Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 23: GOVERNMENT NOTICES

June 8, 2019

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Order 2019-87-06-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a, the Minister of the Environment has added the substance referred to in the annexed Order to the Domestic Substances List footnote b;

Therefore, the Minister of the Environment, pursuant to subsection 87(5) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 footnote a, makes the annexed Order 2019-87-06-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List.

Gatineau, May 22, 2019

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Order 2019-87-06-02 Amending the Non-domestic Substances List

Amendment

1 Part I of the Non-domestic Substances List footnote 1 is amended by deleting the following:

68527-43-5

Coming into Force

2 This Order comes into force on the day on which Order 2019-87-06-01 Amending the Domestic Substances List comes into force.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Publication of final decision after screening assessment of three substances of the Heterocycles Group specified on the Domestic Substances List (subsection 77(6) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999)

Whereas the three substances of the Heterocycles Group identified in the annex below are substances identified under subsection 73(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999;

Whereas a summary of the screening assessment conducted on the substances pursuant to section 74 of the Act is annexed hereby;

And whereas it is concluded that the substances do not meet any of the criteria set out in section 64 of the Act,

Notice therefore is hereby given that the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health (the ministers) propose to take no further action on these three substances at this time under section 77 of the Act.

Catherine McKenna
Minister of the Environment

Ginette Petitpas Taylor
Minister of Health

ANNEX

Summary of the screening assessment of the Heterocycles Group

Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment of three of seven substances referred to collectively under the Chemicals Management Plan as the Heterocycles Group. Four substances were identified as priorities for assessment as they met the categorization criteria under subsection 73(1) of CEPA: the three substances listed in the table below and the substance 2-imidazolidinethione (commonly known as ethylene thiourea [ETU]). ETU was included in the draft screening assessment for the Heterocycles Group published on November 11, 2017. However, activities associated with the presence of ETU as a metabolite and a residual in select pesticides are ongoing; therefore, the CEPA conclusion for this substance will be provided in a separate screening assessment. Three of the seven substances were subsequently determined to be of low concern through other approaches, and decisions for these substances are provided in a separate report. footnote 2 Accordingly, this screening assessment addresses the three substances listed in the table below. These three substances will hereinafter be referred to as the Heterocycles Group.

Substances in the Heterocycles Group

CAS RN table 1 note a

Domestic Substances List (DSL) name

Common name

100-97-0

1,3,5,7-Tetraazatricyclo[3.3.1.13,7] decane

Methenamine

110-91-8

Tetrahydro-1,4-oxazine

Morpholine

4174-09-8

3H-Pyrazol-3-one, 2,4-dihydro-4-[(5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene]-5-methyl-2-phenyl-

N/A

N/A: Not applicable

Table 1 note(s)

Table 1 Note a

The Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS RN) is the property of the American Chemical Society, and any use or redistribution, except as required in supporting regulatory requirements and/or for reports to the Government of Canada when the information and the reports are required by law or administrative policy, is not permitted without the prior, written permission of the American Chemical Society.

Return to table 1 note a referrer

In 2011, between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg of methenamine were reported to be manufactured in Canada, and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg were reported to be imported into Canada during the same calendar year according to information submitted pursuant to a CEPA section 71 notice. The largest reported use of methenamine is as a cross-linking agent in phenolic and urea formaldehyde resins and in rubber. Methenamine is consumed during this process. Another reported use is as a chemical intermediate in nitration reactions for explosives production and in the production of fuel tablets. Cosmetics may also contain methenamine at low levels as a preservative. Food packaging materials may also contain methenamine.

In 2011, between 1 000 and 10 000 kg of morpholine were reported to be manufactured in Canada, and between 100 000 and 1 000 000 kg were reported to be imported into Canada during the same calendar year according to information submitted pursuant to a CEPA section 71 notice. Reported primary uses of morpholine include use as an intermediate in the production of rubber accelerators, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, optical brighteners, antioxidants and as an industrial solvent. It is also used in closed water or steam systems to prevent corrosion, as an oil field production chemical and as a solvent and emulsifier in the preparation of wax coatings for fruits and vegetables. Morpholine has also been identified as a component in the manufacture of some food packaging materials (e.g. interior coatings).

