bioaccumulation criteria as set out in the Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations of CEPA.

The draft screening assessment and the risk management scope document for these substances are available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

ANNEX II

Substance identity information for copper and its compounds

CAS RN table 1 note *

Domestic Substances List (DSL) or Revised In Commerce List (R-ICL) name

Inventory

137-29-1

Copper, bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S )-, (SP-4-1)-

DSL

142-71-2

Acetic acid, copper(2+) salt

DSL

527-09-3

Copper, bis(D-gluconato-o1,o2)-

DSL

866-82-0

1,2,3-Propanetricarbonxylic acid, 2-hydroxy-, copper (2+) salt (1 :2)

R-ICL

1111-67-7

Thiocyanic acid, copper(1+) salt

DSL

1317-38-0

Copper oxide

DSL

1317-39-1

Copper oxide

DSL

1317-40-4

Copper sulfide

DSL

1319-53-5

Malachite

R-ICL

1328-51-4

C.I. Solvent Blue 38

DSL

1328-53-6 table 1 note a

C.I. Pigment Green 7

DSL

1337-20-8

Chlorophyllins, copper potassium salt

R-ICL

1338-02-9

Naphthenic acids, copper salts

DSL

1344-73-6

Sulfuric acid, copper salt, basic

DSL

3251-23-8

Nitric acid, copper(2+) salt

DSL

7440-50-8

Copper

DSL

7447-39-4

Copper chloride

DSL

7492-68-4

Carbonic acid, copper salt

R-ICL

7681-65-4

Copper iodide

DSL

7758-89-6

Copper chloride

DSL

7758-98-7

Sulfuric acid copper(2+) salt (1:1)

DSL

7798-23-4

Phosphoric acid, copper(2+) salt (2:3)

DSL

11006-34-1

Cuprate(3-), [18-carboxy-20-(carboxymethyl)-8-ethenyl-13-ethyl-2,3-dihydro-3,7,12,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-2-propanoato(5-)-N21,N22,N23,N24]-, trisodium, [SP-4-2-(2S-tra table 1 note * ns)]-

DSL

12222-04-7

Direct Blue 199

R-ICL

20427-59-2

Copper hydroxide

DSL

22205-45-4

Copper sulfide

DSL

22221-10-9

Hexanoic acid, 2-ethyl-, copper salt

DSL

26317-27-1

Cuprate(3-), [(7S,8S)-3-carboxy-5-(carboxymethyl)-13-ethenyl-18-ethyl-7,8-dihydro-2,8,12,17-tetramethyl-21H,23H-porphine-7-propanoato(5-)-.kappa.N21,.kappa.N22,.kappa.N23,.kappa.N24]-, trihydrogen, (SP-4-2)-

R-ICL

28302-36-5

Cuprate(3-), [(7S,8S)-3-carboxy-5-(carboxymethyl)-13-ethenyl-18-ethyl-17-formyl-7,8-dihydro-2,8,12-trimethyl-21H,23H-porphine-7-propanoato(5-)-.kappa.N21,.kappa.N22,.kappa.N23,.kappa.N24]-, sodium (1:3), (SP-4-2)-

R-ICL

68084-48-0

Neodecanoic acid, copper(2+) salt

DSL

68512-13-0 table 1 note a

Copper, [29H,31H-phthalocyaninato(2-)N29,N30,N31,N32]-, brominated chlorinated

DSL

68987-63-3 table 1 note a

Copper, [29H,31H-phthalocyaninato(2-)-N29,N30,N31,N32]-, chlorinated

DSL

105883-51-0

Copper, bis[N-acetyl-.kappa.O)-L-methioninato-.kappa.O]-

R-ICL

131044-77-4

Copper, N-acetyl-L-tyrosine hydroxy-terminated (S)- [2-(acetylamino)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-oxopropoxy] Me siloxanes

R-ICL

131044-78-5

Copper, hydroxyl-terminated Me (S)-[[5-oxo-2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]oxy] siloxanes 5-oxo-L-proline complexes

R-ICL

147550-61-6

Copper carbonate hydroxide

R-ICL

CDSL 10024-7 table 1 note b

Metal alkyldithiophosphates

DSL

Table 1 note(s)

Table 1 Note *

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table 1 note * referrer

Table 1 Note a

The substances bearing these CAS RNs did not meet the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA; they were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

Table 1 Note b

CDSL (Confidential DSL) accession No. 10024-7.