In 2011, between 1 000 and 10 000 kg of the substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8 were reported to be imported into Canada according to information submitted pursuant to a CEPA section 71 notice. This substance was reported to be used as a colourant for plastic materials and articles, varnishes and coatings. It has been identified for use as a colourant in polystyrene, polycarbonate and polyethylene terephthalate food packaging materials.

The ecological risks of the substances in the Heterocycles Group were characterized using the ecological risk classification of organic substances (ERC) approach, which is a risk-based approach that employs multiple metrics for both hazard and exposure with weighted consideration of multiple lines of evidence for determining risk classification. Hazard profiles are established primarily on the basis of mode of toxic action, chemical reactivity, food web–derived internal toxicity thresholds, bioavailability, and chemical and biological activity. Metrics considered in the exposure profiles include potential emission rate, overall persistence, and long-range transport potential. A risk matrix is used to assign a low, moderate or high level of potential concern for substances on the basis of their hazard and exposure profiles. The ERC identified the three substances in the Heterocycles Group as having low potential to cause ecological harm.

Considering all available lines of evidence presented in this screening assessment, there is a low risk of harm to the environment from methenamine, morpholine and the substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8. It is concluded that methenamine, morpholine and the substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(a) or (b) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that have or may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment or its biological diversity or that constitute or may constitute a danger to the environment on which life depends.

General population exposure to methenamine can occur from the use of cosmetics when it is used as a preservative, when it is used in products available to consumers, and from its use in food packaging materials. For the general population, margins of exposure comparing effect levels for the critical health effects and the estimates of methenamine exposure are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

Exposure of the general population to morpholine is expected to be limited to the use of a small number of products available to consumers, primarily home and auto polishes and waxes and related auto care products. Morpholine may also be added to some wax coating compounds used on fresh produce, such as apples. There is therefore a potential for dietary exposure to trace levels of morpholine when coated produce is consumed. In the case of food packaging use, morpholine is not a significant source of dietary exposure. There is also the potential for exposure from disinfectant sprays. Health Canada (2002) previously conducted a safety assessment of the use of morpholine in wax coatings used on apples and determined that such use did not present a risk to humans. For the general population, the margins of exposure between morpholine exposure and the critical effect levels identified from laboratory studies are considered adequate to address uncertainties in the health effects and exposure databases.

The substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8 may be used as a colourant in food packaging materials though it is not expected to migrate from the packaging material. As exposure is considered to be negligible, risk to human health is considered to be low.

On the basis of the information presented in this screening assessment, it is concluded that methenamine, morpholine and the substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8 do not meet the criteria under paragraph 64(c) of CEPA, as they are not entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health.

Conclusion

It is concluded that methenamine, morpholine and the substance bearing CAS RN 4174-09-8 do not meet the criteria set out in section 64 of CEPA.

The screening assessment for these three substances is available on the Canada.ca website (Chemical Substances).

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT, 1999

Final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for copper

Pursuant to subsection 55(3) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Minister of Health hereby gives notice of a final guideline for Canadian drinking water quality for copper. The technical document for this guideline is available on the Water Quality website. This document underwent a public consultation period of 60 days in 2018 and was updated to take into consideration the comments received.

May 27, 2019

David Morin
Director General
Safe Environments Directorate

On behalf of the Minister of Health

ANNEX

Guideline

A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 2 mg/L (2 000 µg/L) is established for total copper in drinking water, based on a sample of water taken at the tap. The aesthetic objective (AO) for total copper in drinking water is 1 mg/L (1 000 µg/L).

Executive summary

Copper is present in tap water principally as a result of leaching from copper-containing components of distribution and plumbing systems. Copper has been, and continues to be, broadly used in drinking water applications, including in household pipes and in fittings.

This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with copper in drinking water. It assesses new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology in order to propose a MAC that is protective of human health, measurable and achievable by municipal and residential scale treatment technologies. Based on this review, the drinking water guideline for total copper in drinking is a MAC of 2 mg/L (2 000 µg/L) and an AO of 1 mg/L (1 000 µg/L) based on samples taken at the tap. The MAC is developed based on bottle-fed infants (aged zero to six months), the most sensitive sub-population, and is intended to protect all Canadians.

Health effects

Copper is an essential element in humans. Copper deficiency may cause several health effects, but is not expected to be a concern in Canada, based on copper intake from food. The U.S. National Academy of Medicine (formerly called the Institute of Medicine) has established recommended daily allowances of 900 µg/day for adults and 340–890 µg/day for children, as well as tolerable upper intake levels of 10 000 µg/day for adults and between 1 000 and 8 000 µg/day for children.

International agencies have determined that the data available on copper are not sufficient to classify it with respect to carcinogenicity. Short-term exposure to very high levels of copper may result in effects in the gastrointestinal tract (nausea, pain and vomiting, diarrhea). Long-term effects are less well documented; current evidence indicates that, in the general population, chronic exposure to very high levels of copper may lead to effects in the liver and kidney. The MAC was developed based on bottle-fed infants (aged zero to six months) and is considered to be protective of all Canadians for any health effects, both short-term and longer-term.

Aesthetic considerations

The presence of copper can affect the taste of the water and cause the staining of laundry and plumbing fixtures at levels below the MAC. Although there are no adverse effects associated with such levels, they may affect the acceptability of the water by consumers. Although the AO for copper in drinking water is 1 mg/L (1 000 µg/L), some individuals can readily perceive copper at levels below the AO. Nevertheless, corrosion control practices should target the MAC and not the elimination of aesthetic concerns, as this could jeopardize other water quality priorities such as lead control, especially if changes are made without consideration to the water quality impacts. Utilities may choose to use the AO to trigger a site-specific or localized water quality or corrosion investigation.

Exposure

Copper occurs naturally in the Earth’s crust, either in mineral deposits or, less frequently, as a metal. Copper can enter water sources from natural processes, such as soil weathering, and human activities, such as agriculture, mining and manufacturing. The National Plumbing Code of Canada considers copper to be an acceptable material for service lines and plumbing systems. Consequently, copper in drinking water primarily results from the corrosion of copper-containing pipes and fittings in distribution and plumbing systems, depending on the chemistry of the water.

Canadians can be exposed to copper through its presence in food, drinking water, air, soil and consumer products. Although the most significant source of copper intake for the general population is food, the bioavailability of copper in drinking water may be greater than that in food. Based on the physical and chemical properties of copper, inhalation and dermal absorption of copper are not expected from exposure to drinking water.

Analysis and treatment

The establishment of a drinking water guideline must take into consideration the ability to measure the contaminant. There are several methods available for the analysis of total copper in drinking water. Based on the capacity of commercial laboratories in Canada, analytical methods are available to reliably measure total copper in drinking water below the MAC and AO. These methods should include sample preparation to ensure that they are able to detect total copper (i.e. both dissolved and particulate forms).

Copper levels in source water are typically very low. Although there are treatment technologies that can remove copper efficiently at the treatment plant, municipal treatment is not generally an effective strategy. This is because copper is an acceptable material for service lines and plumbing systems. However, in certain water qualities, copper may be released into drinking water from pipes, service lines and brass fittings. The treatment approach for copper is generally focused on corrosion control through approaches such as water quality adjustments and the use of corrosion inhibitors.

As the primary source of copper in drinking water is the leaching from plumbing and distribution system components, drinking water treatment devices offer an effective option at the residential level, although their use should not be considered to be a permanent solution. There are a number of certified residential treatment devices available that can remove copper from drinking water to below the MAC.

International considerations

Drinking water quality guidelines, standards and/or guidance from other national and international organizations may vary due to the age of the assessments as well as differing policies and approaches, including the choice of key study and the use of different consumption rates, body weights and allocation factors.

Various organizations have established values for copper in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has established a maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) and a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for copper in drinking water at 1.3 mg/L as well as a secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) [aesthetic] for copper at 1 mg/L. In addition, the U.S. EPA has established an action level of 1.3 mg/L in its treatment-based Lead and Copper Rule, though a revision of this rule is currently under way. The World Health Organization has established a provisional health-based guideline value of 2 mg/L for copper in drinking water, the European Union directive includes a parametric value of 2 mg/L, and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council has established two levels for copper: an aesthetic value of 1 mg/L and a health-based value of 2 mg/L.

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL

Appointments

Name and position

Order in Council

Butler, The Hon. Gillian D.

2019-520

Court of Appeal of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge of Appeal

 

Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge ex officio

 

Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta

 

Justices

 

Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Judges ex officio

 

Davidson, Kent H., Q.C.

2019-518

Feth, Kevin, Q.C.

2019-517

Price, Johanna C.

2019-519

Deschênes, Commander Julie Catherine

2019-591

Military judge

 

Immigration and Refugee Board

 

Full-time members

 

Pollock, Jennifer Mary

2019-537

Tremblay, Tammy

2019-536

Lalonde, Michel

2019-562

Parole Board of Canada

 

Part-time member

 

Nielsen, The Hon. Kenneth G.

2019-516

Associate Chief Judge of the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta, with the style and title of Associate Chief Justice of the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta and a Judge ex officio of the Court of Appeal of Alberta

 

Noel, Glen L. C., Q.C.

2019-521

Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge

 

Court of Appeal of Newfoundland and Labrador

 

Judge ex officio

 

Veterans Review and Appeal Board

 

Permanent members

 

Carrière, Patrice J. J.

2019-555

Robert, Alex

2019-553

Robertson, Tanya

2019-554

Weir, Leslie

2018-560

Library and Archives of Canada

 

Librarian and Archivist of Canada

 

May 31, 2019

Diane Bélanger
Official Documents Registrar

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

CRIMINAL CODE

Revocation of designation as counterfeit examiner

Pursuant to subsection 461(2) of the Criminal Code, I hereby revoke the designation of the following person of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a counterfeit examiner:

Michael Walker

Ottawa, May 21, 2019

Ellen Burack
Assistant Deputy Minister
Community Safety and Countering Crime Branch

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA MARINE ACT

Toronto Port Authority — Supplementary letters patent

WHEREAS letters patent were issued by the Minister of Transport (“Minister”) for the Toronto Port Authority (“Authority”), under the authority of the Canada Marine Act (“Act”), effective June 8, 1999;

WHEREAS section 2.2 of the letters patent sets out the place where the registered office of the Authority is located;

WHEREAS Schedule C of the letters patent sets out the real property, other than federal real property, held or occupied by the Authority;

WHEREAS, pursuant to subsection 46(2.1) of the Act, the Authority wishes to lease as lessee, the real property described below (“Real Property”);

WHEREAS the board of directors of the Authority has requested that the Minister issue supplementary letters patent

AND WHEREAS the Minister is satisfied that the amendments to the letters patent are consistent with the Act;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to subsection 9(1) of the Act, the letters patent are amended as follows:

ISSUED this 27th day of May, 2019.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Transport

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order for the Protection of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Waters of Southern British Columbia

Whereas the Minister of Transport is of the opinion that the annexed Interim Order for the Protection of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Waters of Southern British Columbia is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

And whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to paragraphs 35.1(1)(k) footnote c and 136(1)(f) footnote d and (h)footnote d of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote e;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1) footnote f of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote e, makes the annexed Interim Order for the Protection of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Waters of Southern British Columbia.

Ottawa, May 24, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order for the Protection of Killer Whales (Orcinus orca) in the Waters of Southern British Columbia

Interpretation

Definitions

1 The following definitions apply in this Interim Order.

Approach Distance Prohibition

Prohibition — vessels

2 As of June 1, 2019, a vessel, other than the following vessels, must not approach within 400 m of a killer whale in the waters described in Schedule 1:

Prohibition — persons

3 (1) As of June 1, 2019, a person operating or navigating a vessel, other than a vessel referred to in paragraphs 2(a) to (e), must not approach within 400 m of a killer whale in the waters described in Schedule 1.

Exceptions

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to the following persons:

Exception — participant in a whale-watching activity

(3) Despite subsection (1), persons participating in a commercial whale-watching activity organized by a person to whom an authorization was issued under subsection 4(1) may approach a killer whale, other than a Southern Resident killer whale, at a distance of between 200 m and 400 m in the waters described in Schedule 1 if an authorization under subsection 4(1) has been issued to the vessel being operated or navigated.

Authorization to approach between 200 m and 400 m

4 (1) Despite sections 2 and 3, the Minister may, in writing, authorize a vessel, or a person operating or navigating a vessel, to approach a killer whale, other than a Southern Resident killer whale, at a distance of between 200 m and 400 m for commercial whale-watching purposes in the waters described in Schedule 1 if the person or the vessel is subject to an agreement with the Minister related to whale watching that is intended to reduce the risk of physical and acoustic disturbance to Southern Resident killer whales.

Application

(2) Any person who owns or operates a business for commercial whale-watching or ecotourism purposes, or any person or organization acting on their behalf, may submit a request for an authorization under subsection (1) in respect of themselves, and a vessel that they own or operate.

Conditions of authorization

(3) An authorization issued under subsection (1) is subject to the condition that the authorization holder complies with measures respecting the protection of killer whales or a reduction of risk of disturbance to killer whales set out in the agreement with the Minister referred to in subsection (1) and to which the authorization holder is subject.

Amending conditions

(4) The Minister may add, amend or remove conditions, if the Minister considers it necessary to contribute to the protection of killer whales or the marine environment or to marine safety.

Obligation to have authorization on vessel

(5) An authorization issued under subsection (1) must be kept on board the vessel.

Suspension or revocation

(6) The Minister may suspend or revoke an authorization, and inform the authorization holder in writing, if

Interim Sanctuary Zones

Prohibition — vessels

5 As of June 1, 2019, a vessel, other than the following vessels, must not operate or navigate in the waters described in Schedule 2:

Prohibition — persons

6 (1) As of June 1, 2019, a person must not operate or navigate a vessel, other than a vessel referred to in paragraphs 5(a) to (f), in any waters described in Schedule 2.

Exceptions

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to the following persons:

Enforcement

Powers and duties

7 A marine safety inspector referred to in section 11 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 or a person or organization authorized to carry out inspections under section 12 of that Act may

Obligation to comply

8 A person or vessel must comply with a direction, a requirement or a prohibition referred to in section 7.

Cessation of Effect

October 31, 2019

9 This Interim Order ceases to have effect on October 31, 2019.

SCHEDULE 1

(Section 2 and subsections 3(1) and (3) and 4(1))

Waters Subject to Approach Distance Prohibition

(Southern Resident killer whale critical habitat)

1. Southern Georgia, Haro and Juan de Fuca Straits

The transboundary waters of Southern Georgia, Haro and Juan de Fuca Straits, described clockwise from the western boundary:

Western Boundary

48°29.68′N

48°40.02′N

124°44.31′W

124°50.68′W;

excluding waters north of the line joining (Sooke Inlet)

48°21.30′N

48°20.33′N

123°44.32′W

123°42.90′W;

excluding waters north of the line joining (Royal Roads, Esquimault Harbour, Victoria Harbour)

48°24.25′N

48°24.57′N

123°28.97′W

123°22.61′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (Cordova Channel and Sidney Channel)

48°29.69′N

48°36.12′N

123°18.61′W

123°18.51′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western half of Miners Channel and the waters west of Gooch Island)

48°37.04′N

48°39.70′N

123°18.49′W

123°17.72′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western half of Prevost Channel and Moresby Passage)

48°39.88′N

48°42.96′N

123°17.68′W

123°19.63′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western portion of Swanson Channel between Moresby Island and Prevost Island)

48°43.34′N

48°48.86′N

123°19.88′W

123°22.70′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western portion of Trincomali Channel between Prevost Island and Parker Island)

48°50.66′N

48°52.61′N

123°23.33′W

123°23.92′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western portion of Trincomali Channel between Parker Island and Galiano Island)

48°52.85′N

48°53.08′N

123°23.92′W

123°23.76′W;

excluding waters west of the line joining (western portion of southern Strait of Georgia)

48°54.28′N

48°55.39′N

49°00.00′N

49°10.39′N

49°13.58′N

123°20.67′W

123°21.98′W

123°18.88′W

123°22.82′W

123°21.97′W;

excluding waters north of the line joining (portion of southern Strait of Georgia)

49°13.58′N

49°14.00′N

49°14.18′N

49°13.79′N

123°21.97′W

123°21.09′W

123°19.22′W

123°17.21′W;

excluding waters north and east of the line joining (portion of southern Strait of Georgia)

49°13.79′N

49°12.87′N

49°09.01′N

49°03.39′N

49°03.47′N

123°17.21′W

123°15.75′W

123°16.48′W

123°09.24′W

123°08.48′W;

and bounded in the east and south by Point Roberts and the United States Border.

2. Southwestern Vancouver Island

The waters off Southwestern Vancouver Island, described counter-clockwise from the northern boundary:

Northern Boundary (Vancouver Island running southwest offshore)

48°59.70′N

48°41.72′N

125°40.15′W

126°17.88′W;

offshore Boundary

48°13.95′N

125°44.61′W;

waters adjacent to the United States Border

48°29.72′N

124°44.32′W;

waters adjacent to Southern Resident Killer Whale critical habitat in transboundary waters of southern Georgia, Haro and Juan de Fuca Straits

48°40.04′N

124°50.66′W;

and bounded by Vancouver Island to the Northwest boundary;

excluding waters north of the line joining (Nitinat Inlet)

48°40.05′N

48°40.13′N

124°50.99′W

124°51.30′W;

excluding waters northeast of the line joining Cape Beale and Amphitrite Point (Barkley Sound)

48°55.22′N

48°47.174′N

125°32.391′W

125°13.039′W.

SCHEDULE 2

(Section 5 and subsection 6(1))

Interim Sanctuary Zones

1. Saturna Island

The waters off Saturna Island bounded by a line:

commencing at

48°47.033′N

123°03.550′W

[North Boundary of East Point (shoreline)];

then to

48°47.300′N

123°03.000′W

[Tumbo Channel];

then to

48°47.666′N

123°02.416′W

[Northwest Corner (Boiling Reef)];

then to

48°47.550′N

123°02.000′W

[Northeast Corner (Boiling Reef)];

then to

48°46.933′N

123°02.666′W

[Boundary Pass];

then to

48°46.600′N

123°03.166′W

[Narvaez Bay Boundary Following the Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS)];

then to

48°46.450′N

123°03.650′W

[Narvaez Bay Boundary Following the TSS];

then to

48°46.300′N

123°04.200′W

[Southeast Corner (Narvaez Bay)];

then to

48°46.416′N

123°04.533′W

[Southwest Corner (Narvaez Bay)];

then to

48°46.766′N

123°03.916′W

[South Boundary of East Point (shoreline)].

2. Swiftsure Bank

The waters of Swiftsure Bank bounded by a line:

commencing at

48°34.000′N

125°06.000′W

[Northwest Boundary];

then to

48°34.000′N

124°54.200′W

[Northeast Boundary];

then to

48°32.100′N

124°49.518′W

[Southeast Boundary];

then to

48°32.100′N

125°01.843′W

[Southwest Boundary].

3. Pender Island

The waters off Pender Island bounded by a line:

commencing at

48°44.166′N

123°13.900′W

[Southeast Boundary (Wallace Point)];

then to

48°44.166′N

123°15.550′W

[Southwest Boundary (Swanson Channel)];

then to

48°46.050′N

123°19.516′W

[Northwest Boundary (Swanson Channel)];

then to

48°46.050′N

123°18.383′W

[Northeast Boundary (South of Thieves Bay)].

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Interim Order No. 4 Respecting Flooded Areas

Whereas the Minister of Transport is of the opinion that the annexed Interim Order No. 4 Respecting Flooded Areas is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment;

And whereas the provisions of the annexed Order may be contained in a regulation made pursuant to subsection 35.1(1) footnote g and paragraphs 136(1)(f) footnote h and (h)footnote h, 207(f) and 244(f) footnote i, (g) and (h) footnote j of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 footnote k;

Therefore, the Minister of Transport, pursuant to subsection 10.1(1) footnote l of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001footnote k, makes the annexed Interim Order No. 4 Respecting Flooded Areas.

Ottawa, May 24, 2019

Marc Garneau
Minister of Transport

Interim Order No. 4 Respecting Flooded Areas

Interpretation

Interpretation

1 Unless the context requires otherwise, words and expressions used in this Interim Order have the same meaning as in the Vessel Operation Restriction Regulations.

Prohibition

Operation of vessels

2 No person shall operate a vessel in the following waters:

Exception

Persons

3 Section 2 does not apply to vessels operated by any of the following persons:

Enforcement

Enforcement officers

4 For the purpose of ensuring compliance with section 2, the persons or classes of persons set out in the table to this section are appointed or specified as enforcement officers.

TABLE

Item

Column 1

Persons or Classes of Persons

Column 2

Geographic Location

1

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Ontario and Quebec

2

A member of any harbour or river police force

Ontario and Quebec

3

A member of any provincial, county or municipal police force

Ontario and Quebec

4

A marine safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

5

A pleasure craft safety inspector

Ontario and Quebec

6

A person employed as park warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Parks Act

Ontario and Quebec

7

A person employed as marine conservation area warden by Parks Canada and appointed under the Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act

Ontario and Quebec

8

A person employed as conservation officer by the National Capital Commission

National Capital Region

9

A First Nations Constable appointed under the Ontario Police Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. P.15

Ontario

Powers

5 An enforcement officer may

Designated Provision

Designation

6 (1) The provision set out in column 1 of the schedule is designated as a provision the contravention of which may be dealt with under and in accordance with the procedure set out in sections 229 to 242 of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

Penalties

(2) The range of penalties set out in column 2 of the schedule is the range of penalties payable in respect of a contravention of the designated provision set out in column 1.

Repeal

7 Interim Order No. 3 Respecting Flooded Areas, made on May 14, 2019, is repealed.

SCHEDULE

(Subsections 6(1) and (2))

Designated Provision

Column 1

Designated Provision

Column 2

Range of Penalties ($)

 

Individual

Section 2

250 to 5,000

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INSURANCE COMPANIES ACT

AWP Health & Life SA — Order to insure in Canada risks

Notice is hereby given of the issuance, pursuant to subsection 574(1) of the Insurance Companies Act, of an order to insure in Canada risks, effective May 2, 2019, authorizing AWP Health & Life SA, under the name, in English, AWP Health & Life SA, and, in French, AWP Santé & Vie SA, to insure in Canada risks within the classes of life insurance and accident and sickness insurance.

May 24, 2019

Jeremy Rudin
Superintendent of Financial Institutions

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE

Appointment opportunities

We know that our country is stronger — and our government more effective — when decision-makers reflect Canada’s diversity. The Government of Canada has implemented an appointment process that is transparent and merit-based, strives for gender parity, and ensures that Indigenous peoples and minority groups are properly represented in positions of leadership. We continue to search for Canadians who reflect the values that we all embrace: inclusion, honesty, fiscal prudence, and generosity of spirit. Together, we will build a government as diverse as Canada.

We are equally committed to providing a healthy workplace that supports one’s dignity, self-esteem and the ability to work to one’s full potential. With this in mind, all appointees will be expected to take steps to promote and maintain a healthy, respectful and harassment-free work environment.

The Government of Canada is currently seeking applications from diverse and talented Canadians from across the country who are interested in the following positions.

Current opportunities

The following opportunities for appointments to Governor in Council positions are currently open for applications. Every opportunity is open for a minimum of two weeks from the date of posting on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Position

Organization

Closing date

Chief Administrator

Administrative Tribunals Support Service of Canada

 

Chairperson

Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada

 

Chairperson and Director

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

 

Chairperson

Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology

 

Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson

Canada Industrial Relations Board

 

Chairperson

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Canada Lands Company Limited

 

Chairperson (joint federal Governor in Council and provincial Lieutenant Governor appointment)

Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board

 

Board Member (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chief Executive Officer (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Vice-Chairperson (Anticipatory)

Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization

 

Chairperson

Canadian Dairy Commission

 

Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and Director

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Lead Commissioner, Deputy Lead Commissioner and Commissioner

Canadian Energy Regulator

 

Pay Equity Commissioner

Canadian Human Rights Commission

 

Chairperson

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

 

Permanent Member

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

 

Regional Member (British Columbia/Yukon)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Regional Member (Quebec)

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

 

Chairperson and Member

Canadian Statistics Advisory Council

 

President (Chief Executive Officer)

Canadian Tourism Commission

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Defense Construction (1951) Limited

 

Chairperson

Farm Credit Canada

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

Farm Credit Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson

Farm Products Council of Canada

 

Commissioner

Financial Consumer Agency of Canada

 

Chairperson

First Nations Financial Management Board

 

Director

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation

 

Director (Federal)

Hamilton Port Authority

 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Corporate Security Officer

House of Commons

 

Member (appointment to roster)

International Trade and International Investment Dispute Settlement Bodies

 

Member

National Capital Commission

 

Government Film Commissioner

National Film Board

 

President

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

 

Auditor General of Canada

Office of the Auditor General

 

Chief Accessibility Officer (Anticipatory)

Office of the Chief Accessibility Officer

 

Ombudsperson

Office of the Ombudsperson for National Defence and Canadian Forces

 

Director (Federal)

Oshawa Port Authority

 

Chairperson

Pacific Pilotage Authority

 

Chief Executive Officer

Parks Canada

 

Vice-Chairperson and Member

Patented Medicine Prices Review Board

 

Commissioner

Public Service Commission

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Gwich’in)

 

Member and Alternate Member

Renewable Resources Board (Sahtu)

 

Principal

Royal Military College of Canada

 

Chairperson

Telefilm Canada