Return to table 1 note b referrer

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of seven hydrocarbon-based substances specified on the Domestic Substances List (paragraphs 68(b) and (c) or subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas spent sulphidic caustic, montan wax, and montan-wax fatty acids identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne (acetylene), and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters pursuant to paragraphs 68(b) and (c), and on spent sulphidic caustic, montan wax, and montan-wax fatty acids pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these substances at this time.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment for seven hydrocarbon-based substances

Pursuant to section 68 or 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of seven hydrocarbon-based substances. Substances in this group were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA or were considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns. Five of the substances were originally referred to as the Petroleum Concise Screening Assessment under the Chemical Management Plan, while two montan-wax fatty acids (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers [CAS RNs footnote 4] 68476-03-9 and 73138-45-1) were moved from the Fatty Acids and Salts Group. One additional substance, which was originally in the Petroleum Concise Screening Assessment, will have its proposed decision provided in a separate report. footnote 5 The CAS RN, the Domestic Substances List (DSL) name and the common name of the substances are listed in the table below.

Seven hydrocarbon-based substances

CAS RN

DSL name

Common name

64742-40-1 table 2 note a

Neutralizing agents (petroleum), spent sodium hydroxide

Spent sulphidic caustic

68477-26-9 table 2 note a, table 2 note b

Wastes, petroleum

Slop oil

68956-70-7 table 2 note a, table 2 note b

Petroleum products, C5-12, reclaimed, wastewater treatment

Naphtha waste

74-86-2 table 2 note b

Ethyne

Ethyne (Acetylene)

8002-53-7 table 2 note a

Montan wax

Montan wax

68476-03-9 table 2 note a

Fatty acids, montan-wax

Montan-wax fatty acids

73138-45-1 table 2 note a, table 2 note b

Fatty acids, montan-wax, ethylene esters

Montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters

Table 2 note(s)

Table 2 Note a

The substance bearing this CAS RN is a UVCB (unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products, or biological materials).

Return to table 2 note a referrer

Table 2 Note b

This substance was not identified under subsection 73(1) of CEPA, but was included in this screening assessment as it was considered a priority on the basis of other human health concerns.

Return to table 2 note b referrer

This screening assessment contains three waste products, one substance (ethyne) that is similar to petroleum hydrocarbons and may be derived from petroleum substances, a lignite coal-derived wax and two of its fatty acids and fatty acid ester components that are used in a similar manner as the petrolatum petroleum waxes. The seven substances are addressed individually within this assessment. Based upon low ecological and human health exposure patterns or low ecological and human health hazard potential, quantitative exposure characterization, informed by the collection of manufacturing and import data, was not required.

Spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil and naphtha waste are by-products or wastes generated by the petroleum industry that are recycled or reclaimed to a large extent by refineries. No information on the quantity of these petroleum refinery wastes generated in Canada was identified; however, they are all high production volume substances in the United States. Portions of these wastes that are not recycled, reclaimed or sold to industrial users are either treated and disposed of, or shipped off-site to provincial and territorial licenced waste disposal facilities, where they may be further processed. They are not used in products available to consumers and are not expected to be released to the environment. Accordingly, exposure to the environment and to the general population from these wastes is not expected and the potential risk to the environment and human health is expected to be low.

Ethyne is produced from the conversion of methane under high heat in the presence of oxygen. Ethyne is also manufactured by reacting calcium carbide and water, or may be incidentally produced as a co-product during the cracking of natural gas liquids, naphtha, or gas oil. No information on the quantity of ethyne manufactured in Canada was identified; however, it is a high production volume chemical in the United States. The primary uses of ethyne are as a raw material for the production of other chemicals (e.g. 1,4-butanediol, acetylenic alcohols, ethyl and methyl vinyl ethers) in closed systems, followed by use as a fuel for welding, cutting, and heat treating metals. On the basis of its use in closed industrial environments or as a fuel operating in high temperature combustion conditions, exposure to the environment and to the general population is expected to be minimal. On the basis of its minimal exposure to the environment and to the general population, as well as its low estimated ecotoxicity and human toxicity, the potential risk to the environment and human health from ethyne is expected to be low.

Montan wax is a solid wax originating from lignite coal. It has similar properties and uses to the petroleum wax petrolatum, but has a non-petroleum source. In addition to crude montan wax, this assessment considers refined (bleached or deresined) montan wax and its components montan-wax fatty acids, and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters. Refined montan wax is used in products available to consumers, including cosmetics, automotive products, household cleaning products and food packaging materials. Montan wax is expected to be released to wastewater from these uses, and subsequently partition to sediments and biosolids, due to its low water solubility. Experimental and modelled toxicity data indicate that montan wax is considered to be of low ecological hazard. In addition, repeat dose animal studies indicate low toxicity to humans. Given the low environmental and human health hazards associated with these substances, the potential risk to the environment and human health from them is considered to be low.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters. It is concluded that sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that spent sulphidic caustic, slop oil, naphtha waste, ethyne, montan wax, montan-wax fatty acids, and montan-wax fatty acids ethylene esters do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these substances is available on the Canada.ca (Chemical Substances) website.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Adair, Julie

  • Government of Canada
  • Commissioner to administer oaths

2019-412

DeWitt-Van Oosten, The Hon. M. Joyce

  • Court of Appeal for British Columbia
  • Justice of Appeal
  • Court of Appeal of Yukon
  • Judge

2019-400

Federal Court

  • Judges
 

Federal Court of Appeal

 
  • Judges ex officio
 
  • McHaffie, Nicholas

2019-399

  • Pamel, Panagiotis

2019-398

Federal Court of Appeal or Federal Court

  • Commissioners to administer oaths
  • Dobrota, Svetlana
  • Fan, Joyce
  • Fisher, Mélissa Marie Aline Lina
  • Lalonde, Kimberly
  • Mantler, Sarah
  • Morin, François D.
  • Petranski, Alexandre Peter

2019-431

Namiesniowski, Kristina

  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • President

2019-383

Superior Court of Justice of Ontario, a member of the Family Court branch

  • Judges
 

Court of Appeal for Ontario

 
  • Judges ex officio
 
  • Breithaupt Smith, Jennifer

2019-405

  • Kril, Mary Anne

2019-403

  • Piccoli, Diana

2019-404

Tax Court of Canada

  • Commissioners to administer oaths
  • Andone, Maria Karina
  • Alam, Micheline
  • Canelon de Muller, Sonia
  • Dobrota, Svetlana
  • Fan, Joyce
  • MacNeil, Don
  • Mantler, Sarah
  • McNicoll, Melissa

2019-432

May 10, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Designation as fingerprint examiner

Pursuant to subsection 667(5) of the Criminal Code, I hereby designate the following person of the Winnipeg Police Service as a fingerprint examiner:

Jason Dee

Ottawa, May 2, 2019

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order Respecting Flooded Areas

Whereas the Minister of Transport is of the opinion that the annexed Interim Order Respecting Flooded Areas is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

Whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 35.1(1) footnote c, paragraphs 136(1)(f) and (h) footnote d, 207(f) and 244(f) footnote e, (g) and (h) footnote f of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote g;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1) footnote h of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote i, makes the annexed Interim Order Respecting Flooded Areas.

Ottawa, April 27, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order Respecting Flooded Areas

Interpretation

Definitions

1 (1) The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

Interpretation

(2) Unless the context requires otherwise, all other words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Regulations.

Prohibition

Operation of vessels

2 No person shall operate a vessel in any of the following waters:

Exception

Persons

3 Section 2 does not apply to vessels operated by the following persons:

Enforcement

Enforcement officers

4 For the purpose of ensuring compliance with sections 2 and 3, the persons or classes of persons set out in the table to this section are appointed or specified as enforcement officers.

TABLE

Item

Column 1

Persons or classes of persons

Column 2

Geographic location

1

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Ontario and Quebec

2

A member of any harbour or river police force

Ontario and Quebec

3

A member of any provincial, county or municipal police force

Ontario and Quebec

4

A marine safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

5

A pleasure craft safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

6

A person employed as park warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Parks Act

Ontario and Quebec

7

A person employed as marine conservation area warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act

Ontario and Quebec

8

A person employed as conservation officer by the National Capital Commission

National Capital Region

9

A First Nations Constable appointed under the Ontario Police Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. P.15

Ontario

Powers

5 An enforcement officer may

Designated Provision

Designation

6 (1) The provision set out in column I of the schedule is designated as a provision the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 229 to 242 of the Act.

Penalties

(2) The range of penalties set out in column II of the schedule is the range of penalties payable in respect of a contravention of the designated provision set out in column I.

SCHEDULE

(Subsections 6(1) and (2))

Designated Provision

Column I

Designated Provision

Column II

Range of Penalties ($)

 

Individual

Section 2

250 to 5,000

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Flooded Areas

Whereas the Minister of Transport is of the opinion that the annexed Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Flooded Areas is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

Whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 35.1(1) footnote j, paragraphs 136(1)(f) and (h) footnote k, 207(f) and 244(f) footnote l, (g) and (h) footnote m of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote n;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1) footnote o of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote p, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Flooded Areas.

Ottawa, April 30, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 2 Respecting Flooded Areas

Interpretation

Definitions

1 (1) The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

Interpretation

(2) Unless the context requires otherwise, all other words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Regulations.

Prohibition

Operation of vessels

2 No person shall operate a vessel in any of the following waters:

Exception

Persons

3 Section 2 does not apply to vessels operated by the following persons:

Enforcement

Enforcement officers

4 For the purpose of ensuring compliance with section 2, the persons or classes of persons set out in the table to this section are appointed or specified as enforcement officers.

TABLE

Item

Column 1

Persons or classes of persons

Column 2

Geographic location

1

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Ontario and Quebec

2

A member of any harbour or river police force

Ontario and Quebec

3

A member of any provincial, county or municipal police force

Ontario and Quebec

4

A marine safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

5

A pleasure craft safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

6

A person employed as park warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Parks Act

Ontario and Quebec

7

A person employed as marine conservation area warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act

Ontario and Quebec

8

A person employed as conservation officer by the National Capital Commission

National Capital Region

9

A First Nations Constable appointed under the Ontario Police Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. P.15

Ontario

Powers

5 An enforcement officer may

Designated Provision

Designation

6 (1) The provision set out in column I of the schedule is designated as a provision the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 229 to 242 of the Act.

Penalties

(2) The range of penalties set out in column II of the schedule is the range of penalties payable in respect of a contravention of the designated provision set out in column I.

Repeal

7 The Interim Order Respecting Flooded Areas, made on April 27, 2019, is repealed.

SCHEDULE

(Subsections 6(1) and (2))

Designated Provision

Column I

Designated Provision

Column II

Range of Penalties ($)

 

Individual

Section 2

250 to 5,000

INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA

RADIOCOMMUNICATION ACT

Notice No. DGSO-002-19 — Consultation on the Spectrum Licence Renewal Process for Non-Auctioned Broadband Radio Services (BRS) Licences

The intent of this notice is to announce a public consultation through Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada’s (ISED) document entitled Consultation on the Spectrum Licence Renewal Process for Non-Auctioned Broadband Radio Services (BRS) Licences. Through the release of this document, ISED is initiating a consultation on the renewal process for spectrum licences in the 2500 MHz band (2500-2690 MHz) for broadband radio services (BRS), specifically, converted Multipoint Communications System (MCS) and Multipoint Distribution Services (MDS) licences that expire on March 31, 2021.

ISED seeks comments on all aspects related to the renewal of these licences, along with supporting rationale.

Submitting comments

Interested parties should submit their comments no later than May 30, 2019. Respondents are asked to provide their comments in electronic format (Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF) by email at ic.spectrumoperations-operationsduspectre.ic@canada.ca. Soon after the close of the comment period, all comments will be posted on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website. ISED will also provide interested parties with the opportunity to reply to comments from other parties. Reply comments will be accepted no later than June 14, 2019.

Written submissions should be addressed to

Senior Director
Spectrum Management Operations Branch
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
235 Queen Street, 6th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H5

All submissions should cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, the publication date, the title and the reference number of this notice (DGSO-002-19).

Obtaining copies

Copies of this notice and of documents referred to herein are available electronically on ISED’s Spectrum Management and Telecommunications website.

Official versions of notices can be viewed on the Canada Gazette website.

Eric Parsons
Senior Director
Spectrum Management Operations Branch

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Vice-Chairperson

Canada Science and Technology Museum

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (British Columbia/Yukon)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Chairperson

The Federal Bridge Corporation Limited

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Deputy Chief Commissioner

First Nations Tax Commission

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member

International Authority

 

Commissioner and Chairperson

International Joint Commission

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Vice-Chairperson

Invest in Canada Hub

 

Chief Executive Officer

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

Library and Archives of Canada

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Member

Payment in Lieu of Taxes Dispute Advisory Panel

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson (all streams)

Social Security Tribunal of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada